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Thread: Creatanine Kinase & cytokines

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    Default Creatanine Kinase & cytokines

    These are two new medical words I have had to research. Just wanted to know if anyone else knows about them or has them present. I had my blood test come back positive recently with Creatanine Kinase. Everything I read about it tells me it usually means there has been injury or stress to the heart, the brain, or muscle tissue. I asked the Rheumy about it at this point he feels it’s inconclusive because the physical test he performed on my muscles were negative. My concern is why it is present and is it significant to autoimmune diseases? I found a study where they have found links between elevated CK levels and lupus but not too much. Now the Rheumy did tell me in mid-august he would do more labs and would test for capillaries bursting in my brain or something like that. The research I did about that told me about inflammatory proteins called cytokines they cause “brain fog.” So I was curious if anyone has these present in their blood work? I know he said whatever he' looking for may not be good as it could cause blood clots so not sure if its the same I researched but makes sense.

    Thanks!

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    Just wanted you to know that I've read your post and I am hoping that someone who has experienced CK will respond to you. If not, I will be more than happy to do some more research to help you find answers. Let me know.

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    Saysusie
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    hi spanglishqueen,

    so sorry you are going through this scary time....wish you did not have to deal with all of this.

    i do not have any experience with ck, but i know someone will be able to help you find answers...keep us posted.

    hope you are having a good holiday weekend.
    Phyllis

    share a smile today

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    I looked at my labwork copies....I have had the Creatinine Kinase labwork performed. Mine was normal the last time it was performed, 2 years ago. From my recent search, this test is also use to help identify renal failure and RA.

    Increased CK levels may signal dermatomyositis, and sometimes myositis, as well as heart attack. All caused by chronic inflammation too. CK may also be elevated in some people with underactive thyroid gland..all these are possibilities with Lupus..

    So maybe they are jusy looking for the marker in conjunction with the other tests to rule out or in other diseases before giving a hard diagnose.

    This is the literature I found relating to cytokines...
    Cytokines serve as molecular messengers between cells. With regard to arthritis, cytokines regulate various inflammatory responses. Cytokines are often discussed in arthritis research but are not well understood by most patients. What exactly are cytokines? Are there different kinds of cytokines?
    Answer: Cytokines are proteins that are produced by cells. Cytokines interact with cells of the immune system in order to regulate the body's response to disease and infection. Cytokines also mediate normal cellular processes in the body.

    Types of Cytokines

    Cytokines are diverse, meaning, they are not all alike. The body produces different types of cytokines:

    • colony stimulating factors (stimulate production of blood cells)
    • growth and differentiation factors (function primarily in development)
    • immunoregulatory and proinflammatory cytokines (interferon, interleukins, and TNF-alpha that function in the immune system)

    How Cytokines Work

    The immune system is complex -- different types of immune cells and proteins do different jobs. Cytokines are among those proteins. Explaining how cytokines work is difficult. It's a lesson in cell physiology. But to understand inflammation, you must understand the role that cytokines play.


    Cytokines are released by cells into the circulation or directly into tissue. The cytokines locate target immune cells and interact with receptors on the target immune cells by binding to them. The interaction triggers or stimulates specific responses by the target cells.
    Overproduction of Cytokines

    Overproduction or inappropriate production of certain cytokines by the body can result in disease. For example, it has been found that interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are produced in excess in rheumatoid arthritis where they are involved in inflammation and tissue destruction.


    I also found this....

    Cytokines are small secreted proteins which mediate and regulate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. They must be produced de novo in response to an immune stimulus. They generally (although not always) act over short distances and short time spans and at very low concentration. They act by binding to specific membrane receptors, which then signal the cell via second messengers, often tyrosine kinases, to alter its behavior (gene expression). Responses to cytokines include increasing or decreasing expression of membrane proteins (including cytokine receptors), proliferation, and secretion of effector molecules.


    Cytokine is a general name; other names include lymphokine (cytokines made by lymphocytes), monokine (cytokines made by monocytes), chemokine (cytokines with chemotactic activities), and interleukin (cytokines made by one leukocyte and acting on other leukocytes). Cytokines may act on the cells that secrete them (autocrine action), on nearby cells (paracrine action), or in some instances on distant cells (endocrine action).


    I have been tested for lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes in the above paragraphs too..looking for, dunno.


    Hope this helps.
    Love,
    Oluwa
    I have Lupus. So *^#@! what.

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    Spanglishqueen,*Ive never heard of any of those terms but I hope you get some answers soon. And keep us posted. Ill also see what I can find out.


    Chriss
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    Thanks everyone for responding. Oluwa thanks so much for the extra research you found some really good sites. As for the CK they tested my kidneys and renal function and that's good, blood work and listening to heart are okay. They have not done any MRI's on the noggin they are waiting to see how Provigil does. I know the inflammation could be reasons for CK rheumy is not concerned at moment, but in August he wants to do specific labs to test the brain to see if ck or cytokines can be involved further. The fogs aren't horrific, but I'll tell you now if I was still actively practicing law you would not want me arguing on your case because I may not remember what you hired me for

    Good thing is I have been on Provigil for almost a week and I feel a little more alert and less fatigued.

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    Hey Spanglishqueen...

    You're welcome.

    Do you have sleep apnea? Did your doctor juggle the paperwork or does your insurance allow Provigil...My insurance won't cover Provigil unless I have sleep apnea or work the night shift. They don't allow off label prescribing. I have Federal Blue..Blue Cross and they cover alot.

    I was thinking of just purchasing it without the use of my insurance. Expensive...average 300.00 - 350.00 for 30 days...

    Did your doctor fob the paperwork or does your insurance allow Provigil...

    It is wonderful it works for you...I hope one day to rid myself of this nagging fatigue. As of late, I think this is the worse symptom of all, because really you can't fix it with anything... With pain pop a pill...sleepless pop a pill...

    Enjoy this day..
    Love,
    O.
    I have Lupus. So *^#@! what.

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    Oluwa,

    yes I have been diagnoses with mild sleep apnea and I have a C-PAP machine. I know Provigil is extremely hard to get even with the sleep apnea it took 4 months from when it was prescribed until when I got it. I have found since the last week I've been on it I'm more alert and more energetic although I still have the fatigue I am able to do more..which means I push myself and then get fatigued a little--stubborn as a bull I am But I'm working on that.

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