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Thread: List of 63 Auto-Immune Disorders

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    Default List of 63 Auto-Immune Disorders

    List of 63 Auto-Immune Disorders




    Alopecia Areata

    Anklosing Spondylitis

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Autoimmune Addison’s Disease

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ATP)

    Behcet’s Disease

    Bullous Pemphigoid

    Cardiomyopathy

    Celiac Sprue-Dermatitis

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Immune Deficiency Syndrome (CFIDS)

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    Cicatricial Pemphigoid

    Cold Agglutinin Disease

    CREST Syndrome

    Crohn’s Disease

    Dego’s Disease

    Dermatomyositis

    Dermatomyositis - Juvenile

    Discoid Lupus

    Essential Mixed Cryoglobulinemia

    Fibromyalgia – Fibromyositis

    Grave’s Disease

    Guillain-Barre

    Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP)

    IgA Nephropathy

    Insulin Dependent Diabetes (Type I)

    Juvenile Arthritis

    Lupus

    Meniere’s Disease

    Mixed connective Tissue Disease

    Multiple Sclerosis

    Myasthenia Gravis

    Pemphigus Vulgaris

    Pernicious Anemia

    Polyarteritis Nodosa

    Polychondritis

    Polyglancular Syndromes

    Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis

    Primary Agammaglobulinemia

    Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Psoriasis

    Raynaud’s Phenomenon

    Reiter’s Syndrome

    Rheumatic Fever

    Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Sarcoidosis

    Scleroderma

    Sjogren’s Syndrome

    Stiff-Man Syndrome

    Takayasu Arteritis

    Temporal Arteritis/Giant Cell Arteritis

    Ulcerative Colitis

    Uveitis

    Vasculitis

    Vitiligo

    Wegener’s Granulomatosis



    Look For The Good and Praise It!
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    There are also some rare diseases that are autoimmune. I have one called eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome.
    Last edited by GoodDog; 03-07-2011 at 01:42 PM.

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    Thank You For Including your information here. We need to know as much as we can about all of the AI diseases that do (& can) affect us!

    Thanx
    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Great thread! Great minds think alike. I'm so glad you made it a stickie. If I may suggest - perhaps there is a way to link the definitions of these diseases to their names?
    As long as this body works, I am going to enjoy life to the fullest for each second of every moment that I can.



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    Fantastic thread saysusie and it expose's so many for member's to know what autoimmune disease can cause.

    Terri x
    Last edited by Peridot20_Gem; 03-11-2011 at 07:24 AM.

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    There was a partial list like this in the latest Costco Connections magazine. I think that I also saw an article about AI disease in a recent Oprah magazine.
    It's good to see that there is more awareness out there.
    I was very interested to see Meniere's listed. That was my first dx - long before any other AI symptoms started to show up. Yet, when I've asked docs if it could have been my first hint, I was told "totally unrelated" by all but one. Go figure!!!
    Hugs,
    Marla

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    I have added a basic description to each of these conditions.
    Hope thet help you to understand.
    the list continues into a few posts.

    Alopecia Areata
    :- is a recurrent non scarring type of hair loss that can affect any hair-bearing area. Clinically, alopecia areata can manifest many different patterns. Although medically benign, alopecia areata can cause tremendous emotional and psychosocial distress in affected patients and their families. The most widely accepted hypothesis is that alopecia areata is a T-cell–mediated autoimmune condition.

    Anklosing Spondylitis
    :- Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a type of inflammatory arthritis that targets the joints of the spine, particularly the sacroiliac (SI) joint where the spine attaches to the pelvis. Symptoms include back pain, stiffness and reduced mobility.

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome
    :- Hughes syndrome is thickening of the blood, caused by an abnormal immune system response that produces antiphospholipid antibodies. Hughes syndrome is also called 'sticky blood syndrome' or antiphospholipid syndrome. There is no cure but medical treatment can ease symptoms and reduce the risk of complications.

    Autoimmune Addison’s Disease
    :- Addison's disease is a rare endocrine disorder. It occurs when the adrenal glands cannot produce sufficient hormones (corticosteroids). It is thought to be caused by an autoimmune disorder. Addison's disease is managed with steroid (corticosteroid) replacement for life.

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
    :- Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a drop in the number of red blood cells due to increased destruction by the body's defense (immune) system. Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia accounts for one-half of all immune hemolytic anemias.

