Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: I need your help, what are symptoms of autoimmune disease?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    156
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts

    Default I need your help, what are symptoms of autoimmune disease?

    Can you please share with me the symptoms of autoimmune disease?
    Last edited by merryalliss30; 06-05-2011 at 01:40 PM.

  2. #2
    tgal's Avatar
    tgal is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the Solar System
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    4,521
    Thanks
    1,547
    Thanked 1,740 Times in 1,211 Posts

    Default

    That is really difficult to say because there really is no way to diagnose Lupus it is simply the matter of discounting everything else. I am going to post a link to our "Newly Diagnosed" section. After that I am going to give you the symptoms as shown at Lupus.Org. Hope this information helps!

    http://forum.wehavelupus.com/showthr...upus-Diagnosis

    What are the Symptoms of Lupus

    Because lupus can affect so many different organs, a wide range of symptoms can occur. These symptoms may come and go, and different symptoms may appear at different times during the course of the disease.

    The most common symptoms of lupus, which are the same for females and males, are:

    * extreme fatigue (tiredness)
    * headaches
    * painful or swollen joints
    * fever
    * anemia (low numbers of red blood cells or hemoglobin, or low total blood volume)
    * swelling (edema) in feet, legs, hands, and/or around eyes
    * pain in chest on deep breathing (pleurisy)
    * butterfly-shaped rash across cheeks and nose
    * sun- or light-sensitivity (photosensitivity)
    * hair loss
    * abnormal blood clotting
    * fingers turning white and/or blue when cold (Raynaud’s phenomenon)
    * mouth or nose ulcers

    Many of these symptoms occur in other illnesses besides lupus. In fact, lupus is sometimes called "the great imitator" because its symptoms are often like the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, blood disorders, fibromyalgia, diabetes, thyroid problems, Lyme disease, and a number of heart, lung, muscle, and bone diseases
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,036
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 365 Times in 315 Posts

    Default

    tgal as given you a good idea of the symptoms but without actually knowing what autoimmune disease your refering to, no one can be more precise on the symptoms, as there's so many autoimmune diseases.

    If your able to add the Disease then member's could help even more.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    156
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    I'm referring to MCTD or Lupus. My rhematologist told me she didn't know what to think of me. That I didn't fit into the category of anything. Said I didn't have the tenderpoints for fibromyalgia and that my only symptoms were muscle pain and fatigue, and that I had a positive ANA/RNP, and that those symptoms were so vague they could mean anything. She said most people have fibro because of depression and she went on to talk like there wasn't anything wrong with me.

    I have more symptoms than muscle pain & fatigue. I could make a long list, but I won't. I mainly have muscle weakness, and neuropathic pain/sensations, I have the flares, lip ulcers that precipitate the flares. But there are other things too. And I found out this week I could have coronary heart disease.

    I respond to antimalarial treatment, but the way this doctor put it, there would likely be no use trying me on any medication, because nothing would probably work. She even tried talking me out of taking neurontin, and I am not on that for fibro muscle aches, I am on that for my back pain and nerve issues.

  5. #5
    tgal's Avatar
    tgal is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the Solar System
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    4,521
    Thanks
    1,547
    Thanked 1,740 Times in 1,211 Posts

    Default

    If I get a vote I would say fire that doctor and get one that will listen to you! You hired them, you can fire them as well! Having said that, many of us have been down the path you are on and my heart goes out to you. For many it takes months or even years to get the diagnosis we should have had from the beginning. The saddest part is that the doctors allow us to keep getting worse until they finally do what should have been done from day one.

    You really should think of going to someone who will listen. Get copies of all of your records (labs and doctors reports) and make a folder for them. If/when you decide to change doctors let us know because many here have learned some great tricks to make them understand what is going on! Good luck to you!
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







  6. The Following User Says Thank You to tgal For This Useful Post:

    steve.b (05-08-2011)

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,036
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 365 Times in 315 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maryalice40 View Post
    I'm referring to MCTD or Lupus. My rhematologist told me she didn't know what to think of me. That I didn't fit into the category of anything. Said I didn't have the tenderpoints for fibromyalgia and that my only symptoms were muscle pain and fatigue, and that I had a positive ANA/RNP, and that those symptoms were so vague they could mean anything. She said most people have fibro because of depression and she went on to talk like there wasn't anything wrong with me.

    I have more symptoms than muscle pain & fatigue. I could make a long list, but I won't. I mainly have muscle weakness, and neuropathic pain/sensations, I have the flares, lip ulcers that precipitate the flares. But there are other things too. And I found out this week I could have coronary heart disease.

