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    Smile Blood results off my GP

    Hi Everyone, i went to the GP's last tuesday for full blood test's on everything going again and was told to ring friday, well i totally forgot about them.
    I've just phoned now and spoke to dawn and she's checked them and said everything as come in fine but listen to this one for being the best, i've got anemia again as alot of you know and are taking Folic acid tablets for life which the hospital finally confirmed. The blood result which as come back to the doctor's shows i have'nt got it now and my reading's at 13.5 which is correct for a woman and up to 14.0.
    I'm sitting here laughing at just how much the bloods fluctuate and keep telling different readings, no wonder half of us can't get a proper diagnosis when your bloods are running riot off the lupus.

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    Hi Peridot_Gem;
    You are so right about our lab results always fluctuating and, as such, getting a diagnosis is always a crap shoot. Sometimes our lab results come back in the normal ranger because we are taking our medications. Sometimes they come back in the normal range because our disease has gone into a form of inactivity. But, normal range lab results DOES NOT mean that we do not have the illness, in spite of the fact that so many doctors like to tell us that.
    I know that you are not asking to have this disease, but you do want definite answers and, unfortunately, that is something of a luxury for us. So, it is helpful to know that what is happening to us does have a name and that our lab results are telling us the status of that illness..not if we do or do not have it any longer.
    So, in that respect, I am glad that some of your labs are in the normal range. Could you tell us exactly which ones came back 13.5? Was it the ANA??
    Anemia is also something that is very common for most of us. Again, it is a symptom that can come and go. I hope that you can get you anemia under control. I wish you the very best

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    I feel for ya girl. Those pesky lab results are often our worst enemy! They change like the wind so, like Susie says, we have a hard time getting a diagnosis. I am keeping my fingers crossed for you
    Mari

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    Quote Originally Posted by tgal View Post
    I feel for ya girl. Those pesky lab results are often our worst enemy! They change like the wind so, like Susie says, we have a hard time getting a diagnosis. I am keeping my fingers crossed for you
    Hi Tgal, thanks mate for your support and understanding.
    Did your appointment go well with the Doctor you had to see.

    Luv Terri xxx

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    Hi Peridot_Gem;
    I'm not sure if you meant ANA or anemia. I just thought I would check because ANA and anemia are two totally, unrelated results.
    ANA= Anti-nuclear antibodies. This literally means 'substance against the cell nucleus'. The nucleus is the 'headquarters' of the living cell, therefore the ANA can damage or destroy cells & tissues. Lupus is a disease that literally destroys healthy cells and tissues.
    95%-98% of patients with Lupus will have a positive ANA. However, there are people with a positive ANA who do not have Lupus. Conversely, there are people who have a negative ANA who do, in fact, have Lupus. Therefore a positive ANA test, on it's own, does not mean that person has lupus and a negative ANA, on its own, does not mean that a person does not have Lupus.
    Because of this, your doctor should look very carefully at the titer (number of times your blood sample had to be diluted) & the pattern of the ANA test. The titer shows how many times the technician had to mix fluid from the your blood to get a sample free of ANAs. Thus a titer of 1:640 shows a greater concentration of ANA than 1:320 or 1:160, since it took 640 dilutions of the plasma before ANA was no longer detected.


    The pattern of the ANA is studied by microscope. The technician examines a specially prepared slide that shows where antibodies attack the nucleus. Certain antibodies attack certain areas of the nucleus, producing four specific patterns.
    1) The rim (peripheral) pattern is the most specific pattern for lupus, 2) while the homogeneous (diffuse) pattern is the most common pattern seen. The remaining patterns are the 3) speckled and 4) nucleolar patterns.

    it is important for your doctor to look at the pattern to decide which, if any, auto-immune disease is causing your symptoms and to start appropriate treatment.
    [COLOR=#737373 ! important][COLOR=#737373 ! important][/COLOR][/COLOR]Also, it is very important that you know that Lupus cannot be diagnosed or dismissed based purely upon the ANA results. There are many other tests that MUST be run in order to determine if you do or do not have Lupus. And, as I've mentioned, there are many, many people who definitely have Lupus with a continual negative ANA.

    Anemia = low hemoglobin or red blood cells. This has nothing to do with the nucleus of your cells(as does ANA).
    Anemia is the most common blood disorder in persons with Lupus. Normal red blood cells live only 120 days (about four months) and must constantly be produced by the bone marrow. The commonest explanation for anemia is reduced red cell production. This may be due to inflammation (a common symptom of Lupus); kidney problems (another common symptom of Lupus. Also, when the kidneys do not produce enough of the hormone, erythropoietin, that stimulates the marrow to make more red cells); iron deficiency (without which hemoglobin cannot be made—iron deficiency may result from menstrual bleeding or from intestinal bleeding due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs often used in Lupus treatment); or direct depression of the bone marrow by certain lupus drugs (such as azathioprine or cyclophosphamide). Intestinal bleeding can be obvious if the stool is red, maroon, or pitch black in color, but often bleeding is so slow and gradual that special stool tests are needed to detect it.


    So, it might be worth it for you to ask your doctor about running the other tests normally used to determine if Lupus is present. The results of ALL of these tests must be used, in conjunction with your symptoms, to determine if there is an auto-immune disease causing your symptoms and which one it might be (there are over 100). Those tests can include the following:
    1) Complete Blood Count (CBC)
    2) Urine tests (sometimes 24hr urine test)
    3) ANA

    4) Anti-DsNA..Antibodies to double-stranded DNA

    5) Antibodies to histone -- a protein that surrounds the DNA molecule
    6) Antibodies to phospholipids (aPLs)
    7) Antibodies to Ro/SS-A and La/SS-B (Ro and La are the names of proteins in the cell nucleus
    8) Anti-RNP = Antibodies to RNP target ribonucleoproteins, which help to control chemical activities of the cells.8) Anti-SM = Antibodies to Sm target Sm proteins in the cell nucleus
    9) CH50/ C3/C4 Compliment (Complement is a group of proteins that protect the body against infections. They work by strengthening the body’s immune reactions. C10) CRP=C-reactive protein, this is a protein produced by the liver, and high levels of CRP in your blood may mean you have inflammation due to lupus.
    omplement proteins are used up by the inflammation caused by lupus)
    11) ESR or SED Rate = Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is another test for inflammation.
    12) Prothrombin time (PT) measures blood clotting and can show whether you may be at risk for not clotting quickly enough
    13) Partial thromboplastin time (PTT) also measures how long it takes for your blood to begin to clot.
    14) Tissue biopsy Test

    • The skin and kidney are the most common sites biopsied in someone who may have lupus.
    • The results of the biopsy can show the amount of inflammation and any damage being done to the tissue

    So, as you can see, there is much more work that your doctors must do before they dismiss the possibility of Lupus. This is a very difficult disease to diagnose and, far too often, too many doctors do not want to do all that is necessary in order to find a definite answer for you. You have a right to demand that further testing be done before you allow them to brush you aside and offer no treatment.

    I wish you the very best!

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    I really believe we need to chip in and send Susie to medical school!
    Mari

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saysusie View Post
    Hi Peridot_Gem;
    I'm not sure if you meant ANA or anemia. I just thought I would check because ANA and anemia are two totally, unrelated results.
    ANA= Anti-nuclear antibodies. This literally means 'substance against the cell nucleus'. The nucleus is the 'headquarters' of the living cell, therefore the ANA can damage or destroy cells & tissues. Lupus is a disease that literally destroys healthy cells and tissues.
    95%-98% of patients with Lupus will have a positive ANA. However, there are people with a positive ANA who do not have Lupus. Conversely, there are people who have a negative ANA who do, in fact, have Lupus. Therefore a positive ANA test, on it's own, does not mean that person has lupus and a negative ANA, on its own, does not mean that a person does not have Lupus.
    Because of this, your doctor should look very carefully at the titer (number of times your blood sample had to be diluted) & the pattern of the ANA test. The titer shows how many times the technician had to mix fluid from the your blood to get a sample free of ANAs. Thus a titer of 1:640 shows a greater concentration of ANA than 1:320 or 1:160, since it took 640 dilutions of the plasma before ANA was no longer detected.


    The pattern of the ANA is studied by microscope. The technician examines a specially prepared slide that shows where antibodies attack the nucleus. Certain antibodies attack certain areas of the nucleus, producing four specific patterns.
    1) The rim (peripheral) pattern is the most specific pattern for lupus, 2) while the homogeneous (diffuse) pattern is the most common pattern seen. The remaining patterns are the 3) speckled and 4) nucleolar patterns.

    it is important for your doctor to look at the pattern to decide which, if any, auto-immune disease is causing your symptoms and to start appropriate treatment.
    [COLOR=#737373 ! important][COLOR=#737373 ! important][/COLOR][/COLOR]Also, it is very important that you know that Lupus cannot be diagnosed or dismissed based purely upon the ANA results. There are many other tests that MUST be run in order to determine if you do or do not have Lupus. And, as I've mentioned, there are many, many people who definitely have Lupus with a continual negative ANA.

