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    Default Lupus rashes

    People with lupus can develop many different types of skin lesions. Here are some of the most common lesions found in Lupus:

    1) Discoid Lupus - this is the most common form of lesions:
    The coin-shaped ( i.e., "discoid") lesions of DLE are most commonly seen on the scalp and face, but can be seen on other parts of the body as well.
    * Localized DLE: lesions limited to the head, ears, and neck
    * Generalized DLE: lesions present both above and below the neck (generalized DLE carries a slightly increased risk of accompanying SLE).

    Discoid Lupus lesions are often red, scaly, and thickened. As the lesions get older they can produce scarring and discoloration of skin (darkly colored and/or lightly colored areas). When these lesions occur in the scalp, hair loss (alopecia) can result. Discoid Lupus lesions are usually painless and typically do not itch. Skin cancer can occasionally develop in long-standing DLE lesions; therefore, any changes in a long-standing lesion should be brought to your doctor's attention.

    2) Lupus profundus
    Discoid Lupus lesions may also occur in conjunction with firm lumps in the fatty tissue underlying the skin (panniculitis). This form of panniculitis is called lupus profundus.

    3) Mucosal DLE is the name given to the lesions that occasionally occur in the mucus membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes.

    4) Palmar-plantar DLE is the name given to the lesions that occasionally occur on the hands and feet.

    5) Subacute Cutaneous LE (SCLE) -There are two clinical forms of SCLE lesions:
    a) The papulosquamous variety of SCLE is characterized by red (erythematous) plaques-elevated areas of scaly skin with distinct margins.
    This form of SCLE can resemble psoriasis. These lesions appear most commonly on the sun-exposed areas of the arms, shoulders, neck and trunk, with the face being affected less frequently.
    b) The other form of SCLE consists of red annular (ring-shaped) lesions occurring on the same parts of the body.

    Both forms of SCLE are characteristically very photosensitive. This means they get worse when exposed to sunlight or artificial sources of ultraviolet light.
    Unlike Discoid Lupus, SCLE lesions do not scar. However, they can produce areas of light or dark skin discoloration. As with other forms of cutaneous LE, SCLE lesions usually do not itch.

    Here is a web site with some pictures of different Lupus Lesions. If any of these look like yours, then perhaps you are dealing with a form of Lupus lesion. It might be a good idea to speak with your doctor about this so that a treatment can be recommended.

    I wish you the best!
    Peace and Blessings
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    Saysusie
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    Saysusie, what is the name of the website that you were referring to?
    As long as this body works, I am going to enjoy life to the fullest for each second of every moment that I can.



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    Great information. I have Lupus SLE. I get rashes on my joints, on my scalp and along my hairline. Very sensitive to sun exposure. It is not fun.

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    Can't believe that I forgot to put the links in my post. Here they are:

    http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/ui/tray/dle-004.html

    http://www.omnimedicalsearch.com/im_...+pictures.html
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    hi im berniece, i m new here. about 2 years ago i had about 100 open body ulcers covering all sides of my body. from my armpits, palm of my hands butt cheeks etc. it was horrible. it was at first diagnosed as pyoderma gangrinosum, but was found to be the sle doing a different thing all along. finally after 3 biopsies a couple of months to a yr later they healed by using calmoseptine, tegederm and high doeses of prednisone. but i had a hospital bed trapeze home nursing too. i was in bad shape and on 60mg or so of pred. which caused heart problems subsequently. but the ulcers try to come back here and there but now i know to be vigilant over my body and to use calmoseptine and tegederm. i havent heard of anyone saying they had anything like this. now i have thick black scaley patches on my hand n feet. i saw from your link that it is lupus too. im wondering is there anyone else with the ulcer issues?

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    Hello, all! I'm Krystle, and I just recently had this open, thing on my finger that I can't understand what it is. My mom was also diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder as she tested ANA positive. This rash on my finger doesn't itch, but to me it looks like the skin is so dry that it cracks and bleeds. My mom doesn't have these symptoms but she does get rash. Also when I was younger, if I was in the heat for too long I used to get heat rash on my inner thighs really badly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkatcandybar View Post
    Great information. I have Lupus SLE. I get rashes on my joints, on my scalp and along my hairline. Very sensitive to sun exposure. It is not fun.
    I also get rashes along my hairline, usually around menstration time though.

    I am not DX yet, my ANA keeps coming up neg so they won't test further.

    anyways, I am wondering if anyone has both Rosacea and maler rashes at the same time?

    One doc told me my rash can't be a lupus rash because it goes into the folds where the nose meets the cheeks.

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    Unfortunately, I have not been able to distinguish very well between lupus rashes and psoriasis rashes no matter how many internet pics I look at. I allegedly have both with doctors in disagreement over what the rashes really are.

    A couple of my rashes were confirmed to be psoriasis. Another was thought to be lupus but not confirmed by biopsy. Nevertheless, two (2) dermatologists thought it was lupus based on distribution across the face. Leads me to question the fallibility of skin biopsies.
    Symptoms: Skin rashes/bloodwork (sometimes)
    Medications: Imuran/plaquenil/Allopurinol/BP meds

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    You should question the fallibility of everything! If the doctors are contradicted, insist that they look more closely so that they can prescribe the correct treatment for your rash. You are doing the right thing by learning as much as you can about your body and your symptoms. Keep up the good work and continue to be proactive with your doctors!

    Peace and Blessings
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    Saysusie
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    Yes, one needs to question the fallabilities of everything. Does this mean one needs to keep going to see their doctor who can't figure out whether it's lupus or psoriasis?

    This is the very thing I don't agree. More visits equals more expenses? More visits equals more confusion? You get one drug today and maybe a different type tomorrow? Maybe two more!

    I have been trying to point out since the beginning of this year that there is a med that's already in the market for over 8 years, yet no one seem to know or care for it.

    But then I realize that no one would dare use it because their doctors (who have no knowledge of it) would rather dictate what is good for their patients. Aha...steroids. The other other problem is everyone seem to be "broke".

    Broke because they have no jobs, or because the govt's health plan suck!!

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