    I respond to antimalarial treatment, but the way this doctor put it, there would likely be no use trying me on any medication, because nothing would probably work. She even tried talking me out of taking neurontin, and I am not on that for fibro muscle aches, I am on that for my back pain and nerve issues.
    Hi Maryalice40,

    Thanks for replying back and letting we know more of what your going through and what's been said and also on your test's. Your rheumo as'nt got a clue what she's on about and i hope you have'nt got coronary heart disease as that alone is something to put up with. Your rheumo should be running more bloods to make sure, as it's a well know fact that lupus makes peoples bloods fluctuate and can give off false readings but myself i would get someone else if possible.

    I can't say you have Lupus or any autoimmune diseases as i'm not a doctor but my god you have strong symptoms refering to them and we all suffer muscular pain and fatigue and she did'nt mention to tell you that depression is the main trigger for anything to do with lupus it thrieves on depression and makes you worse and there's alot of member's besides myself having health issues your having.

    If you've been on antimalarial treatment that is used for lupus and neurontin is for fibro, something needs sorting if your suffering with this amount of problems.

    Well if you do have MCTD alot of your issues combine with how i suffer and what i'm diagnosed with.

    I'm going to add below info on MCTD and also Lupus so it may help you with anymore affects you have and write them down to let her know what else your suffering but please get more bloods done if possible if your stopping with the same rheumo.

    Terri xxx
    Last edited by Peridot20_Gem; 05-07-2011 at 04:52 PM.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,036
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 365 Times in 315 Posts

    Default

    MCTD SYMPTOMS

    What are connective tissues?

    The connective tissues are the structural portions of our body that essentially hold the cells of the body together. These tissues form a framework or matrix for the body. The connective tissues are composed of two major structural molecules, collagen and elastin. There are many different collagen proteins that vary in amount in each tissue of the body. Elastin is another protein that has the capability of stretching and returning to original length like a spring. Elastin is the major component of ligaments (tissues which attach bone to bone).

    Connective tissue diseases are disorders featuring abnormalities involving the collagen and elastin. Connective tissue diseases are often characterized by a variety of immune abnormalities that are common for each particular type of illness.


    What diseases characteristically affect connective tissue?

    Diseases of connective tissue that are strictly inheritable (due to genetic inheritance) include Marfan syndrome (can have tissue abnormalities in the heart, aorta, lungs, eyes, and skeleton) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (may have loose, fragile skin or loose [hyperextensible] joints). Pseudoxanthoma elasticum is an inherited disorder of elastin.

    Other diseases of connective tissue do not have specific gene abnormalities as their sole cause. These connective tissue diseases occur for unknown reasons. They are characterized as a group by the presence of spontaneous over activity of the immune system, which results in the production of unusual antibodies into the blood.

    The classic immune-related connective tissue diseases include systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, polymyositis, and dermatomyositis. Each of these diseases has a characteristic presentation with typical clinical findings that doctors can recognize during an examination. Each also has characteristic blood test abnormalities and abnormal antibody patterns. However, each of these diseases can evolve slowly or rapidly from very subtle abnormalities before demonstrating the classic features that help in the diagnosis. When these conditions have not developed the classic features of a particular disease, doctors will often refer to the condition as "undifferentiated connective tissue disease." This implies that the characteristic features that are used to define the classic connective tissue disease are not present, but some symptoms or signs of connective disease exist. Individuals with undifferentiated connective tissue disease may never develop a fully definable condition or they may eventually develop a classic connective tissue disease.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,036
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 365 Times in 315 Posts

    Default

    LUPUS SUMMARY

    What is lupus?

    Lupus Stats
    ■Frequency: 30 - 50 new cases every year per 100,000 people.
    ■In the USA, roughtly 2 Million people have Lupus. More people have lupus than cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, and MS combined
    ■Mortality: 10 year survival rate 76-90%; 90% live a normal life span
    ■Sex Bias: women are 9x more likely to develop lupus then men.
    ■Race Bias: 1 out of 600 Caucasian women develop Lupus; 1 out of 200 African-American women develeop Lupus


    Lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, multisystem disorder of the immune system. “Lupus” means wolf and Erythematosus means “redness.” Doctors coined this name for the disease because they thought the facial rash that frequently accompanies lupus looked like the bite of a wolf.

    In lupus, the body develops antibodies that react against the person’s own normal tissue. Lupus is thus an autoimmune disease.These antibodies are markers for lupus, and are one indicator of many immune system abnormalities that lead to clinical manifestations. The course is unpredictable and individualized; no two patients are alike. Lupus is not contagious, infectious, or malignant.

    There are four categories of lupus: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), cutaneous lupus, drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus, and neonatal lupus.

    SLE is the form of the disease that most people are referring to when they say "lupus." The word "systemic" means the disease can affect many parts of the body. The symptoms of SLE may be mild or serious. Although SLE usually first affects people between the ages of 15 and 45 years, it can occur in childhood or later in life as well

    What are the symptoms of lupus?

    Lupus can affect many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain. Although people with the disease may have many different symptoms, some of the most common ones include extreme fatigue, painful or swollen joints (arthritis), unexplained fever, skin rashes, and kidney problems.

