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Thread: frozen assets

  1. #1
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    Default frozen assets

    So did that stupid groundhog see its shadow or what? I am so tired of this cold weather, I could just .....freeze. I knew it was coming last fall when the horses put on winter coats that would keep a polar bear warm, but enough already! I came inside from doing my barn chores an hour ago, and my buns are still cold enough to chill beer :roll: . I am ready for all the flowers to start popping up. Thinking warm thoughts, thinking warm thoughts, thinking warm thoughts. Maybe I had better go make one of the warm soup recipies from ya'll. Stay warm everyone.
    Laura

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    No. he didn't see his shadow, which is supposed to mean early spring. Don't you wish people could grow their own coats like horses? Our barn is well-insulated and cozy, so the animals are nice and warm, we just freeze getting back and forth to feed and water them. Hot soup sounds great, but a hot buttered rum sounds even better! LOL

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    Default keeping warm

    We have beaver tails. They are a cdn treat. Basically flattened deep fried dough with cinnamon, brown sugar and lemon juice. (But the dough is whole wheat!) Delicious.....they serve them on the rideau canal which is the world's longest skating rink. It goes on for miles and miles with ice sculptures at winterlude as you skate along. Its pretty neat but cold.....
    keep warm everyone
    Karen

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    Sounds gorgeous - I used to love ice skating - miss it a lot although I was never good at it, and always ended up with at least one badly sprained ankle per winter. The "beaver tails" sound like fun - I would love the recipe - we have TONS of beavers in this area - my BIL works part-time for the state fish & wildlife agency and is constantly having to relocate the critters when one of their dams starts flooding something important - I would love to serve "beaver tails" sometime just to see his reaction.

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    In Canada, pieces of fried dough are sometimes called "Beavertails." A writer of books on Canadian word origins the name referred to quick-baked dough "especially in early 19th-century places where people might camp for one night and where there was no frying pan."[1] Some sources identify "beavertails" as an Ottawa local specialty[2]. BeaverTails is the name (and Canadian trademark) of a chain of restaurants specializing in the item, founded in Ottawa in 1978.[3]

    Preparation
    It is made by deep-fat-frying a portion of risen yeast dough. It is often served sprinkled with powdered sugar and cinnamon or topped with fruit sauce. Sometimes it is also topped with chocolate sauce or whipped cream. The dough acquires an irregular, bubbly appearance from being fried.

    Hi Marycain - if I find an actual recipe I will post but since it is a franchise - they probably don't publicize it. Maybe you will just have to make a trip to sunny old Ottawa some time to try!!
    PS I don't skate anymore either, its tough on the body especially the aching type!! Oh well.

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    Is there a time between the cold weather and the mosquitos in the summer when it's good to visit? I've only been to Ottawa a couple of times on business, so I've not seen much of the city, but I swear those mosquitos were big enough to carry off a small animal. I've also wanted to see more of Canada, but never seem to have the time or the energy. My dream wuld be to travel across Canada by train, stopping at all the beautiful gardens in every city. We took a short train trip (a dinner train) from a town across the river from Ottawa, but I don't remember the name of the town.
    I love train travel, so I always check out any new town to see if there is a scenic train trip anywhere nearby.

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    The Chippewa tribes in Minnesota make a very similar treat just called Indian Fry Bread. We see it at fairs, local folk festivals, etc. It's really popular here. Sounds exactly like your Beaver Tails. Yummy!
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

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    Back west (Montana) we called it indian fry bread too. The topping options I have seen are powdered sugar, cinamon sugar, or whipped honey butter. Here (Illinois) the term seems to be elephant ears. They are basically the same thing - Yummy! I don't think I have ever had them made with wheat dough though. I would love to try that version.

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    I make fry bread sometimes - my Mom was native american - she used to fix it and I use her recipe. but "fry bread" as I know it isn't a yeast dough - it's leavened with baking powder and fried in hot oil or shortening, so it's more like a flat bread than anything else. Different tribes have different styles - so Creek or Osage would be different from Navajo, but mostly the difference is whether the recipe uses powdered milk or real milk. I have seen a couple of recipes that called for yeast or cornmeal but I've never made them. We sometimes top fry bread with maple syrup if we want something sweet, but usually I use it for Navajo tacos, or to eat with posole or wojape (berry pudding). I've never made it with whole wheat flour - just unbleached stone ground - but will definitely give it a try.

    Kelly, where does the lemon juice come into the recipe? Is it part of the dough, or added to the toppings to cut the sweetness? I would love to experiment to create the Canadian version. I've never had elephant ears so I can't really compare, but they sound yummy too.

    One thing you might want to consider if you are watching your weight or cholesterol - many public health authorities blame frybread in part for the virtual epidemic of obesity and diabetes among some Indian tribes, especially Pima and Navajo. A typical serving of frybread has 700 calories and 27 grams of fat, and that doesn't include any toppings. Hate to take the fun out of it, but it's a big part of the reason I don't make it very often - I can't afford the calorie count even though I love the taste. And there's just no way to make a low-fat version that tastes right - at least nothing I've tried. But I would appreciate any suggestions - my kids love fry bread but they don't get it often. And they don't like most posole but if we have it, they have to eat it to get the fry bread, otherwise they would just pig out on it.

    Jody, are there many Anishinabeg (what you call Chippewa - Kelly probably knows them as Ojibway in Canada) in your area? I've always been interested in their culture, especially some of the shamanism like the Shaking Tent ceremonies.

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    Elephant ears are common in the northwest at fairs and festivals as a nice, fatty, yummy, cinnamony treat!
    Missy

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