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Thread: Yummy recipe for baked potato soup...not Lupus related

  1. #21
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    Jody, I know there are a lot of Scandinavian folks in Minnesota - do you ever make aebleskiver? It's one of Michael's favorite comfort foods, and I've got a couple of different recipes. Like littlered, I've got tons of recipes and would be glad to share - are there any particular kinds of foods you don't like? We have a lot of Amish and Mennonite in the area, so I have quite a few german recipes acquired from them - many southern recipes, and whole books of nothing but bread recipes,

  2. #22
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    I've never heard of aebleskiver...what is it? My husband's father was Norwegian, so Mark grew up eating a lot of traditional Norwegian foods. His favorite, hands down, is lefse. For a guy who doesn't like to eat potatos, he can sure pound down the lefse! I have a friend who makes it for us, but next year during the holidays I'm going to get my own 'equipment' and make it myself. I DO know how...it's just so much work, and I don't have the right griddle...or those special paddles...whine, whine, whine.

    My son's new girlfriend is German; my sister is law is a Georgia girl - so both German and southern cooking would be great. Of course, I'd eat bread all day long!!

    I eat most things. A few things I'm not crazy about are hard cooked eggs, oysters or clams, feta cheese and cilantro. Otherwise, I'll try most things. (I will admit, there were some things in Egypt I was a little afraid of!)
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

  3. #23
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    I hear you - the sheeps' eyeballs almost got me in Egypt - and of course it's impolite in most arabic cultures to refuse food. I got around the problem by explaining I had a religious taboo against eating animal meat - that works pretty well in most places!

    Aebleskiver are Danish pancake balls, but I've had them in other scandinavian countries too. In the Netherlands, I think they are called Poffertjes, and something else in Norway. They are also popular in Germany but I don't know the German term - i think it's munker or something similar. You can buy a special aebleskiver pan (also called a monk's pan) in many speciality cooking stores - including Williams-Sonoma - mine is a heavy cast iron pan with round holes, from Lodge Manufacturing in Tennessee, but you can also use custard cups or those silicone baking cups placed in a heavy pan on the stove, or a round drop biscuit skillet if you have one. If there are a lot of scandinavian stores, you can probably find a pan easily - they aren't very expensive, and you can also use the pan for other dishes.

    Aebleskiver are delicious and you can vary them from sweet to savoury, or add fillings or toppings, so they are versatile too - I make mine from scratch but you can also buy mixes as well as pans -just do an online search for aebleskiver and you will find tons of info - and think how impressed your scandinavian friends will be.

    Danish Aebleskiver Recipe
    Makes about 2 dozen

    2 eggs
    1 tablespoon sugar
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 cup flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1 cup buttermilk
    4 tablespoons butter
    Confectioner's sugar )optional)
    Optional: apple slices or other fruit

    Beat egg yolks until light and fluffy, then add the sugar and salt. Sift the flour with baking powder and baking soda, then add it to the egg mixture, alternating small amounts with the addition of the buttermilk, as you continue mixing. Beat the egg whites until stiff, then gently fold them into the batter.

    Heat the Aebleskiver pan. Place approximately 1/2 teaspoon of butter in each cup and heat until foamy.

    Drop batter into cups, filling each about 2/3 full.
    If you wish to use apple slices or other fruit, drop a slice in the center of each cavity. You can also fill the inside by pouring some batter in the mould, adding a teaspoon of your filling, and covering with another layer of batter.

    Cook over medium heat until browned and crisp on bottom. Turn each cake with a fork to cook the other side.

    The Aebleskiver is done when a toothpick, or cake tester, inserted in the center comes out clean.

    Remove cakes from pan and sprinkle with confectioner's sugar, if desired. Best when served warm. They also freeze well, and can be reheated.

    Sweet fillings could be jam or fruit preserves, savoury fillings could be herbed butter, grated cheese, crumbled cooked bacon, etc. Williams-Sonoma has a nice recipe that uses wild blueberries. If you wanted to be truly scandinavian you could use lingonberry jam. These are great for brunch, and also are nice to serve at parties.

    Enjoy!

  4. #24
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    Oh, I've had those! Just didn't know what they were called. Delicious..another recipe for my 'file!'
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

  5. #25
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    OK, my recipe to share for today: Peach Cobbler (easy,easy!)

    1/2 cup sugar plus 2 tbsp large crystal sugar
    1/2 cup flour
    1/8th tsp salt
    1 tbsp baking powder
    1 tsp ginger
    3/4 cup heavy cream (sub half and half or milk if you must...but the heavy cream is sooooo good in this!)
    6 tbsp melted butter
    1 large can sliced peaches, with juice.

    Make batter by mixing flour, sugar, ginger, baking powder and salt. Add heavy cream a little at a time, til blended. Melt 4 tbsp butter in square baking pan. Pour half the batter in, then carefully place peaches and spoon the juice over the top. Then ladle the other half of the batter on top of the peaches. Cut up remaining 2 tbsp butter and dot the top. Sprinkle large sugar crystals over the top if you have them. (If not, use about 2 tbsp of regular sugar.)
    Cook in 325 degree oven for 45 minutes.

  6. #26
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    Can't wait to try the cabbage rolls! Thanks!

    I'm definitely a Rachel Ray and Paula Dean mixed, too!

    I don't think I could possibly live without feta (I have a great sundried tomato/feta dip!) and cilantro (it makes every salsa salsier!).

    I love Poffertjes! We have a lot of people of Scandinavian descent in a small town to the North of us, and every year at the county fair, there is a booth for Poffertjes. They are great!
    Missy

  7. #27
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    I love sun-dried tomatoes...I like to grab a handful and chew them. Hubby hates them, though, so I don't use them much in cooking

  8. #28
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    Default Recipe of the day -

    Instead of food, how about a beverage instead? Jody, you said your sister in law was a Georgia girl, so I'm sure she's probably taught you how to make sweet tea. But for those who don't have a southerner in the family, here's how to make real Southern sweet tea, perfect with any Southern meal,


    3 family size tea bags ( I like Luzianne Tea Bags )
    2 cups of cold water
    1 cup of sugar
    pinch of baking soda

    Place tea bags in cold water and bring to a boil... As soon as water starts to boil, remove from the heat (at this point add a pinch of soda to the tea. This makes it darker and removes any bitterness) Place tight fitting lid on pot and steep tea for about 10 to 15 minutes. Meanwhile, in a gallon container, place the sugar and enough hot water to dissolve the sugar, making a sugar syrup. After tea has steeped, remove tea bags from pot, and pour tea into the sugar water. Stir well so that sugar water is completely mixed in. Add enough cold water to make 1 gallon. Store in refrigerator. Serve over ice in tall glasses or pretty mason jars, with a wedge of lemon on the side.

  9. #29
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    Ahhhh, yes...sweet tea is the house wine of the South! :lol:

  10. #30
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    Two more winners - peach cobbler and sweet tea! Thanks! I've got to dig up some of my recipes to share. I DO love to cook.

    It'll be fun to surprise my sister in law with sweet tea next time they come north! Thanks, Marycain.
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

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