    Autoimmune Hepatitis
    :- Autoimmune hepatitis is inflammation of the liver that occurs when immune cells mistake the liver's normal cells for harmful invaders and attack them.

    Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease
    :- The most prominent symptom of AIED is bilateral asymmetric progressive or fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss, meaning hearing loss in both ears of different severity that occurs unpredictably or worsens over time. The hearing loss typically occurs over several months but can progress over several years and is often accompanied by tinnitus. The most prominent symptom of AIED is bilateral asymmetric progressive or fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss, meaning hearing loss in both ears of different severity that occurs unpredictably or worsens over time. The hearing loss typically occurs over several months but can progress over several years and is often accompanied by tinnitus.

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)
    :- In ALPS, unusually high numbers of white blood cells called lymphocytes accumulate in the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, which can lead to enlargement of these organs. ALPS can cause numerous autoimmune problems such as anemia (low count of red blood cells), thrombocytopenia (low count of platelets), and neutropenia (low count of neutrophils, the most common type of white blood cell in humans).

    Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ATP)
    :- Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a rare autoimmune disorder. The person's blood doesn't clot properly because the blood clotting platelets are destroyed by antibodies. Symptoms include bruising easily, a rash of small red dots, bleeding from the gums or any area of the body, frequent nosebleeds and abnormal menstruation.

    Behcet’s Disease
    :- Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves inflammation of the blood vessels. The most common symptoms are sores in the mouth, sores on the sex organs, other skin sores, swelling of parts of the eye, pain, swelling and stiffness of the joints. More serious problems can include meningitis, blood clots, inflammation of the digestive system and blindness.

    Bullous Pemphigoid
    :- Pemphigus is an autoimmune disorder in which your antibodies attack healthy cells in your skin and mouth, causing blisters and sores.

    Cardiomyopathy
    :- Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue.

    Celiac Sprue-Dermatitis
    :- If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Gluten is a protein in wheat, rye and barley. It is found mainly in foods but may also be in other products like medicines, vitamins and even the glue on stamps and envelopes.

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Immune Deficiency Syndrome (CFIDS)
    :- Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities. Symptoms of CFS include fatigue for 6 months or more and experiencing other problems such as muscle pain, memory problems, headaches, pain in multiple joints, sleep problems, sore throat and tender lymph nodes.

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
    :- Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a neurological disorder characterized by progressive weakness and impaired sensory function in the legs and arms. The disorder, which is sometimes called chronic relapsing polyneuropathy, is caused by damage to the myelin sheath (the fatty covering that wraps around and protects nerve fibers) of the peripheral nerves. It often presents with symptoms that include tingling or numbness (beginning in the toes and fingers), weakness of the arms and legs, loss of deep tendon reflexes (areflexia), fatigue, and abnormal sensations.

    Cicatricial Pemphigoid
    :- Pemphigoid is also an autoimmune skin disease. It leads to deep blisters that do not break easily.

    Cold Agglutinin Disease
    :- Agglutinins are antibodies that cause the red blood cells to clump together.
    Cold agglutinins are active at cold temperatures.
    Febrile (warm) agglutinins are active at normal body temperatures.

    CREST Syndrome
    :- Limited scleroderma, or CREST syndrome, is one subtype of scleroderma — a condition that literally means "hardened skin."The skin changes associated with limited scleroderma typically occur only in the lower arms and legs, and sometimes the face and throat. Limited scleroderma can also affect your digestive tract and can cause serious heart and lung disorders.

    Crohn’s Disease
    :- Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the full thickness of the intestine involving any part of the digestive tract from the mouth to the anus.

    Dego’s Disease
    :- Degos disease, also known as malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare disorder. It affects the lining of the small blood vessels resulting in blockage. The blood vessels affected include those supplying the skin, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system.

    Dermatomyositis
    :- Dermatomyositis is one of a group of muscle diseases known as the inflammatory myopathies, which are characterized by chronic muscle inflammation accompanied by muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis’ cardinal symptom is a skin rash that precedes, accompanies, or follows progressive muscle weakness. The rash looks patchy, with purple or red discolorations, and characteristically develops on the eyelids and on muscles used to extend or straighten joints, including knuckles, elbows, knees, and toes. Red rashes may also occur on the face, neck, shoulders, upper chest, back, and other locations, and there may be swelling in the affected areas. The rash sometimes occurs without obvious muscle involvement. Adults with dermatomyositis may experience weight loss, a low-grade fever, inflamed lungs, and be sensitive to light such that the rash or muscle disease gets worse. In some cases of dermatomyositis, distal muscles (muscles located away from the trunk of the body, such as those in the forearms and around the ankles and wrists) may be affected as the disease progresses.

