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Thread: Effectiveness of the M.M.R. Vaccine against Measles

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    Default Effectiveness of the M.M.R. Vaccine against Measles

    Hi!

    I was just wondering if anybody knows how effective the M.M.R. Vaccine is against Measles? I had the vaccine when I was small and was vaccinated again for Rubella when I turned twelve years old. I have been tested for Rubella immunity and am 100% immune to the virus. Yay!

    As far as I am aware, the Mumps part of the vaccine is 95% effective and I have never had Mumps, so I'm sure that it's working for me! :lol:

    It's just that Rubella, Chickenpox, etc. are circulating around my high school (I am sixteen years old) and I need to know how protected I am against Measles, i.e. so that I know what sort of precautions to take. I have never had Measles.

    Thanks and keep well!

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    If you got your measles booster when you started kindergarten or first grade, you should be okay. The measles vaccine gives about 99% immunity. If you just got the MMR as a baby and didn't get the booster when you started school, then you might need to get one now.

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    Hi Marycain!

    Thanks very much!

    From what I can see on one of my Immunisation Certificates, I was vaccinated against Measles when I was ten months old and then again when I was six years old. I take it that I am safe then! Yay! :lol: I know that I have DEFINITELY had the M.M.R. Vaccine as well, but I'm not sure when? It's on a different Immunisation Certificate. I was also vaccinated against Rubella at twelve years old because I can remember that.

    Do you know what B.C.G. stands for on an Immunisation Certificate, by any chance? I think that it might be Tuberculosis, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks and keep well!

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    B.C.G. is Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) Vaccine - it is given against tuberculosis. It is not used in the United States, so I have no personal experience with it.

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    Hi Marycain!

    Thanks very much!

    Do you mind me asking what type of vaccine is used in the U.S.A. then? Is it right to only have the Tuberculosis vaccine once? It gives three blocks on my Immunisation Certificate (1st, 2nd and Pre-School) and only one has been filled in - it was given two days after I was born. Surely that would have worn off by now?! :shock:

    Thanks and keep well!

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    We don't use any type of vaccination for TB, until recently, it was pretty much eradicated in the US. But if you only had the BCG vaccine once, it's unlikely you are still protected - it is only effective for a limited number of years and requires repeat innoculations to maintain immunity. Even with repeat vaccinations, the vaccine only offers about 60% immunity, so it is not a guarantee against contracting TB.

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    Hi Marycain!

    Thanks very much!

    The thing that concerns me is that Tuberculosis is EXTREMELY, EXTREMELY common here in South Africa and of course, highly contagious. We are having problems here in South Africa with XDR-TB (Extremely Drug Resistant Tuberculosis) and many people are dying from it. The W.H.O. is trying to help because the situation has actually got out of hand.

    I heard that in the U.S.A., girls who are entering puberty are vaccinated against H.P.V. Is this common over there? It doesn't seem to be done here at all. :? I think that part of the problem is that it is a VERY expensive vaccine.

    Thanks and keep well!

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    Sorry to butt in here girls, but I have been reading and I just wanted to say...WOW Marycain, you really know your stuff! You seem so informed about so much on here. I don't mean this sarcastic in any way but...are you a doctor? Seriously. If you're not, then I'm way impressed.

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    To use a French phrase, Camyskitties, d'accord (agreed) - sorry, I'm half-French and speak in Franglais (mixed French and English) all the time! :lol: You can always depend on Marycain for advice, information and support! She is truly a gift from God!

    Keep well!

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    About the HPV Vaccination - Actually, there is still quite a bit of controversy concerning this new vaccine. The HPV vaccine protects women against cancer-causing strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV) and it is at the center of controversy at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Although it is generally accepted that the vaccine is effective against the most dangerous strains of HPV, which are responsible for about 70 percent of all cases of cervical cancer, vaccine opponents claim that making it a regular part of childrens' vaccine protocol would encourage young women to be more sexually active. Women's health advocates are urging that it become part of the regimen of pre-puberty vaccines, since HPV is spread primarily through sexual contact.
    As of 2006, HPV vaccines have been tested on 25,000 people in 33 countries. The duration of immunity following a complete schedule of immunization with vaccine has not been completely established. The American College of Pediatricians recommends that HPV vaccine manufacturers establish vaccine registries for HPV vaccine recipients. The registries are to be designed to assure patient privacy and to collect long term data.
    Because the average time between initial HPV infection and death from cervical cancer is 20 years, definitive conclusions about HPV vaccine efficacy will take years to establish. Until further research is completed, HPV vaccine recipients are to be fully informed as to the current limits of knowledge regarding the vaccine’s potency and duration of protection. It may be years before we know, with certainty, the duration of protection afforded by HPV vaccines. However, putting off the administration of the vaccine until the child is sexually active, and therefore at risk of HPV exposure, is the question that parents should consider. Also, Parents and adolescents must consider the fact that 30% of cervical cancers are not caused by the HPV strains included in the current HPV vaccines and they should also understand that this vaccine offers no protection against other forms of sexually transmitted diseases!
    It is a formidable controversy that I'm not sure has had a solution yet. The vaccine, I believe, is available on a volunteer basis. I could be wrong, but I don't remember hearing anything that stated that it was mandatory yet!!

    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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