Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 44

Thread: Can we post pics of the face rash?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    88
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    I wonder also if it is sle related,

    and I too want to know "IT" is....I have seen posts with that referenced. 8)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    256
    Thanked 147 Times in 78 Posts

    Default

    I am the guilty one, IT started with , er, ah me. It seems to have caught on..now some of us' word for Lupus....IT has IT's own entity to me. My way of dealing with IT...IT is not who I am, nor does IT define me..IT just follows me from room to room.

    Times I can ignore IT, times IT hides in the shadow lurking..but yet IT is always there...waiting for more stress to thrive on...

    IT isn't a friend I like, but I accept IT as who IT is. A pain in the aszzz.



    Silly...
    Oluwa

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    256
    Thanked 147 Times in 78 Posts

    Default

    Hey...you two..

    Having IT has a myriad of symptoms, some not directly related to IT, some are..the key is to rule out other possibilities and to treat the symptom...

    Yep, we get rashes..I am known to have a scabby hinder..and crud above my navel on my tummy. A little dab of steroid cream will do ya...

    Related to IT, I don't know...but the prescription rids it when it happens..

    Is it IT? I would say so...we gets hives, lesions, pigment changes, loss of pigment, more pigment...rashes, nose ulcers, vascular rashes, black and blue marks, blisters but then there are other skin diseases and people who do not have IT can get these also...the key is to rule out the other diseases before claiming it as IT's havoc...

    Hope I helped instead of confused...
    Hugs,
    Oluwa

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    256
    Thanked 147 Times in 78 Posts

    Default

    FYI...www.lupus.org...

    Lupus of the Skin

    10. What are the symptoms of cutaneous lupus?

    The symptoms of cutaneous lupus may include a variety of different looking skin rashes, photosensitivity (where exposure to ultra-violet light triggers a rash), and sometimes ulcers on the inside of the nose or mouth.
    See: Skin Disease and Lupus

    What do the rashes look like?

    There are a variety of ways that cutaneous lupus rashes can appear. The distinctive rash is called the "butterfly rash," which is a rash that extends across the cheeks of the face and the bridge of the nose. It can be flat or raised; it can be bright red or it can be just a mild blushing, light pink coloration to the skin. It appears on the face in a pattern that looks like a butterfly; the wings are beneath both eyes and the body of the butterfly covers the bridge of the nose. Here is one example of what a butterfly rash may look like. (Photo source: Dept. of Dermatology, University of Iowa)

    Another classic rash found in cutaneous lupus is the discoid rash. This rash is coin-shaped or oval in shape, like a disk and it is seen on areas of the skin that are exposed to sunlight. Discoid lesions (sores) tend to be red and raised and become scaly. When they heal they can leave behind a scar. These rashes can also result in a change in coloring of the skin, making the area around the lesion either lighter or darker in color. These discoid lesions may appear on the scalp; on the face in a butterfly distribution; or, as mentioned earlier, in areas where the skin receives sun exposure, especially, for example, the V of the neck. Discoid lupus erythematosus (LE) lesions are usually painless and typically do not itch. Here is one example of what a discoid rash may look like. (Photo source: Dermatology Information System, Dermis.net)

    Chronic cutaneous lupus may also appear in different forms including:

    1. verrucous (wart-like) discoid LE
    2. lupus tumidus - elevated areas of red skin with no scale or scarring
    3. lupus profundus - discoid skin lesions in conjunction with panniculitis
    4. palmar-plantar erosive discoid LE - discoid lesions on the hands and feet

    Another type of lupus skin rash is classified as the subacute cutaneous lesions. These are lesions characterized by redness. They are also coin-shaped, very photosensitive and they get worse when exposed to ultra-violet light. These are lesions that do not leave behind scars, and can appear over large areas of the body. People who have subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE-a subset of cutaneous lupus) may experience systemic symptoms such as:

    * muscle and joint pain,
    * fever and
    * general discomfort.

    Serious kidney or nervous system problems are rare.

    These are just a few examples of what cutaneous lupus rashes may look like. Because the appearance of skin rashes in lupus can be quite variable, it can be difficult to diagnose just by looking at the lesion, and therefore other tests may be necessary.

    How is cutaneous lupus diagnosed?

    Cutaneous lupus, because of the great deal of variability in the way that the skin rashes may appear, can be quite difficult to diagnose. However, a skin biopsy may be performed and this may be diagnostic.

    That kind of Doctor specializes in cutaneous lupus?

    A dermatologist specializes in diseases of the skin, hair and nails. Cutaneous lupus is one of hundreds of diseases that involve these areas.

    How is cutaneous lupus treated?

    Treatment of cutaneous lupus may include corticosteroid creams or ointments applied to the rash or lesions. If the lesion does not respond to cream or ointment, the doctor may prescribe injections of corticosteroids directly into the lesion. If a person has particularly widespread lesions, oral corticosteroid medications may be prescribed or the doctor may prescribe anti-malarial medications such as Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine).