    Anemia = low hemoglobin or red blood cells. This has nothing to do with the nucleus of your cells(as does ANA).
    Anemia is the most common blood disorder in persons with Lupus. Normal red blood cells live only 120 days (about four months) and must constantly be produced by the bone marrow. The commonest explanation for anemia is reduced red cell production. This may be due to inflammation (a common symptom of Lupus); kidney problems (another common symptom of Lupus. Also, when the kidneys do not produce enough of the hormone, erythropoietin, that stimulates the marrow to make more red cells); iron deficiency (without which hemoglobin cannot be made—iron deficiency may result from menstrual bleeding or from intestinal bleeding due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs often used in Lupus treatment); or direct depression of the bone marrow by certain lupus drugs (such as azathioprine or cyclophosphamide). Intestinal bleeding can be obvious if the stool is red, maroon, or pitch black in color, but often bleeding is so slow and gradual that special stool tests are needed to detect it.


    So, it might be worth it for you to ask your doctor about running the other tests normally used to determine if Lupus is present. The results of ALL of these tests must be used, in conjunction with your symptoms, to determine if there is an auto-immune disease causing your symptoms and which one it might be (there are over 100). Those tests can include the following:
    1) Complete Blood Count (CBC)
    2) Urine tests (sometimes 24hr urine test)
    3) ANA

    4) Anti-DsNA..Antibodies to double-stranded DNA

    5) Antibodies to histone -- a protein that surrounds the DNA molecule
    6) Antibodies to phospholipids (aPLs)
    7) Antibodies to Ro/SS-A and La/SS-B (Ro and La are the names of proteins in the cell nucleus
    8) Anti-RNP = Antibodies to RNP target ribonucleoproteins, which help to control chemical activities of the cells.8) Anti-SM = Antibodies to Sm target Sm proteins in the cell nucleus
    9) CH50/ C3/C4 Compliment (Complement is a group of proteins that protect the body against infections. They work by strengthening the body’s immune reactions. C10) CRP=C-reactive protein, this is a protein produced by the liver, and high levels of CRP in your blood may mean you have inflammation due to lupus.
    omplement proteins are used up by the inflammation caused by lupus)
    11) ESR or SED Rate = Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is another test for inflammation.
    12) Prothrombin time (PT) measures blood clotting and can show whether you may be at risk for not clotting quickly enough
    13) Partial thromboplastin time (PTT) also measures how long it takes for your blood to begin to clot.
    14) Tissue biopsy Test

    • The skin and kidney are the most common sites biopsied in someone who may have lupus.
    • The results of the biopsy can show the amount of inflammation and any damage being done to the tissue

    So, as you can see, there is much more work that your doctors must do before they dismiss the possibility of Lupus. This is a very difficult disease to diagnose and, far too often, too many doctors do not want to do all that is necessary in order to find a definite answer for you. You have a right to demand that further testing be done before you allow them to brush you aside and offer no treatment.

    I wish you the very best!

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Hi Saysusie,
    Sorry for the misunderstanding, it's the anemia showing normal again sorry. ANA has'nt been mentioned to me yet as i don't see him as you know till january but he's took enough bloods which i don't know the results of yet besides the x-rays but my stools are always mainly black and then i've got this trouble of losing blood even when it's not a monthly and turns to haemorraghing.
    The gyno doctor looked at my bloods and said i don't know what the readings me as this is not my field of work but your ENA is showing very high, i've looked that up but can't seem to get my head around exactley around what it is, where as yourself would know.

    Thankyou for getting back to me. Terri xxx

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saysusie View Post
    Hi Peridot_Gem;
    You are so right about our lab results always fluctuating and, as such, getting a diagnosis is always a crap shoot. Sometimes our lab results come back in the normal ranger because we are taking our medications. Sometimes they come back in the normal range because our disease has gone into a form of inactivity. But, normal range lab results DOES NOT mean that we do not have the illness, in spite of the fact that so many doctors like to tell us that.
    I know that you are not asking to have this disease, but you do want definite answers and, unfortunately, that is something of a luxury for us. So, it is helpful to know that what is happening to us does have a name and that our lab results are telling us the status of that illness..not if we do or do not have it any longer.
    So, in that respect, I am glad that some of your labs are in the normal range. Could you tell us exactly which ones came back 13.5? Was it the ANA??
    Anemia is also something that is very common for most of us. Again, it is a symptom that can come and go. I hope that you can get you anemia under control. I wish you the very best

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Hi Saysusie, yes i just want answers like alot of us and it's the ANA [anemia] which is showing normal again at 13.5 but the hospital did catch the blood results correctley and i'm to take folic acid tablets 5mg for life as it's always been on the border line with me for such a good while.

    Terri xxx

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