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Thread: Psoriasis vs. Lupus rash?

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    Default Psoriasis vs. Lupus rash?

    Can you help me understand how to tell the difference between psoriasis vs. a lupus related rash?

    I used to have it on my scalp. Used to have it on my wrists. For a while now I've had it in my ear canals. This week I have it starting where my ear lobes connect to my jawline. Basically, its red, then scaly, a little "wet."

    The other thing I have going on is small red pimples that crust and shed near my mouth and chin. I went to the doctor for it one time (before suspecting lupus) and she told me it was not acne. She thought it was some rash I'd never heard of but now I forget what...she seemed perplexed by it.

    Ugh, it all sounds so gross to type it out!!!! These things come and go though I usually have some somewhere. But this week my joints have been more achey and the rashes have increased.

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    Hi Chonea;

    rashes are funny messy things. I was sure a couple years ago that I had a severe lupus rash on my face. My primary doc looked at it and said "Hmmm...I don't know" My Rheumy looked at it and said "Hmmm...I dont think it is lupus, I think it is rosacea." So my primary sent me to a deratologist....Yep, rosacea. About 6-9 months of lots of creams in specific rotations and it was under control.

    You might want to see if you can get to a dermatologist - it may help you get rid of the rash more quickly!

    good luck -

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    There are several ways that Lupus can cause skin rashes: The one that most sounds like yours is known as Subacute Cutaneous Lupus. The subacute cutaneous lupus lesion can sometimes mimic the lesions of psoriasis or they can appear as non-scarring, coin-shaped lesions much like hives. This lesions are described as a non-scarring, erythematosus (or red), coin-shaped lesion which are very photosensitive (meaning, they get worse when exposed to UV light). This type of lesion occurs in lupus patients who, approximately half of the time, also have symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus.
    These skin lesions also occur in people who only have discoid lupus, and who do not show any symptoms of systemic lupus. Approximately 70% of people with these lesions have anti-Ro antibodies.
    These lesions can occur on the face in a butterfly distribution, or can cover large areas of the body. Unlike the discoid lupus lesions, these lesions do not produce permanent scarring, but can be very significant cosmetically.
    Coexistence of psoriasis and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is unusual. Although there have been reports of this occurring. Psoriasis generally precedes the diagnosis of SLE. Psoriasis can also be associated with discoid lupus erythematosus. In some cases, SLE appeared as a complication of the ultraviolet phototherapy used in the treatment for the psoriasis. hydroxychloroquine (a standard treatment in SLE) may exacerbate the psoriasis. The use of corticosteroids raises the risk of severe psoriasis relapse during withdrawal from the drug (a common practice in Lupus). In those rare occassions when there is a psoriasis/SLE association, it is suggested that methotrexate might be the best treatment.

    However, different rashes and skin conditions usually can be distinguished by their location, color, and appearance. Red, dry skin is commonly caused by infections, rosacea, or irritants. Seborrheic dermatitis (a disease that causes flaking of the skin. It usually affects the scalp) can cause dandruff and crusty yellowed patches of skin that may be confused with psoriasis. Reiters disease and Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus) may cause skin conditions and arthritis in a way similar to psoriasis. Various conditions and fungal infections also can give nails the appearance of psoriasis.

    I hope that I've been helpful..let me know if you need anything further
    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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