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Thread: Lupus rashes

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    Default Lupus rashes

    People with lupus can develop many different types of skin lesions. Here are some of the most common lesions found in Lupus:

    1) Discoid Lupus - this is the most common form of lesions:
    The coin-shaped ( i.e., "discoid") lesions of DLE are most commonly seen on the scalp and face, but can be seen on other parts of the body as well.
    * Localized DLE: lesions limited to the head, ears, and neck
    * Generalized DLE: lesions present both above and below the neck (generalized DLE carries a slightly increased risk of accompanying SLE).

    Discoid Lupus lesions are often red, scaly, and thickened. As the lesions get older they can produce scarring and discoloration of skin (darkly colored and/or lightly colored areas). When these lesions occur in the scalp, hair loss (alopecia) can result. Discoid Lupus lesions are usually painless and typically do not itch. Skin cancer can occasionally develop in long-standing DLE lesions; therefore, any changes in a long-standing lesion should be brought to your doctor's attention.

    2) Lupus profundus
    Discoid Lupus lesions may also occur in conjunction with firm lumps in the fatty tissue underlying the skin (panniculitis). This form of panniculitis is called lupus profundus.

    3) Mucosal DLE is the name given to the lesions that occasionally occur in the mucus membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes.

    4) Palmar-plantar DLE is the name given to the lesions that occasionally occur on the hands and feet.

    5) Subacute Cutaneous LE (SCLE) -There are two clinical forms of SCLE lesions:
    a) The papulosquamous variety of SCLE is characterized by red (erythematous) plaques-elevated areas of scaly skin with distinct margins.
    This form of SCLE can resemble psoriasis. These lesions appear most commonly on the sun-exposed areas of the arms, shoulders, neck and trunk, with the face being affected less frequently.
    b) The other form of SCLE consists of red annular (ring-shaped) lesions occurring on the same parts of the body.

    Both forms of SCLE are characteristically very photosensitive. This means they get worse when exposed to sunlight or artificial sources of ultraviolet light.
    Unlike Discoid Lupus, SCLE lesions do not scar. However, they can produce areas of light or dark skin discoloration. As with other forms of cutaneous LE, SCLE lesions usually do not itch.

    Here is a web site with some pictures of different Lupus Lesions. If any of these look like yours, then perhaps you are dealing with a form of Lupus lesion. It might be a good idea to speak with your doctor about this so that a treatment can be recommended.

    I wish you the best!
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    Saysusie, what is the name of the website that you were referring to?
    As long as this body works, I am going to enjoy life to the fullest for each second of every moment that I can.



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    Great information. I have Lupus SLE. I get rashes on my joints, on my scalp and along my hairline. Very sensitive to sun exposure. It is not fun.

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    Can't believe that I forgot to put the links in my post. Here they are:

    http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/ui/tray/dle-004.html

    http://www.omnimedicalsearch.com/im_...+pictures.html
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkatcandybar View Post
    Great information. I have Lupus SLE. I get rashes on my joints, on my scalp and along my hairline. Very sensitive to sun exposure. It is not fun.
    I also get rashes along my hairline, usually around menstration time though.

    I am not DX yet, my ANA keeps coming up neg so they won't test further.

    anyways, I am wondering if anyone has both Rosacea and maler rashes at the same time?

    One doc told me my rash can't be a lupus rash because it goes into the folds where the nose meets the cheeks.

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    Unfortunately, I have not been able to distinguish very well between lupus rashes and psoriasis rashes no matter how many internet pics I look at. I allegedly have both with doctors in disagreement over what the rashes really are.

    A couple of my rashes were confirmed to be psoriasis. Another was thought to be lupus but not confirmed by biopsy. Nevertheless, two (2) dermatologists thought it was lupus based on distribution across the face. Leads me to question the fallibility of skin biopsies.
    Symptoms: Skin rashes/bloodwork (sometimes)
    Medications: Imuran/plaquenil/Allopurinol/BP meds

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    You should question the fallibility of everything! If the doctors are contradicted, insist that they look more closely so that they can prescribe the correct treatment for your rash. You are doing the right thing by learning as much as you can about your body and your symptoms. Keep up the good work and continue to be proactive with your doctors!