    Lupus varies greatly in severity, from mild cases requiring minimal intervention to those in which significant and potentially fatal damage occurs to vital organs such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, and brain. For some patients, the disease can be characterized by “flares” of activity interspersed with periods of improvement or remission.

    A flare, or exacerbation, is increased activity of the disease process with an increase in physical manifestations and/or abnormal laboratory test values. Periods of improvement may last weeks, months, or even years. Other patients have continuous, or chronic, activity. Although remissions are unusual, some patients never develop severe manifestations, and the outlook is improving for patients who do develop them.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    2,998
    Thanks
    256
    Thanked 146 Times in 77 Posts

    Default

    Hi...MaryAlice

    Regarding Lupus...ask your DR why she does not think you have Lupus with a positive ANA and your symptoms. Despite it not being thee diagnostic tool ANA, as there is none..it is a good indicator you may have Lupus. Ask her to conduct the anti (ds) dna test....that is more Lupus specific.

    To receive a Lupus diagnosis.... you have to meet 4 of the ACR 11 criteria for a Lupus diagnose. It is an accumulative disease and you do not need all 4 symptoms at once. And if she suspects Lupus, but is not ready to make a diagnose, she still can treat your symptoms as of a Lupus patient with Plaquenil. This is the first wall of defense to manage the disease....it helps with fatigue, joint pain and ulcers.

    There are many permanent messages on the forum under each heading...check those out...very informative.

    Be well...hugs.
    Oluwa
    I have Lupus. So *^#@! what.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Oluwa For This Useful Post:

    rob (05-07-2011), tgal (05-07-2011)

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    156
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    My ANA is 1:640, my RNP was 7.3, pretty high. The RNP is 4.3 right now. It does raise/lower with treatment, and indicates how I feel when doing so. I can't believe a rhematologist would not be open minded about this. The one I went to was such an old hag. I thought rhematologists treat fibromyalgia also, why is it they send you out the door if they think that is all that is wrong? This one doesn't even think fibromyalgia is anything more than depression. I do meet the criteria with Lupus, positive ANA, mouth ulcers, low white blood counts, neurological disorder (I've had psychosis issues in the past, seeing, hearing things). I've had a malar butterfly rash on my face after using tanning beds, but that is the only thing that brought it on, it eventually went away. With kidney disease, only thing I can account to that are kidney stones, UTI's, and hydronephrosis, they function normally. I've had blood in my urine all of the time, but right now it looks good, after many years of not doing so. My kidneys burn and hurt when I need to pea sometimes. It's like having IC in my kidneys. I have bladder problems also, IC and my nerves are affecting it. It's shaped oddly and I haven't been able to find out why yet. I have had pleurisy. Chest pain, shortness of breath, and PVC's on exersion. My EKG did not look good and I have had other things going on that could indicate heart disease. The coronary heart disease is a big risk factor with my family as is. It's what caused the heart attacks with my grandparents. My stress test is next week. She knew of all these problems except that my doctor is doing a stress test to see if I have a blockage. She blew everything off trying to say the only symptoms I had were only fatigue and muscle pain. The muscle weakness is part of the criteria for MCTD but I don't have the swollen fingers or raynauds, but my fingers are getting very weak and hurt. I have really bad upper GI issues and have had swallowing problems, I think that is another one for criteria of MCTD. My fatigue has been extreme for 14 years, muscle pain followed years later. I have headaches, neck/back problems, and the neuropathic pain hit me about 2 years ago, it is widespread and pretty bad. I know these diseases can attack your nervous system and my neuro thinks it's an AI disease doing this, but I am still being evaluated for MS and to see if it shows why I have congenitive issues so bad, it's so bad, you could compare it to alzheimer's. I love my neurologist, I do not have to worry even for a second that he will second question that I am actually sick. He wanted me to go to a Lupus clinic out of state but I had no way of getting there. And after all this with a rheumatologist, I just don't have the heart to go back to another one and let them unnecessarily stress me out like that. I am on medication now and it's not through my rheumatologist but I guess we will see if it affects me or not. I'm on plaquenil and imuran now. Toradol gives me immediate relief with the neuropathic issues nearly stopping it, but it comes back. Neurontin, controls part of the pain, but it's still so crazy. I couldn't even stand life without the toradol. When my pain is extreme, it's the only thing I can count on to calm it down. Do you all think another rheumatologist would look at all these problems instead of blowing me off like this one did? I just don't know what I should do. I have the medication for it, and a good primary care doctor to help me, and keep an eye on me, so why do I need a rheumatologist?

    Thanks so much for helping. I can't explain how much it means to me, but it means alot!!!! I knew my symptoms meant more than what she acknowledged (fatigue & pain) to an autoimmune disease. I am just baffled from her lack of caring.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •