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Thread: St. Vitus Dance and a relationship to Lupus and other AI's?

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    Default St. Vitus Dance and a relationship to Lupus and other AI's?

    Hey all,
    I am wondering if anyone else in here had a relative that had a condition called St. Vitus Dance. I know that this is the old fashioned name for the disease, but I can not remember the new name for it. My mother had this as a child and outgrew it. I am wondering if there is a relationship between this condition and Lupus and the other auto-immune diseases. I am just wondering is all.

    Hugs,
    Kathy
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

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    Hi Kathy;
    St Vitus' Dance is also known as Sydenham's chorea. This is a disorder that occurs in children and is associated with rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever is an acute infectious disease caused by certain types of streptococci bacteria. It usually starts with strep throat or tonsillitis. These types of streptococci are able to cause disease throughout the body. The most serious damage caused by rheumatic fever is to the valves in the heart. At one time, rheumatic fever was the most common cause of damaged heart valves, and it still is in most developing countries around the world. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are still present in America, but the incidence has dropped substantially. Rheumatic fever may appear in several different forms. St. Vitus' dance, is one of five "major criteria" for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever

    The only relationship that I could find between Sydenham's chorea and Lupus were in brain involvement with Lupus. In general there are two main causes of brain disease in lupus. The first is lupus disease itself which can cause alterations in the brain activity. The second is the clotting disorder associated with some lupus patients, the antiphospholipid or Hughes syndrome (sticky blood).

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), also known as Hughes syndrome. Because one of the main features includes thrombosis (blood clotting), the name 'sticky blood syndrome' has often been used as a shorthand to describe this condition. The brain appears to be particularly sensitive to the clotting. In fact, in many patients, headaches precede clotting for many years. Also, individuals may develop slight speech disturbance, suggestive of a mini-stroke or epilepsy. Other forms of brain abnormality include movement disorders,and fits. Epilepsy in all its forms, from petit mal (absences) through to grand mat (fits), are important features of Hughes syndrome also.

    Lupus: Movement Disorders & Fits:
    Sometimes brain involvement in Lupus manifests as movement disorders and/or fits. Often, lupus first starts in the most dramatic way with a seizure or a series of epileptic fits. This is usually when the patient is untreated and the disease fairly active. It is sometimes associated with high fever. Fits or seizures are one of the non-specific ways the brain reacts to severe illness. Once the lupus is treated further, fits are the exception rather than the rule. The same applies to movement disorders. Occasionally patients develop chorea (St Vitus Dance) with jerky hand movements or head movements. This is simply a manifestation of abnormal brain function and, once again, is often associated with the 'sticky blood' (Hughes) syndrome.

    I hope that I've answered your question. Please let me know if you need anything more.

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Hi Saysusie,
    You have answered my questions concerning this illness. My mother just told us that it made her lose control of her hand movements for the most part. I don't have any clotting problems with the Lupus that I know of, but I did have Pre-Eclampsia and Gestational Diabetes with my first pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes with my second pregnancy. I was not diagnosed at the time with the Lupus, but the doctors warned me to watch out for type 2 diabetes in my 40's or 50's. You did answer my questions about this condition.

    Hugs,
    Kathy
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

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    I'm glad that I was able to answer your question. I'm also glad that you've had no issues with clotting or sticky blood.
    I was told to be careful about diabetes as I aged (when I was in my 30's). I immediately began to take precautions (reducing or almost eliminating sugar from my diet, exercising more, eating a healthier diet etc.). My numbers have remained good so far (knock on wood). It might not be a bad idea for you to start making some changes now in order to help yourself avoid problems in the future.
    Take Very Good Care Of Yourself :P

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Hi Saysusie,
    I hear you about trying to avoid diabetes. I have been seriously watching the amount of sugar in my diet big time. I am also having to do a serious diet change as they now believe that I have Celiac Spru. The doctor states that since my twin sister has this and that I am having the same symptoms of chronic diarrhea and digestion problems that he believes now that I have Celiac Spru. Some blood test for the antibodies for this showed pos so he told me that I have to go on a special diet. I have to emimate glutan, wheat, barly and oats from my diet big time. I am no longer allowed to eat anything from a can or a box and the veges have to be fresh or frozen and the same with fruits. It is unreal. I don't know if I am going to be able to follow this diet as I like food. It is very distressing and due to this my weight is dropping pretty fast. My Rheumatologist wants me to go and have a biopsy done on my small intestines, but I don't know if I want to do that. I mean the antibodies are pos, so why go through that mess. I am very upset by this news. The doctor thinks that the Pernicious Anemia (Megaloblastic) Anemia is being caused by the Celiacs and not the Lupus. Do you have any information on this? I told the doctor that I was very upset by all of this and that I have to wonder what else is going to go wrong. He put me on an antidepressent for awhile. I will be ok, but it is just depressing big time.

    Hugs,
    Kathy
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

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    Hi Kathy;
    I am sorry to hear about all of these complications. Your gluten-free diet does sound a bit excruciating. But, the alternative is far more undesirable. There are a large number of sites on the internet for a gluten-free diet. Perhaps there might be some ideas that will help to make the diet a bit more palatable.
    When I had thyroid cancer, I had to go on an iodine-free diet. I never knew how many food products had iodine (of some form) in them - almost everything does! That was such a restrictive diet that I ended up eating grilled chicken breasts and fresh grilled vegetables every day (no seasoning, no sauces, no cooking oils, no bread, no butter, etc. etc. etc.). So, in a sense, I know how you feel. I found several web-sites with interesting recipes and was able to make meals that were quite tasty. Perhaps you can do the same.

    Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate a protein called gluten (or a gluten fraction called gliadin), which is found in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. About 10% of an affected person's first-degree relatives (parents, siblings or children) will also have the disease. It has also been estimated that up to 20% of Americans have the disease to some degree.

    There is increasing evidence that most people with gluten sensitivity have latent celiac disease with such mild manifestations in the digestive tract that the diagnosis is never made. An allergy or intolerance to specific grains, such as wheat, may be due to a gluten sensitivity, but may occur for other reasons as well.

    Celiac disease does occur as an overlapping disease with Lupus. It is considered an autoimmune disorder because the body's own immune system causes the damage (as is the case with Lupus). People with celiac disease tend to have other autoimmune diseases. The connection between celiac disease and these diseases may be genetic. These diseases also include: thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, liver disease, collagen vascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjögren’s syndrome.

    While the gastrointestinal tract is the primary target organ, systemic disease is an important consequence of gluten ingestion in many patients. Latent disease may manifest itself as irritable bowel syndrome with iron deficiency anemia, but little or no diarrhea. The longer a person goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of developing malnutrition and other complications.

    Blood disorders are common in lupus and they can be very important.
    The principal hematological (blood) issues of interest are:
    * Anemia: low hemoglobin or red blood cells
    * Thrombosis: excess blood clotting
    * Blood transfusion
    * Bone marrow testing
    But, if you are manifesting with signs and symptoms of Celiac, I would tend to agree with your doctor - that it is the Celiac that is causing your anemia more than the Lupus.

    I hope that you find a way to make things a bit more tolerable. In the meantime, we are always here to help if we can.

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Hi Saysusie,
    Thank you so much for the information. My twin sister also has Celiac Spru, but no Lupus or anything like that with her. She has none of the symptoms of Sjogrens or Lupus. She is not sun sensitive or anything like me. It is unreal. I mean I am happy for her and hope nothing bad like that is happening with me happens to her. I am very glad for the information that you have given me. I am looking on the net for the diet and have printed several off for me. I have to get this all under control and in the prospective and I will be ok.

    Hugs,
    Kathy
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

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