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Thread: NOT SURE OF LUPUS YET

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    Default NOT SURE OF LUPUS YET

    But I looked at the different pictures of the rashes and that was quite interesting. Does anyone know if a person has rosacea can that cause a ANA of 640?

    I've had CFS since 1998 and other things have all been ruled out and that's why my diagnosis is CFS. My ANA always tested positive and it was either 160 or 320 and patterns were either speckled or homogeneous. Now the ANA was just tested and it's 640.

    My white count was always low also and now it's dropped to 2.1 and 3 months ago was 2.3.

    I have the rash all on my face, and neck and chest. When I went to the Rheumy before I had this last bloodwork done, I asked him if the rash looked like a lupus rash or a rosacea. He studied it real good and he said it's pointing to lupus and not rosacea.

    When I look at the rosacea pictures I'm still so confused.

    CindyLou

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    Cindylou;

    The quick answer to your question is "NO". But, let me give you some information to help you understand. There are many symptoms of lupus. One of the most common is a rash on the face, which can be confused with rosacea. In lupus, the facial rash is called a Malar rash. The malar rash is a redness or rash that may appear in a butterfly configuration across the nose and cheeks. It can appear on one or both sides of the face and is usually flat. In rosacea, the rash does not have the butterfly configuration. Your question is a common one, so I'm going to try to distinguish between the two conditions:

    LUPUS MALAR RASH:
    The lupus butterfly rash may be one of the first signs that you may have lupus. This rash is characterized by a butterfly-shaped red rash that extends over the bridge of the nose and the cheeks. The rash may be flat or raised. The malar rash often appears or gets worse after sun exposure (photosensitivity) or stress that causes an increase in the circulation to the skin.
    Sometimes the lupus butterfly rash appears on other parts of the body as well, usually on the trunk, arms or legs. The malar rash normally is itch-free and painless, although it may itch and cause a burning sensation. Sometimes the malar rash accompanies a flare (an active state of lupus). The malar rash may be the first sign of lupus, the sign that lupus is entering an active phase or it may actually cause the disease to attack other tissues in the body.
    The lupus butterfly rash can be as mild as a slight blush-like rash to a severe, scaly rash. The butterfly rash may also be short lived, or it may last for many months. The reason the malar rash is shaped like a butterfly is because it follows the angle that the UV rays land on the skin. The malar rash is caused by a malfunctioning immune system, which causes the body to attack healthy tissues in the skin.

    ROSACEA:
    Rosacea is clinically defined as a chronic skin disease that causes redness and swelling, primarily on the face. Rosacea usually varies in severity, and manifests in episodes of flushing and inflammation of the affected areas. The common rosacea symptoms include:
    * Flushing - frequent blushing or flushing is sometimes the first sign of this disease. This facial redness may come and go.
    * Persistent Redness this is the most common rosacea symptom. It is like having a blush or sunburn that will not go away. This may be more noticeable when smiling, frowning, or squinting. Application of cleansers, cosmetics, or moisturizers may increase the irritation. It is this redness that causes the confusion and causes patients to ask is rosacea a symptom of lupus.
    * Bumps and Pimples - Bumps or pimples on the skin, either small and solid (papules) or pus-filled (pustules). This may resemble acne though blackheads are absent. Burning or stinging may occur. This is commonly referred to as acne rosacea.
    * Visible Blood Vessels - Red lines (telangiectasia) in the face caused by enlarged blood vessels.

    As you can see, rosacea and lupus rashes are very different. So Rosacea is not a symptom of lupus. Rosacea and lupus both can cause a red rash on the face, but the rashes are very different. The rosacea rash can be all over the face, while the lupus rash is normally seen in the butterfly pattern. Hope this helps.

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    Saysusie
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    Default Saysusie

    Thank-you for this great explanation. You did a great job of explaining it.

    I understand the rashes now. Since I have CFS, would that cause an ANA of 640, since rosacea doesn't have anything to do with it.

    Now with Rosacea you can get the photosensitivity as like in Lupus--correct?

    I don't have any bumps with mine. It's just flat. It also is on my neck and chest.

    CindyLou

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    That's correct CindyLou

    Sun seems to aggrivate Rosacea and the creams I used to control it make my skin even more light sensative than it was before.
    Oh look ... a cookie

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    Default rashes

    Thanks for replying about rosacea.

    Do you know anything about CFS and positive ANA?

    CindyLou

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    Hi Cindylou;
    It is not unusual to have Positive ANA with CFS. However, it is more common to find that those of us, with Lupus, have Fibromyalgia (rather than CFS) as a co-existing disease and it is common to have positive ANA with Fibromyalgia. The symptoms of Fibromyalgia are very close to those of CFS and Lupus.
    Did your doctor say that you had CFS or AIFS? AIFS is Auto-immune fatigue syndrome. Often, when a patient presents symptoms of CFS with positive ANA, doctors are more prone to test for and diagnose Lupus and/or Fibromyalgia. Speak with you doctor about the possibility of FMS and keep us posted!

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    Default Hi Saysusie

    I do have fibro and back several years ago I only had 11 tender points which isn't as much as what a fibro person would have. My doctor diagnosed me with CFS. He is a CFS specialist and researcher and was on the CFS board of directors.

    But since 1998, why would now my ANA go up to 640 and was always 160 and 320 all them years. That's what I don't understand.

    Do you know why?

    CindyLou

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    ANA tests can vary in the titer and often times, low titer ANA blood tests often turn negative. How to interpret fluctuating ANA tests is often difficult and depends a great deal on your symptoms. A fluctuating ANA, along with low sed rates and negative Anti-DNA antibodies would be more in line with CFS. However, the presence of elevated sedimentation rates and fluctuating ANA, ACE, and LE titers would be more in line with Fibromyalgia. It is not an easy task to understand why ANA fluctuates, but doing so is not uncommon for both illnesses :cry:

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    Default Saysusie

    Thanks for your reply back.

    I did e-mail my CFS specialist over the weekend and asked him if ANA of 640 and dropped white count of 2.1 were normal in CFS. He said they are not normal but he sees them frequently in CFS patients.

    So at first it made me nervous when I read it wasn't normal but then glad he sees it frequently.

    So at least I can stay with my diagnosis of CFS and not Lupus. I wasn't sure with the way my labs were what it meant so until I see definitely can stick with CFS. When I see my labs show definite Lupus then I can say I have Lupus, otherwise it's CFS for me. I'm really happy about that because it gets so confusing. My rheumy thinks I have lupus but I'm not listening to him unless other stuff show up.

    CindyLou

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    Hopefully your CFS will get under control and become manageable and you will not have to have a diagnosis of Lupus. In any event, the treatments and symptoms are similar, so I hope you start to feel better very soon :lol:

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    Saysusie
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