    Dermatomyositis - Juvenile
    :- Children and adults with dermatomyositis may develop calcium deposits, which appear as hard bumps under the skin or in the muscle (called calcinosis). Calcinosis most often occurs 1-3 years after the disease begins.

    Discoid Lupus
    :- Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic skin condition that appears as reddened and round scaly patches that tend to develop in sun-exposed areas such as the face and hands. Sometimes, extensive lesions can develop across other areas of the body including the neck and upper back.

    Essential Mixed Cryoglobulinemia
    :- The name literally means “cold antibody in the blood”, which refers to the chemical properties of the antibodies that cause this disease: cryoglobulins are antibodies that precipitate under cold conditions. It is now evident that most patients diagnosed with type III (mixed essential cryoglobulinemia), have the disease as an immune response to chronic hepatitis C infection. The role of hepatitis C virus is suggested by finding that the cryoglobulins in these patients are enriched with anti–hepatitis C antibody and hepatitis C RNA. Moreover, antviral therapy can remit the disease in some patients.

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    page 2 of definitions.

    Fibromyalgia – Fibromyositis
    :- Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS or fibromyalgia) is a term used to describe a cluster of symptoms that may include widespread pain and tenderness in ‘trigger points’ on the body that are abnormally sore to touch.

    Grave’s Disease
    :- Hyperthyroidism means the thyroid gland is overactive. The thyroid gland controls important metabolic processes, such as growth and energy expenditure. An immune system abnormality called Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism.


    Guillain-Barre
    :- Guillain-Barrè syndrome is an autoimmune condition in which the person’s nerves are attacked by the body’s own immune defence system. As a result of the attack, the nerve insulation (myelin) and sometimes even the inner covered part of the nerve (axon) is damaged and signals are delayed or otherwise changed - this causes a spreading paralysis.

    Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis
    :- Hashimoto’s disease is a common cause of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). It is an autoimmune condition. Immune system cells attack the thyroid gland, causing inflammation and, in most cases, eventual destruction of the gland. This reduces the thyroid’s ability to make hormones.

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
    :- "Idiopathic" means no cause can be found. No one knows what causes pulmonary fibrosis or why some people get it. It causes the lungs to become scarred and stiffened. This stiffening may make it increasingly difficult to breathe. In some people the disease gets worse quickly (over months to a few years), but other people have little worsening of the disease over time. The condition is believed to result from an inflammatory response to an unknown substance.

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP)
    :- "Idiopathic" means no cause can be found. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a rare autoimmune disorder. The person's blood doesn't clot properly because the blood clotting platelets are destroyed by antibodies. Symptoms include bruising easily, a rash of small red dots, bleeding from the gums or any area of the body, frequent nosebleeds and abnormal menstruation.

    IgA Nephropathy
    :- IgA nephropathy is a problem related to the immune system, in which there is thickening of part of the filtering unit of the kidney. Although IgA nephropathy can develop as part of other conditions, most commonly the cause or trigger is not known.

    Insulin Dependent Diabetes (Type I)
    :- Hyperglycaemia means too much glucose is circulating in the blood. When blood glucose is persistently high, a diagnosis of diabetes is made. Most people have either Type I or Type II diabetes. Some people may have conditions that can cause diabetes, such as Cushing's syndrome, pancreatitis or liver disease. Without treatment, diabetes can damage organs including the kidneys, eyes and nerves. Hypoglycaemia means low blood glucose levels. The two main types are insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (now referred to as Type I diabetes) and non-insulin dependent diabetes (now referred to as Type II diabetes).

    Juvenile Arthritis
    :- Arthritis is a general term describing over 100 different conditions that cause pain, stiffness, swelling and often inflammation in one or more joints. Juvenile arthritis describes seven types of arthritis diagnosed in children. Other names for juvenile arthritis include juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile chronic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and Still's disease.

    Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE)
    :- Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE) is an autoimmune condition that causes various tissues in the body to become inflamed (swollen and painful). The symptoms depend on which tissues are affected. The immune system mistakenly attacks particular tissues including the skin, joints, kidneys and lining of the heart and lungs, causing ongoing inflammation and pain.

    Meniere’s Disease
    :- Meniere's disease affects the ear, which is the seat of hearing and balance. The condition causes vertigo, dizziness, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus (ringing or hissing in the ears). Attacks can be minutes or hours long. Over time, the hearing is permanently damaged. There is no cure but the condition can be managed.

    Mixed connective Tissue Disease
    :- Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an uncommon autoimmune disorder that causes overlapping features of primarily three connective tissue diseases — lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. Mixed connective tissue disease also may have features of rheumatoid arthritis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease is sometimes referred to as an overlap disease.
    Indications of these diseases usually don't appear all at once, which complicates the diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease. People with mixed connective tissue disease often are first diagnosed with lupus. As the disease progresses and other signs and symptoms become apparent, the diagnosis is updated.
    Early indications of mixed connective tissue disease typically are nonspecific and may be mistaken for any of the three connective tissue diseases — lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. Signs and symptoms include: Raynaud's disease, Fatigue, General feeling of being unwell (malaise), Muscle pains (myalgias), Joint pains (athralgias), Mild fever, Joint swelling, Swollen hands and puffy fingers

    Multiple Sclerosis
    :- Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable disease of the central nervous system that can affect the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves.

    Myasthenia Gravis
    :- Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterised by muscular weakness. In order to move at will, voluntary muscles receive chemical messages (neurotransmitters) from nerves (motor neurones) at special structures called neuromuscular junctions, where the nerve joins the muscle fibre. The neurotransmitter passes to a receptor, which is activated and causes the muscle to contract.
    In myasthenia gravis, the immune system stops the action of the neurotransmitter by blocking or destroying the receptor in the neuromuscular junction - this prevents the muscle from contracting.


    Pemphigus Vulgaris
    :- Pemphigus is an autoimmune disorder in which your antibodies attack healthy cells in your skin and mouth, causing blisters and sores.

    Pernicious Anemia
    :- Anaemia is a deficiency in the number or quality of red blood cells. Lack of iron is common in anaemic people. Symptoms include tiredness, breathlessness and pale skin. Treatment may include iron supplements. Pernicious anaemia may require injections of vitamin B12.

    Polyarteritis Nodosa
    :- Polyarteritis nodosa is a disease of unknown cause that affects arteries, the blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood to organs and tissues. It occurs when certain immune cells attack the affected arteries. It damages the tissues supplied by the affected arteries because the tissues aren't receiving the oxygen and nourishment they need.

    Polychondritis
    :- Polychondritis, also called relapsing polychondritis, is a rare disease in which cartilage in many areas of the body becomes inflamed. The disease most commonly affects the ears, nose and the airways of the lungs. Polychondritis is a systemic (body-wide) illness. Common symptoms include:- Fatigue or malaise, Fever, Red, swollen, painful (inflamed) ears, hearing loss, dizziness, Ears that are "floppy," that is, they are softer than normal, limp or droppy, Inflammation over the bridge of the nose, nasal congestion, Arthritis, Shortness of breath, cough, stridor (high-pitched sound during breathing), Eye inflammation, leaky heart valves, kidney disease, neurological problems, rash.

    Polyglancular Syndromes
    :- This condition is characterized by three specific features: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Affected individuals typically have at least two of these features, and many have all three.
    Mucocutaneous candidiasis is a fungal infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes, such as the moist lining of the nose and mouth. Hypoparathyroidism, is a malfunction of the parathyroid glands. These glands secrete a hormone that regulates the body's use of calcium and phosphorus. Hypoparathyroidism can cause a tingling sensation in the lips, fingers, and toes; muscle pain and cramping; weakness; and fatigue. The third major feature, Addison disease, results from a malfunction of the small hormone-producing glands on top of each kidney (adrenal glands). The main features of Addison disease include fatigue, muscle weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, low blood pressure, and changes in skin coloring.

    Polymyalgia Rheumatica
    :- Polymyalgia rheumatica is a condition causing pain and stiffness in older adults. Typical symptoms include severe and painful muscle aches and stiffness, particularly affecting the neck, shoulders and thighs. The onset is usually sudden. It is common and very treatable. Polymyalgia rheumatica should not be confused with fibromyalgia – a condition that causes pain and muscle stiffness but does not cause inflammation.

    Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis
    :- Polymyositis is a connective tissue disease that triggers inflammation and muscular weakness. The cause is unknown, but polymyositis is thought to be an autoimmune disorder, possibly triggered by a viral infection of muscle tissue. Usually, the muscle weakness develops gradually over the course of a few weeks or months. The inflammation may spread to other areas of the body including the heart.

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    page 3 of 3 for definitions.

    Primary Agammaglobulinemia
    :- When a defect in the immune system is inherited (carried through the genes), it is called primary, or inherited.
    Agammaglobulinemia is an inherited disorder in which there are very low levels of protective immune system proteins called immunoglobulins. People with this disorder repeatedly develop infections. It is the result of a genetic abnormality that blocks the development of normal, mature immune system cells called B lymphocytes. As a result, the body produces very little (if any) immunoglobulins in the bloodstream. Immunoglobulins play a major role in the immune response, which protects against illness and infection. Without protective immunoglobulins, people with agammaglobulinemia repeatedly develop infections. People with this disorder are particularly susceptible to bacterial infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococci (Streptococcus pneumoniae), and staphylococci, as well as to repeated viral infections.

    Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
    :- Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is chronic inflammation and scarring of the bile ducts within the liver. The cause is unknown and there is no cure. PBC seems to be associated with other autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma and Sjogren's syndrome but the reason is not known. Symptoms vary but may include fatigue, skin pigmentation, jaundice, itching skin, weight loss, easy bruising and indigestion.

    Psoriasis
    :- Psoriasis is a non-contagious skin condition. It causes red, scaly patches to develop on the skin. Skin affected by psoriasis grows much quicker than normal skin. There is no cure for psorasis, but it can be controlled with treatment. Symptoms may include red scaly patches on skin, itchiness and shedding of scales of skin. Psoriasis can cause a form of arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis.

    Raynaud’s Phenomenon
    :- Raynaud's phenomenon affects the blood flow to the extremities, most often fingers and toes. It is caused by a sudden constriction of the blood vessels. The skin will change in colour from white, to blue and then red. There is usually discomfort such as pain, tingling and numbness


    Reiter’s Syndrome
    :- Reactive arthritis can follow a bacterial infection. The joints of the legs and feet are most commonly affected. The condition generally resolves by itself over a few months. Unlike other forms of arthritis, reactive arthritis does not destroy the affected joint. It is not contagious. Reactive arthritis was formerly known as Reiter's syndrome.

    Rheumatic Fever
    :- Rheumatic fever is a disease that can occur following an infection caused by the Group A streptococcus bacterium. If untreated, an infection such as ‘strep throat’ may spread and cause inflammation in other parts of the body, particularly the joints, heart, skin and brain. Rheumatic fever is classed as an autoimmune disease because the inflammation is probably caused by the immune system’s reaction to the bacteria. Without treatment, the disease can lead to serious complications such as rheumatic heart disease.

    Rheumatoid Arthritis
    :- Rheumatoid arthritis affects the joints and particularly hands, feet and knees. Other parts of the body can also be affected. Inflammation causes the joints to become painful and swollen and movement is restricted. Stiffness in the joints is common, especially in the morning. The inflammation caused by rheumatoid arthritis can result in damage to the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis usually starts in middle life, with onset generally occurring between the ages of 25 to 50. However, elderly people can develop it.

    Sarcoidosis
    :- Sarcoidosis causes small inflammatory nodules or granulomas to form, mainly in the lungs and chest lymph glands. It mostly affects people in their late 20s to early 40s. Symptoms include breathlessness, tiredness, a cough or chest discomfort. The cause is not known - it is not a cancer and 80 per cent of cases require no treatment. The remaining 20 per cent are usually treated with corticosteroid drugs and the granulomas dissolve away. The majority of patients overcome their illness within a year or two.