    In addition to these medications, sunscreens are an important part of the prevention of photosensitivity (where skin exposed to ultra-violet light reacts by developing a rash) reactions that may occur with cutaneous lupus lesions.
    See: Skin Disease in Lupus.

    11. How is cutaneous lupus different from systemic lupus?

    Cutaneous lupus is confined to the skin, whereas systemic lupus may involve not only the skin but any of the other organ systems in the body.

    Can cutaneous lupus turn into systemic lupus?

    In approximately 10% of the cases of cutaneous lupus, it evolves and develops into systemic lupus. However, this can't be predicted or prevented from happening.
    See: Skin Disease in Lupus

    12. I have hair loss due to several scars on my scalp. All are about the size of silver dollars. Is there anything to help this kind of hair loss?

    If biopsy results indicate advanced scarring on the scalp, then there is little chance of bringing back significant amounts of hair. If, on the other hand, scarring is not prevalent, then treatment with corticosteroid and/or antimalarial drugs may be successful in getting the hair to return. When the disease is inactive, and scarring is not present hair usually grows back.
    See: Skin Disease in Lupus

    Will the drugs used to treat baldness help the hair loss due to lupus?

    Suppressing the disease with medication helps hair to re-grow.

    13. Is there anything that can be done to cover the lesions (sores) that show-up on my face?

    Yes. There are make-up products available commercially which may be helpful in this situation. Fallene's Total BlockŪ SPF 60 Foundation can be used as a make-up as well as a sun block.

    Total Block
    Fallene, Ltd.
    677 West De Kalb Pike
    King of Prussia, PA 19406
    1-800-332-5536
    http://www.totalblock.com/

    Covermark Cosmetics
    157 Veterans Drive, Suite D
    Northvale, NJ 07647
    1-800-524-1120
    www.covermarkusa.com/

    14. Can lupus cause either hives or a sensation of burning in the skin?

    Lupus may cause hives. Itching can also occur but this is not a common finding. The sensation of itching is due to irritation of nerve fibers in the skin. If the irritation is more intense, it may cause a burning sensation.

    15. What is photosensitivity and what are photosensitivity reactions?

    Photosensitivity is sensitivity to the UV (ultra-violet) rays from the sunlight and other UV light sources. Photosensitivity reactions typically include a rash, but may also trigger fever, fatigue, joint pain and other symptoms of SLE. In some cases, sun exposure has resulted in the onset of kidney disease.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, USA
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    256
    Thanked 147 Times in 78 Posts

    Default

    Follow the link for more skin related paragraphs, issues, types and etc...

    http://www.lupus.org/webmodules/weba...=103&zoneid=76


    O.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Ahhhhhh!!!! Thank you for the "IT" explanation! I guess you could say IT was driving me crazy!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    915
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Maybe I can try to post a picture of what the rash I suffer from Pompholix looks like on my hands and feet. I will try it and see. . I hope that this works this time.
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Quincy Ma
    Posts
    505
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Wow Kathy -

    That rash looks almost like blisters from a burn...Does it hurt? ouch.. I hope its a painless rash. It looks alot like a viral infection I get on my face alot, but in a smaller area. I really hope that doesnt hurt.....
    lauri
    For God has not given us a spirit of fear; but of power, love and a sound mind. 2 Timothy 1:7

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    915
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Yes I can finally post pictures. This is what the rash looks like on my hands and feet. Oluwa sent me the url for the site and it shows very clearly what the rash is like that I get on my hands and feet. I started getting this type of rash at the age of 14 and have had problems with it all the rest of my life thus far. My Rheumatologist put me on imuran and that helps a lot and slows the severity and amount of flares of this. I also have Lupus (SLE). Here is a picture of what my feet look like at times.

    [img]

    Kathy[/img]
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    915
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Laurid,

    This rash I get itch and they hurt when the blisters break opened and drain and then they crust up and the skin flakes off. It does not leave a permanent scar thank heavens. Once I got diagnosed with SLE, my Rheumatologist first put me on Dapsone along with the Lupus medications and that worked to clear it up for a long time and then for some reason my body rejected the Dapsone, so he switched me to Imuran and that helps a lot. He said that I will have this problem all of my life and that he believes that it is indirectly related to the Lupus and Sjogrens. I just wanted to let everyone see what I have had to deal with for so many years.

    Hugs,
    Kathy
    Lupus for many years. Like most of my life. Sjogrens that started at 35 and Scoliosis, Spinal Stenosis, Degenerative Disc Disease, Osteo-Arthritis of the spine, Ankylosing Spondilitis, Periferal Neuropathy, mild CP and now just recently diagnosed with PA. I had a disc replaced in December of 2007.

    Medications:
    Plaquenil, Sulindac, Imuran, Celiac diet, Tramadol and B12 shot once a month.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •