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    arugh -
    I had a positive ana test and dr ordered the ana subset of tests. I went in Friday morning and gave the test blood - how long does it take? What is it going to tell - maybe I don't have lupus? My sissy has RA but I tested neg fo rthe rumitoid factor.

    anxious

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    Each lab has its own time line for reporting the results of tests. Since your ANA was positive, doctors now need to run other tests to see if you have an auto-immune disorder and to try to ascertain which one it might be.
    Most likely, he ordered other autoantiboidies tests. Autoantibodies are a group of antibodies (immune proteins) that mistakenly target and damage specific tissues or organs of the body. The type of autoimmune disorder or disease that occurs and the amount of destruction done to the body depends on which systems or organs are targeted by the autoantibodies. Disorders caused by autoantibodies that primarily affect a single organ, such as the thyroid in Graves’ disease or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, are often the easiest to diagnose as they frequently present with organ-related symptoms. However, disorders due to systemic autoantibodies (affects multiple organs or systems in the body, as does Lupus) can be much more difficult. To complicate the situation, some diseases, like Lupus, may have more than one autoantibody, and/or they may have more than one autoimmune disorder, and/or have an autoimmune disorder without a detectable level of an autoantibody. This may make it difficult for the doctor to identify the prime cause and arrive at a diagnosis.

    Other laboratory tests associated with presence of inflammation, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate: also known as Sed rate, Sedimentation rate (ESR) and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) may also be ordered. In diseases that cause inflammation, the levels of these tests are usually high.

    You doctor will have to use the results of all of these tests, as well as your symptoms and your medical history before he will be able to make any type of diagnosis.

    I hope that I've answered your question. Please let me know if you need anything further.

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    Saysusie
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    thank you for your reply Saysusie -

    I'm trying to piece it together and I appreciate the explainations.

    I have my lab test now (got them last night) but dr didn't have time to meet me - just reffered me to a rhumatologist who has a two week wait. So I picked up the tests and am researching the meanings. My gp did not dx me.

    I am neg for almost everything, have a low 1:8 titter, speckled. She circled one thing which I can't figure out yet DSDNA - came in at 5.3 - and I appear to be slighly anemic RBC slightly low. All else is in normal range (not surprised the tests you mention for inflamation are normal as I'm feeling pretty good right now, tho do have some inflamation in my hand)

    I guess I will see what the Rhumatologist says.

    thank you for the reply and all your thoughtful information, Saysusie -

    take care.

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    If the test is done correctly, a strongly positive dsDNA indicates lupus. Unlike the ANA, a positive dsDNA is not found in otherwise healthy individuals. The positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) test and the presence of autoantibodies to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) were established as two of the possible eleven criteria needed for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). For this reason, it has become an increasingly common occurrence for a doctor to order both an ANA and a dsDNA test at the same time.
    It appears that your ANA was positive as well as your DSDNA. These two are usually indicators of Lupus. You can be positive for Lupus without suffering inflammation (that is a good thing). Inflammation can occur in your muscles, your joints and in your internal organs. Apparently, you have not problems with your internal organs and your doctors will want to keep things this way.
    Make sure that you discuss all of your test results with your rheumatologist and ask him/her to explain the significance of each result. Until then, we will help you as much as we can.

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    Saysusie
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