    Scleroderma
    :- Scleroderma means hard skin. It is a group of diseases that causes abnormal growth of connective tissue, the proteins that support your skin and organs. There are two main types. Localized scleroderma affects only your skin. Systemic scleroderma affects your blood vessels and internal organs, as well as your skin. Symptoms of scleroderma include:- Calcium deposits in connective tissues, Raynaud's phenomenon, narrowing of blood vessels in the hands or feet, Swelling of the esophagus, the tube between your throat and stomach, Thick, tight skin on your fingers, Red spots on your hands and face

    Sjogren’s Syndrome
    :- Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that mainly affects the eyes and salivary glands, but can affect the sweat glands. Symptoms include dry and itchy eyes, a dry mouth, light sensitivity, thirst and swallowing difficulties. Although there is no cure, proper treatment should provide comfort and relief. The chance of developing lymphoma (cancer of the lymph glands) is also higher in people with Sjogren's syndrome.

    Stiff-Man Syndrome
    :- Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by fluctuating muscle rigidity in the trunk and limbs and a heightened sensitivity to stimuli such as noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms. Abnormal postures, often hunched over and stiffened, are characteristic of the disorder. People with SPS can be too disabled to walk or move, or they are afraid to leave the house because street noises, such as the sound of a horn, can trigger spasms and falls.

    Takayasu Arteritis
    :- Vasculitis refers to inflammation of blood vessels. In Takayasu’s arteritis, one of many types of vasculitis, this inflammation occurs in the walls of large arteries: the aorta and its major branches, which supply blood to the head, arms, legs, and internal organs. Inflammation may cause arterial walls to thicken resulting in narrowing of the inside diameter of the artery. If severe enough, such narrowings, also called “stenoses,” can result in reduced blood flow and decreased oxygen delivery to the body areas or organs supplied by the artery and cause symptoms and problems ranging from mildly annoying to life-threatening.

    Temporal Arteritis/Giant Cell Arteritis
    :- Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of arteries of the scalp, neck, and arms. The inflammation narrows the arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia rheumatica. Early symptoms of giant cell arteritis resemble the flu: fatigue, loss of appetite, and fever. Other symptoms include headaches, pain and tenderness over the temples, double vision or visual loss, dizziness, and problems with coordination and balance. You may also have pain in your jaw and tongue.

    Ulcerative Colitis
    :- Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both conditions affect the bowel, but in slightly different ways. Ulcerative colitis is inflammation of the large bowel (colon and rectum).

    Uveitis
    :- Iritis is inflammation of the iris, the coloured part of the eye. It is a form of uveitis and is more correctly termed anterior uveitis. Iritis symptoms typically begin suddenly and can include a red eye, eye pain, light sensitivity, blurred vision and a small or distorted pupil. Attacks typically only involve one eye at a time. Without correct treatment, iritis can cause permanent visual problems. There is no cure, but treatment of individual episodes can control inflammation and prevent complications. However, iritis often recurs.


    Vasculitis
    :- Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a short term inflammation of certain blood vessels (vasculitis). The cause of this malfunction is unknown, but HSP tends to develop after an upper respiratory tract infection or a bout of hay fever. Symptoms include a purple spotted skin rash, abdominal pain and gastrointestinal upsets such as diarrhoea. Generally, the older the person, the more severe the symptoms. The condition usually lasts around one to four weeks, and is often marked by relapses. In extreme cases, the kidneys are damaged to the point of renal failure.

    Vitiligo
    :- Vitiligo causes white patches on your skin. It can also affect your eyes, mouth and nose. It occurs when the cells that give your skin its colour are destroyed. No one knows what destroys them. The white patches are more common where your skin is exposed to the sun. In some cases, the patches spread. Vitiligo can cause your hair to gray early. If you have dark skin, you may lose color inside your mouth.

    Wegener’s Granulomatosis
    :- Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare type of inflammation that targets the arteries, veins and capillaries of vital organs. The organs usually affected are the kidneys and the respiratory system, including the lungs, trachea, nose and sinuses. Wegener's granulomatosis may be fatal without treatment, but treatment is usually successful in controlling the disease.


    Definitions compiled from the websites of the American “National Institutes of Health”, and “Better Health Channel” managed by the Victorian Government in Australia.

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to steve.b For This Useful Post:

    devilducky (09-15-2013), Gizmo (05-28-2011)

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    Awesome job Steve! Thanks so much!

    @ Susie- I appreciate the fact that you included Fibrom. in the list. I know that some doctors are FINALLY starting to see it as autoimmune but a vast majority are are still stuck in the past and will call anything they don't understand "fibro". I, like many of you, have Lupus and Fibro (along with several other things) and I believe the combination pf the two makes some days almost unbearable (Like today)
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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