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Thread: poor sleep

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    Default poor sleep

    I was dxed in Feb but not much has been done regarding treatment.
    I also have hypothyroid and Addison's disease (adrenal failure)
    I am having a rough go
    My father is battleing cancer, I am a main caregiver besides my mom
    The stress and fatigue started a flare about a month ago
    I don't know much about lupus as far as control or living with it but I do know from my own experiance that sleep is very important
    I'm not doing so good in that department. My legs seem so restless and wiggely, my sinus and toungue hurt allot and are very dry
    I was told I had sjogren's too but then was told that it didn't matter what I called my problem as it is all the same thing....
    So how do I get some sleep?
    Thanks Sandra

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    If you are on Prednisone, it can cause sleeplessness - I try to take mine in the morning. I also try to make a little bedtime ritual that is relaxing (whatever does it for you....warm bath, tea, reading). The TV can definitely keep you up later. I don't know what else, but good luck!

    Missy

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    Hi Jean;
    Missy's suggestions were right on. Here are some more helpful tips. Avoid bed-time snacks, particularly grains and sugars. These will raise blood sugar levels and make sleep difficult. Later, when blood sugar levels drop too low (hypoglycemia), you might wake up and not be able to fall back asleep.Do not watch television or do any work in bed. Go to bed as early as possible. Our body systems, particularly the adrenal glands, do a majority of their recovering during the hours of 11PM and 1AM. In addition, your gallbladder dumps toxins during this same time period. If you are awake, those toxins back up into the liver which then secondarily back up into your entire system and cause further disruption to your health. So aim to be in your bed with the lights out between 9:30 P.M. and 10:30 P.M. If you are not used to getting to bed this early, move your bedtime up by 30 minutes every week until you are in bed by 10:30 P.M. For example, if you usually watch television until midnight, try turning off the TV by 11:30. Stay away from alcohol. Although alcohol makes people drowsy, its effect is short-lived and people will often wake up a few hours later, unable to fall back to sleep. Alcohol will also prevent you from falling into the deeper stages of sleep, where the body does most of its healing. Avoid foods which you may be sensitive to. This is particularly true for dairy and wheat products, because they may have an effect on your sleep, such as causing apnea, gastrointestinal upset, excess congestion, and gas, among others. Sleep in COMPLETE DARKNESS or as close to it as possible. When light hits the eyes, it disrupts the circadian rhythm of the pineal gland and the production of melatonin and seratonin.
    I hope that this has been helpful to you. Best of Luck :lol:
    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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