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    Default rashes

    I have some rashes and I am based in the UK. It has been hot here but I wondered if anyone else has this? If so, do you know what it is?

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    Hi Coco;
    The classic lupus rash is a redness on the cheeks (malar blush) often brought on by sun exposure. But, we SLE sufferers can get many different rashes for many different reasons. Discoid lupus with the red skin patches on the skin and scaliness is a special characteristic rash that can lead to scarring. It usually occurs on the face and scalp and can lead to loss of scalp hair (alopecia). It is more common in African Americans with lupus. Occasionally, discoid lupus can occur as an isolated skin condition without systemic disease. Hair loss can occur with flares of SLE even without skin rashes in the scalp. In this situation, the hair regrows after the flare is treated. Hair loss can also occur with immunosuppressive medications.
    Here is some information on the different types of rashes that we can get:

    Lupus Rash - Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus
    Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus usually presents as an erythematous rash in a butterfly distribution on the face. This blush is slightly edematous and is located in both cheeks and across the bridge of the nose. The lesion usually appears after sun exposure but persists a few days to weeks before healing without scarring. It may be accompanied by erythematous lesions in other areas of the body. Usually more than 90% of the cases have positive ANA, as well as immunoglobulin deposits along the dermoepidermal junction by immunioflourescence studies of the involved skin.Lupus Rash - Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus lesions may be localized or generalized. The maculopapular rash usually occur after sun exposure, the lesions are usually pruritic. It may involve any place on the body, and because the erythematosus lesions may involve palms and soles they resemble a drug reaction. The great majority of these lesions heal without scarring, however, persistent lesions that become crusty may heal with only slight atrophy of the skin. This type of rash is associated with a high prevalence (70%) of Ro(SS-A) antibodies; however, only 50% of cases have positive immunoglobulin deposition in lesional skin by immunofluorescence.

    Lupus Rash - Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, referred as Discoid Lupus Erythematosus, usually involves the fact, scalp and ears, but it may occur anywhere. The rash may be pruritic. The lesions at the beginning are erythematous, slightly elevated papules or plaques, that in time become raised, bright red, edematous, later on the center becomes depressed, the colour fades and becomes atrophic, while the edematous red periphery slowly enlarges and becomes irregular with some telangiectasias. In older lesions follicular plugging characterized by small round areas of hyperkeratosis are noted. Later on the lesions heal with scar leaving a white area with or without focal hyperpigmentation. These lesions usually heal with scarring and hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation. In the lesion involving the scalp where the lesions are erythematous and scaly, the hair usually grows back, but if the lesion heals with scarring the alopecia in that area is permanent. The names of the different variants reflect the predominant component of the lesion; the tuidus for example refers to raised lesions that are peculiarly soft to the touch, as the feeling to the touch obtained compressing a cotton hall. Only 5-10% of cases have a positive ANA, and immunoglobulin deposits at the dermoepidermal junction are present in 80% of involved skin by immunofluorescence studies, but usually immunofluorescence studies are negative in lesions less than three months old.

    Lupus Rash - Lupus Panniculitis

    Lupus Panniculitis, appears as deep nodules. The lesion is situated below the skin in the subcutaneous tissue, and heals with a deep atrophy of the involved area.

    Lupus Rash - Bullous Lupus Erythematosus

    Bullous Lupus Erythematosus is characterized by the presence of blisters which contain a clear seurous fluid, and may range from 3 to 40mm in diameter. The rash usually appears in sun exposed areas, and only rarely is associated with burning sensation, mild pruritus or redness. Some papules may accompany the blisters. The lesion may resolve spontaneously usually without a scar after a week, but they reappear episodically.

    I hope that this information has been helpful :lol:
    Best of Luck
    Saysusie

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    Thanks for the information. I am seeing a Kidney Specialist tomorrow so I hope he can tell me what it is?

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    Default In English

    I had this translated to regular words...and then my cat stepped on the keyboard and I lost all of it. So, here's a much shorter version:


    Lupus Rash - Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus
    Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus usually presents as a red and swollen rash in a butterfly distribution on the face. This blush is located in both cheeks and across the bridge of the nose. It usually appears after sun exposure but persists a few days to weeks before healing without scarring. It may be accompanied by rashes in other areas of the body.

    Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus lesions may be anywhere and everywhere. The red and bumpy rash usually occurs after sun exposure, the lesions are usually ithcy. The great majority of these rashes heal without scarring, however, if they last for more than a couple of weeks scarring is possible.

    Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, referred as Discoid Lupus Erythematosus, usually involves the face, scalp and ears, but it may occur anywhere. The rash may be itchy. At the beginning are slightly red, swollen and bumpy, or in small circular areas, that in time become raised, bright red and swollen, later on the center becomes depressed, the colour fades and leaves a small white scar, while the swollen red outline slowly enlarges and becomes irregular with some small visible blood vessels. In older lesions hair plugging characterized by small round areas of overgrowth of skin are noted. Later on the rashes heal with the scar leaving a white area with or without a brown dot. These rashes usually heal with scarring and brown or white spots.

    In the rash involving the scalp where the bumps are red and scaly, the hair usually grows back, but if the rash heals with scarring the hair loss in that area is permanent.

    Lupus Rash - Lupus Panniculitis

    Lupus Panniculitis, appears as deep hard bump. The rash is usually below the skin, and leaves a small scar.

    Lupus Rash - Bullous Lupus Erythematosus

    Bullous Lupus Erythematosus is characterized by the presence of blisters which contain a clear watery fluid, and may range from 3 to 40mm in diameter. The rash usually appears in sun exposed areas, and only rarely is associated with burning sensation, mild itchiness or redness. Some bumps may accompany the blisters. The rash may go away by itself usually without a scar after a week, but they reappear episodically.

    Sorry - medical language is a pet peeve of mine. These words usually translate out easily to regular English (like pruritic means itchy), but I'm convinced doctors use these words so that you can't argue with them on the spot and have to go home and look it up.

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    Thanks for that!!!!

    I have also been getting rashes that aren't the typical Lupus rash and was wondering if I was allergic to something or WHAT?

    That was very informative!!! And the translation was EXTREMELY helpful!

    Thanks!
    "All sounds are potentially dangerous.
    All sounds are potentially medicinal.
    All sounds are beautiful." ~Yoko Ono

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