Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Motor Skills

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Motor Skills

    Hey everyone,

    I was dx with Lupus in Jan 07, but it wasn't till this summer that I have really been feeling... different? Not myself?

    I have two things going on, and just wanted to bounce it off of everyone to see if it is Lupus or just me going crazy.

    Before I would spend time in the sun, and my skin would be "splotchy". This past weekend I was outside with SPF 30 and within 15 minutes my legs and arms were covered in a rash. The next day I was outside with SPF 85, and just felt my face starting to rash a little.

    Now, a few days later, my skin has been breaking out in these patches of small-to medium size bumps... and they itch like crazy for a good 10 minutes. Than after an hour or so, they turn into faint small bumps. If you run your hand over my arms and legs, you feel them. Later, it was repeat in a different location.

    Is that because of being in the sun?

    Also, does Lupus affect your motor skills? I have been dropping stuff all the time lately. I was putting ice cream away at my grandmothers, I was holding it with BOTH hands... and suddenly it was on the floor... I have no idea how it happened! And its been happening a lot. Things just won't be in my hands anymore. I'm 24 and I'm starting to feel like I'm 5. I hate it.

    Is that a side effect I should be concerned about? Or I just need to accept?

    Christine

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Way too sunny Sacramento, CA area
    Posts
    56
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I don't know much since I'm new to this all, but it sounds like the rashes and sores could be from the sun. Just stay out of the sun as much as possible.

    I too am a butterfingers lately. I drop things all the time. I just can't get a good grip on things because of the arthritis pain in my hands.

    Welcome to the board.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,692
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi DioBelloAmore

    With out seeing the rash it would be hard to say. There are many things it could be; even a reaction to the type of sunscreen you are using.

    Some of them make me break out. You should take a picture of the rash if you can, just incase it's gone before you see your doctor.

    I would suggest that you talk to your doctor about the dropping of items. There are many reasons why this could be happening.

    Write down as much as you can about what's happened leading up do and during the dropping. Was there any tingling, pain, or numbness. Write down anything that seemed odd at the time.

    Let us know how you make out
    Oh look ... a cookie

  4. #4
    Saysusie's Avatar
    Saysusie is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the Universe
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Victorville, California
    Posts
    7,781
    Blog Entries
    10
    Thanks
    1,636
    Thanked 943 Times in 597 Posts

    Default

    Hi DioBelloAmore:
    Lupus patients are very sensitive to UV rays. Sometimes, even a little exposure to the sun (UV rays) can trigger a flare of itching, rashy skin, aching muscles, low grade fever, and/or extreme fatigue. In lupus, the body´s immune system goes awry and instead of protecting against foreign invaders, it mistakenly attacks its own skin, joints, kidneys, brain, heart, lungs and blood. Abnormal light sensitivity also known as "photosensitivity" is a major feature of the different forms of lupus including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (which is mainly limited to the skin). Photosensitivity is defined as a skin rash that develops as a result of an unusual reaction to sunlight. UV light causes skin cells to express particular proteins including one called "Ro." These proteins may then be the targets of antibodies, which are thought to attract white blood cells, which attack the skin cells, leading to the inflammation that causes the rash. When people with lupus are exposed to UV rays, they can, and often do, develop new skin lesions and may even develop flares of internal lupus including joint pain and fatigue.
    There are several ways that the skin can show manifestations of sun sensitivity. The butterfly rash, a faint or prominent red rash over bridge of the nose, is common. People with subacute cutaneous lupus may develop a red pimple-like rash that comes out first. As this rash persists, these spots become bigger and scales may even appear. It can be itchy and usually shows up on the face, chest or arms and commonly comes on after sun exposure. The rash usually worsens with increased sun exposure.
    Another type of skin manifestation starts out as a flat lesion and expands outward. These leasions appeas on the face, chest, arms and back and are very sensitive to the sun and tends to be very itchy. When it resolves, it leaves no permanent scarring.
    Chronic discoid lupus lesions is a form of lupus classically thought to only affect the skin. Unlike its cousins, the slightly elevated, pink or red areas which form crust or flake on the surface, these are characteristically likely to scar.
    In addition, some medications routinely taken by people with lupus increase the effects of the sun. People taking so-called "photosensitizing" medications may need extra protection against sunlight.
    If you must be out in the sun, wear broad-brimmed hats and tightly woven, loose-fitting clothing with long sleeves and long pants. Rit Sun Guard Laundry Treatment UV Protectant can be washed into clothing to add extra UV protection, instantly turning ordinary cloth with an SPF of 4 into SPF 30 material.
    Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF rating of at least 30. The broadest protection against both UV-A and UV-B is in sunscreens that contain avobenzone (Parsol 1789 aka avobenzone) or physical blockers such as titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide (see sunscreen post in Lauri's Lounge).
    Also, as Sits-In-The-Corner suggested, it is important that you talk to your doctor about the rash and when it occurred so that you and he can determine exactly what type of rash it is and what type of treatment and/or protection is needed.
    I wish you the best and keep us posted!

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •