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Thread: i THOUGHT my Rhuemy appt was today.....

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    Default i THOUGHT my Rhuemy appt was today.....

    I took off work and everything. Got in there and the person at the front desk was like " um you arent supposed to be here until NEXT month on this date" Talk about memory problems, i dont even know what month it is!!! Anyway i left crying because i am so fed up with all these symptoms and called my dr. She ordered these tests:

    TSH 3rd Generation
    hCG/Beta Subunit, Quant
    Hep B Surface Antibody
    Hep C Antibody
    HIV-1/0/2 Antibodies
    Rheumatoid Arthritis Factor
    RPR
    CRP
    SSA & SSB antibodies
    Complement C3 & C4
    antids DNA & Antismith antibodies

    Meanwhile she has me on xanax and prozac to help with my anxiety and some other crap for my rash to help it not itch which i dont think is possible. it itches SO bad! She also found me another rhumey that can see me on the 27th which is awesome and i made sure it was this month!!!

    Also, i am having trouble reading my ANA results? Heres how it looks on the paper

    Antinuclear Antibodies Direct
    ANA Direct Sedimentation Rate-Westergren
    Positive 6 mm/hr
    Negative 0-20

    I have no idea what this means?
    Last edited by Maegan; 04-19-2010 at 02:59 PM.

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    ok i guess nobody else know how to read it either! lol!

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    I'm sorry, I just saw your post. I will do the best that I can to explain these tests to you.

    1) TSH 3rd generation = thyroid hormone test. Secretion of the thyroid hormone T4 (thyroxine) by the thyroid is regulated by TSH which is, in turn, secreted by the pituitary.First generation TSH assays have detection limits of about 5 to 10 mU/L. Since the normal range for TSH is about 0.5 to 5.0 mU/L, these assays often miss mild hypothyroidism (where the TSH is usually just above 5) and are totally inadequate for assessment of hyperthyroidism (where the TSH is usually below 0.5). As a result, most laboratories have stopped using the first generation TSH assay.

    Second generation TSH assays have a lower detection limit of about 0.1 mU/L. These assays distinguish normal from hypothyroid patients with a high degree of accuracy. Since the detection limit is just below the normal range for TSH of about 0.5 to 5.0 mU/L, these assays can also be used as screening tests to distinguish hyperthyroidism from normal thyroid function. Second generation assays are currently in wide use.

    Third generation TSH assays have become available with detection limits of about 0.01 mU/L. Because of the considerably lower detection limit, these assays can reliably distinguish between normal and hyperthyroid patients. Because the distinction between normal and hyperthyroid patients is usually not a problem, these assays have limited value and are not widely utilized.

    2) hCG/Beta Subunit, Quant = This test is used as a tumor marker for certain cancers. It is used to evaluate and monitor male individuals with testicular tumors. This test is also used to determine the presence of hCG in individuals with gestational trophoblastic disease.

    3) Hep B Surface Antibody= Also known as: HBV; Hep B; anti-HBs; Hepatitis B surface antibody; HBsAg; Hepatitis B surface antigen; HBeAg; Hepatitis B e antigen; anti-HBc; Hepatitis B core antibody; anti-HBc, IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e antibody; HBV DNA - used to detect antibodies produced in response to HBV infection; some detect antigens produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA. Generally, one set of tests is used to determine the cause of acute symptoms while another set of tests may be used after a diagnosis is made, to monitor possible progression of the disease, to detect chronic infection and/or carrier status.

    4) Hep C Antibody = Also known as: Hepatitis C antibody; anti-HCV; HCV recombinant immunoblot assay; HCV RIBA; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C viral load - used to detect and diagnose an infection and/or to monitor the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Detects the presence of antibodies to the virus, indicating exposure to HCV. This test cannot distinguish between someone with an active or a previous HCV infection. Usually, the test is reported as "positive" or "negative." There is some evidence that if the test is "weakly positive," it may be a false positive. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that weakly positive tests be confirmed with the HCV RIBA test before being reported.

    5) HIV-1/0/2 Antibodies = The ADVIA Centaur HIV 1/O/2 Assay is an immunoassay for the qualitative detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (including group 0), and type 2 in human serum and plasma using the ADVIA Centaur Immunoassay System. The ADVIA Centaur HIV assay may be used in conjunction with other serological and clinical information to aid in the diagnosis of individuals with symptoms of HIV type 1 (including Group 0), and type 2 in individuals at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    6) Rheumatoid Arthritis Factor = The rheumatoid factor (RF) test is primarily used to help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other connective tissue diseases, such as Lupus, to distinguish it from other forms of arthritis and other conditions that cause similar symptoms of joint pain, inflammation, and stiffness. It may be ordered along with other autoimmune-related tests, such as an ANA (antinuclear antibody), along with other markers of inflammation, such as a CRP (C-reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), and along with a CBC (Complete Blood Count) to evaluate the body’s blood cells. A CCP (Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibody) test, a relatively new test that can help detect early RA, may be ordered if the RF is negative. The RF test may also be ordered, along with tests such as anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B to help diagnose Sjögren’s syndrome.

