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Thread: Eustachian Tube Dysfunction: Can it Cause Vertigo?

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    Default Eustachian Tube Dysfunction: Can it Cause Vertigo?

    Hi!

    I have spent most of yesterday (Friday) completely bed-ridden with terrible Vertigo. I was not able to attend school (I am almost seventeen years old).

    The only ear problem which I have is a Eustachian Tube Dysfunction in both ears. Does anyone know if a Eustachian Tube Dysfunction can cause Vertigo?

    Symptoms which I usually get from the E.T. Dysfunction are: Tinnitus, slight hearing loss in the left ear and terrible pain in both ears. I also have Myoclonus of the Eustachian Tube muscles (also called Palatal Myoclonus).

    Thanks and keep well!

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    Hi ILoveHistory :lol:

    Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) usually causes a feeling of ear pressure. This is the same sensation you may have while driving into the mountains or descending in an airplane. It's the "I need to pop my ears!" feeling. There is a pressure difference between the outside world and the middle ear space (the space behind the eardrum).
    The eustachian tube (ET) is a muscular tube that connects the middle ear to the throat. Most of the time, the ET is collapsed; when it opens (when you "pop your ears") air can flow through the tube into the middle ear space. This causes the air pressure in the middle ear space to become equal to the air pressure in the room. When the ET fails to open, however, a pressure difference can build, and a varied array of symptoms may arise. Ear pain, hearing loss, ringing (tinnitus) and dizziness (unsteadiness, and yes, even true vertigo) are not uncommon. Since some folks do not localize pain well, ETD can sometimes be reported as a fairly nonspecific headache or facial pain. It is also not uncommon to develop myoclonus of the eustachian tube muscles; this is known as palatal myoclonus, due to the fact that these muscles arise from the palate (roof of the mouth). One can also develop myoclonus of the eustachian tube muscles; this is known as palatal myoclonus, due to the fact that these muscles arise from the palate (roof of the mouth). Patients with palatal myoclonus may feel a twitch in their mouth or throat as well as a repetitive sound in their ears.
    Chronic eustachian tube dysfunction is frequently encountered by primary care physicians and otolaryngologists. This condition can be difficult to treat, particularly in adults who have a lifelong history of eustachian tube dysfunction. Bluestone and Doyle conducted a study and attributed three major functions to the eustachian tube: ventilation, clearance, and protection of the middle ear. (1) The middle ear tends to lose gas by diffusion into the surrounding mucosal circulation. The normal eustachian tube serves to admit gas in order to equalize middle ear pressure with that of the surrounding environment. Eustachian tube dysfunction can result in negative middle ear pressure and precipitate associated signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms include conductive hearing loss, tinnitus, otalgia, VERTIGO, tympanic membrane atelectasis, cholesteatoma formation, and recurrent otitis media. Many authors have concluded that eustachian tube dysfunction is the most important precipitating pathology in the development of otitis m edia.

    I hope that I've answered your question. Let me know if you need anything further :lol:

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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    Wow....I'm glad Saysusie answered so completely!

    I had vertigo once - related to an inner ear infection, so it doesn't surprise me that eustatian tube problems could cause vertigo as well.. It was miserable - I feel for you! I was on antivert (the generic version - which I think you can get over the counter now) for a couple months. I was so afraid of the vertigo returning that I was afraid to stop taking it.

    I hope you're feeling better now!

    Gentle hugs ~

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    Hi!

    Saysusie: Thank you SO much! Yes, I permanently live with the "I can't pop my ears!" feeling! :x

    Hatlady: Thank you very much for your response and kind words! Yes, I am feeling better, thank you!

    Keep well and God bless!

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    You are most welcome! I hope you are able to get some relief

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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