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Thread: Has anyone ever tried meditation for relief?

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    Default Has anyone ever tried meditation for relief?

    I pray and I suppose that's meditation of sorts...but I have a friend who's undergoing chemo and she is very into meditation when the side effects are bad.
    Feedback, anyone? I know NOTHING about meditation, but might be interested in giving it a try if it works....thanks. Love, Kathy

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    It works for me - I use it for stress relief, and to get to sleep at night. I also use it when I'm in pain. It was also very helpful for me when I had to have some painful dental work done - I'm the original cowardly lion when it comes to the dentist. Does your friend do just meditation, or is she doing visualizations/guided imagery too? A lot of cancer centers use visualizations. I usually combine my meditation with aromatheraoy and that seems to help too.

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    Hi Littlered,

    I discovered it when I began taking yoga, it takes time (because our society is so geared towards....move, faster, etc.)...it takes time to slow your physical momentum into a place where breathing becomes your momentum, and visualizing becomes your feet.....I love it, it's natures stop light (if you will) to help us guage our thoughts, perceptions, feelings, etc.

    Try it my friend, it's a brand new year and nothing but life awaits your discovery. Hope you are feeling well.

    Much love,\
    Browneyedgirl

    p.s. it's so flippin cold, I'm IN my house wearing gloves to type...now how crazy cold is that? ha ha (with frozen breath....and about now is when I meditate about those incredibly warm breezes and soft sand beaches, hooray !!! Giggle
    "I believe that friends are quiet angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly." - unknown

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    My friend doesn't do visualizations...she does things like" first, count 20 deep beaths" and so on. I am not sure what kind of meditation she does. She says if she ever writes a book, It'll be "Meditation for People who don't think they can meditate." She says she'll start it off by saying, "If you are too busy to meditate, consider this: You are not that d-mned important that you can't sare 20 minutes!" and so on. She has told me it helps her "escape" painful stimulus. I am intrigued. I may do some research on it...

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    I find music helps me meditate - I have several meditation cds and a sound therapy machine - combining that with aromatherapy helps me concentrate and block out distractions.

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    Meditiation, visualizations, breathing and focus exercises.......they all have different meanings to everyone, but I've found them helpful.

    You can look up Yoga Nidra (put your body to sleep, but mind awake - sort of meditative state) or pranayama (breathing focused exercises) to get started. Different paths have different forms of meditation. I think the key is to find what works for you.

    I'm fortunate to get to do almost a 1/2 hour of guided yoga nidra every week at the end of my yoga class. In fact, I spent 1 1/2 hours on New Year's day doing a guided yoga nidra workshop. It was a great way to start the new year and for me it is more meditative than traditional yoga meditation (which is clearing the mind - not focusing on the breath or a mantra).

    Good luck!
    Missy

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    Try "Full Catastrophe Living" by John Kabat-Zinn. This deals with mindfullness meditation for people with chronic disease and pain. My rheumy suggested and its been very helpfull. He has a whole program that you go through step by step.

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    I learned guided imagery/visualization techniques when I was injured in car accident and was referred to the local pain clinic. I haven't used it in years, but I remember how helpful it was then. My husband meditates to relieve the stress of his job - he's been telling me to 'get on board' with it for a long time. Reading these posts, it sounds like it could be helpful.
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

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    Well, I have read a little on meditation and have tried it in different scenarios: going to sleep, trying to calm nausea, and for pain reief. It works well for going to sleep. Not very much help for the nausea or the pain relief, though. My mind is just too active during those times. I do find that soothing music helps a TON~!

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    Do you have an aromatherapy diffuser? You can find inexpensive ones at many health food stores - combining aroma and music can be very effective - the scents of peppermint, spearmint, ginger or rosewood can all be very effective in calming nausea. If you don't have a diffuser, soak a cotton ball in peppermint or spearmint extract and wrap in a hankie to make your own "smelling salts". peppermint, spearmint and catnip teas are all very tummy soothing - I like celestial seasonings "grandma's tummy mint". A combination of deep breathing and humming can sometimes stop to urge to yurp. And sometimes when I'm feeling really icky - instead of soothing music, I put on something upbeat I can sing to, or put on the funniest movie I can find. Laughter has an amazing healing quality.

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