    7) RPR = Rapid plasma reagin, a blood test for syphilis that looks for an antibody that is present in the bloodstream when a patient has syphilis. A negative (nonreactive) RPR is compatible with a person not having syphilis, but in the early stages of the disease, the RPR often gives false negative results. Conversely, a false positive RPR can be encountered in infectious mononucleosis, lupus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hepatitis A, leprosy, malaria and, occasionally, pregnancy.

    8) CRP = C Reactive Protein test, is one of the four essential blood tests in determining your risk for developing heart disease and for inflammation disease (such as Lupus). CRP abnormal test results could be an indication of inflammation in the blood.

    9) SSA & SSB antibodies = The SSA antigen is also referred to as the "Ro/SSA" antigen. When SSA is found in combination with the SSB (la) antigen, it commonly points to Sjögren's Syndrome. In the book "The New Sjögren's Syndrome Handbook" author Daniel J. Wallace points out that a patient who tests positive for the SSA and SSB antigens on a blood test for Sjögren's Syndrome usually also tests positive for the antinuclear antigen (ANA). The test that is given to identify SSA and SSB antigens in the blood stream often includes a CBC (complete blood count) as well as a liver and kidney function reading, blood glucose level reading and a Rheumatoid Factor (RF) reading. According to ClinLab Navigator, one tube of blood is needed to perform an SSA blood test, and the findings are recorded as either a positive or negative blood result.

    10) Complement C3 & C4 = The complement system is one of the natural defense mechanisms that protects the human body from infections and perhaps tumors. Quantitative measurement of complement
    components aids in the diagnosis of immunologic disorders, especially those associated with deficiencies of complement components. The clinical presentation of patients with complement abnormalitites usually falls into one of four categories: 1) multisystem rheumatic disease such as systemic lupus erthematosus
    (SLE), 2) glomerulonephritis; 3) hemolytic anemia or, 4) recurrent or overwhelming infections.
    C3 and C4 are used to determine whether deficiencies or abnormalities in the complement system are causing, or contributing to, a disease or condition. Total complement activity (CH50, or CH100) may be ordered to look at the integrity of the entire classical complement pathway. Other complement components are ordered as needed to look for deficiencies

    11) anti ds DNA & Antismith antibodies = Patients with SLE synthesize a variety of different autoantibodies, many of which react with well-characterized nuclear antigens (table 1). Some of these antibodies are also found in patients with other connective tissue diseases. As an example, antibodies to DNA/histone may be seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, anti-RNP antibodies in mixed connective tissue disease, and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies in Sjögren's syndrome. Such antibodies may be present for a few years before clinically apparent disease develops. Several of the other antinuclear antibodies reportedly specific for SLE are found in a small number of patients, and are therefore impractical for use as a screening test
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    With reference to your ANA test:
    If your doctor suspects you have arthritis, he or she may have your blood drawn to determine which type of arthritis you have. In people Lupus, certain tests will help your doctor decide which type you have. The rheumatoid factor, ESR, the CRP, and ANA are used together to make this type of determination.
    The ANA is a blood test that is used in the evaluation of lupus or other connective tissue disorders. It measures the presence of abnormal antibodies. When the ANA is positive, it indicates that someone may have an autoimmune disorder, but alone it can't make the diagnosis. If the ANA is negative, it is very likely that you don't have lupus. The ANA profile is a series of tests consisting of an ANA and other related abnormal antibodies. This may be done if the ANA is found to be positive or possibly at the same time as the ANA.
    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) react with a variety of nucleoproteins (proteins found in the nucleus of cells). In ANA testing, patient serum is allowed to react with a tissue substrate fixed on a slide. Most laboratories employ a HEp-2 cell line (a line of human epithelial cells) as the substrate for this test. The sensitivity of ANA tests can differ when other animal-based substrates are used. Antibodies bound to the nuclei of the substrate are then detected by a second antibody labeled with a fluorescent tag. The results are expressed as the highest titer at which fluorescence is detected. Although titers of 1:20 or 1:40 are commonly reported as positive, titers of 1:320 or higher are usually considered more clinically meaningful. ANA tests are used most often for diagnosis of SLE. In an unselected population, the sensitivity is 98% and specificity 90%. In most labs, ANA is said to be positive if it is greater than 1:160, or if a patient has other symptoms that warrant it.
    A sedimentation rate is common blood test that is used to detect and monitor inflammation in the body. The sedimentation rate is also called the erythrocyte sedimentation rate because it is a measure of the red blood cells (erythrocytes) sedimenting in a tube over a given period of time. Sedimentation rate is often abbreviated as sed rate or ESR.The normal sedimentation rate (Westergren method) for males is 0-15 millimeters per hour, females is 0-20 millimeters per hour. The sedimentation rate can be slightly more elevated in the elderly.
    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is a measurement of the height of the layer of red blood cells that settle in a tube of anti-coagulated blood in a specific unit of time, most commonly one hour. The upper limit of normal for persons 50 years of age and younger is 15 mm per hour in men and 20 mm per hour in women. Over the age of 50, the upper limit of normal for the ESR is 20 mm per hour in men and 30 mm per hour in women.

    I hope that I've answered your questions. Please let me know if you need anything further!

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    wow thank you so much! They did an RNP test also and my result was high, 1.3. so with that positive and the ANA positive can they come to any conclusions? I am guessing if the other tests are in the normal *range* then everything else is ok? MY rhuemy appt is tuedsay and i am hoping he can tell me SOMETHING.

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