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    Hillbillie (08-02-2010)

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    Yes, one needs to question the fallabilities of everything. Does this mean one needs to keep going to see their doctor who can't figure out whether it's lupus or psoriasis?

    This is the very thing I don't agree. More visits equals more expenses? More visits equals more confusion? You get one drug today and maybe a different type tomorrow? Maybe two more!

    I have been trying to point out since the beginning of this year that there is a med that's already in the market for over 8 years, yet no one seem to know or care for it.

    But then I realize that no one would dare use it because their doctors (who have no knowledge of it) would rather dictate what is good for their patients. Aha...steroids. The other other problem is everyone seem to be "broke".

    Broke because they have no jobs, or because the govt's health plan suck!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tsk0866 View Post
    Yes, one needs to question the fallabilities of everything. Does this mean one needs to keep going to see their doctor who can't figure out whether it's lupus or psoriasis?

    This is the very thing I don't agree. More visits equals more expenses? More visits equals more confusion? You get one drug today and maybe a different type tomorrow? Maybe two more!

    I have been trying to point out since the beginning of this year that there is a med that's already in the market for over 8 years, yet no one seem to know or care for it.

    But then I realize that no one would dare use it because their doctors (who have no knowledge of it) would rather dictate what is good for their patients. Aha...steroids. The other other problem is everyone seem to be "broke".

    Broke because they have no jobs, or because the govt's health plan suck!!
    Hello tsk0866,

    Autoimmune disorders are complex things, and there are rarely, if ever, simple solutions for disorders like Lupus. Hence, the multiple drug approach. I have SLE, and MS, and I take three different drugs on a regular basis that keep me not only alive, but make me a fairly happy, viable, productive person. Without those meds, I could very well be dead today.

    As far as Doctor's go, well, I agree, they can be very counterproductive for their patients. That's why becoming educated, and becoming ones own advocate is so important. If you have a terrible Dr./Rheumo, fire them, and find another until you come across someone who works with you, rather than the type you mention who dictates to you. It can be maddeningly difficult to find a good one, but there are some outstanding healthcare pro's out there, you just have to really look hard sometimes.

    If there is some sort of medication out there that I believed could help me, I would certainly research it, and upon finding clinical trials that show promise, and/or peer reviewed articles in reputable scientific or medical journals indicating possible benefits for someone with my various conditions, I would tell my Dr. that I would like to try it. We would talk it over, and upon explaining the possible pro's or con's, we would decide together if it was worth trying.

    I regards to Govt. health plans, I can only speak for those of us in the USA. The system is in dire need of reform, there's no arguing that. I hope our elected leaders can come up with a workable reform that can positively benefit the maximum number of people. Since that's a work in progress, we'll have to wait and see.

    Rob
    Last edited by rob; 12-26-2009 at 02:36 PM.

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    Over Christmas I developed a rash on my chest and stomach. It burned like fire. So I called my rheumy. I started calling at 8:30, because that is when they open. There was no answer for 2 hrs. When I finally got though I had to leave a message. When they finely called back they told me to call my PCP. I didn't like it at all. So I call my PCP. They told me to call my rheumy. I told them I already did. They told me if it's a lupus rash I need to see the rheumy. So I called back and told them what they said. So then they told me to come in. I think if I have a lupus problem, the rheumy should see me to document my symptoms. He said he thinks my rash is lupus related. And the rash on my stomach was infected from rubbing it to much. He said if it comes back he want me to the dermatologist for a biopsy. He wrote me a prescription for cream to rub on and a antibiotic
    But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. Isaiah 40:31

    Take Care,
    Becky

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