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Thread: Does Lupus run in families?

  1. #11
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    Oh - yeah - I didn't mean to make it sound like I think it's all genetic at all. I totally think you have to have a predisposition and then some sort of trigger in life. And that's what they said at that symposium, too. I guess I didn't state that very well.

    I just think my family is predisposed. I have two full biological siblings and my brother has Type 1 diabetes since age 6, my sister had Lupus (1st diagnosed as RA), and I have Lupus. Our 1/2 sister is only 11, so I hold out hope that statistically she will not have to deal with it. Also, my aunt has Graves disease and an uncle has RA (on opposite sides of the family, no less). And then there is the non-auto-immune stuff..........but all the grandparents have lived long lives!

    My best friend always says "who knew your families were such a combination?"

    I always tell my doctors that we are good people with bad genes, and I still think that's better than being bad people with good genes!!!!
    Missy

  2. #12
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    Yes, we've got a lot of the "bad genes" in our family too - also maybe some "bad people", if family stories are true a distant ancestor was hanged as a horse thief in wild west days! Hope that doesn't run in families (LOL).

  3. #13
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    My doctor said its not at all hereditary
    That's a relief for I don't my lupus to be passed on to my children someday
    There is nothing we can do to make God love us more and there's absolutely nothing we've done to make Him love us less... God loves us without conditions for just the way we are!

    Pieces of Me!

  4. #14
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    Default Lupus runs in my family

    My Great-GrandMother died in her 30's from what we think was lupus/sjogrens. My GrandMother died at 56 from sjogrens/lupus. My Mother has tested positive but has not really had any problems. I am 42 and have been diagnosed since I was 24. I was not really sick at all until 5 years ago and I am just getting worse.Lupus, sjogrens,fibromayalgia,connective tissue, SVT of the heart, RA,etc... My children have not tested positive yet but I hear that there are many false/positive results. Not that I want to pass this along to my kids. My boys are 21 and 18 they are very weak and skinny for their ages. My daughter so far is very healthy. I worry everyday that I might have passed the gene to them.
    Kathleen Gardo

  5. #15
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    Default Who knows...so many different answers

    Some say it runs in the family, some say no...I know several people that have it and it just happens that others in the family have it. I have it, and nobody in my current family has it, but my grand aunt -my Mom's first cousin...has it, and I believe my grand mother had it, but never diagnosed and i think the same thing might be with my mother.

    My Mom's PCP/GP won't test her because she's over 70 but has had a sting of bad health...so I'll be looking to see if she can change doctors in her HMO and also file a grievance. Not thrilled that I have to go this route. When I was diagnosed, my sister told her GP/PCP and they tested her immediately without question and the same for my 8 year old daughter no questions asked, they just did it.

    I know the testing is not cheap but sometimes it's really nice to just know the answers without fighting to be tested.

  6. #16
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    My maternal grandmother died very young (in her early 40's.) She had rosy cheeks and early onset arthritis...and she died of renal failure. Back then, they had no way of diagnosing or treating. I strongly suspect she had Lupus.I have had my daughter and my neices all ask to take the ANA blood test, just to be on the safe side...so far, all negative. thank GOD!

  7. #17
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    Default thanks for the encouragement

    For so long i wanted to push for testing, but my Mom's doctor has consistantly made us feel like it's not needed and that it is impossible for her to have it after 70. I have asked in another forum and several people have said for me to keep pushing. These are other lupus people, a rn and my own rheumatologist said it's not an unreasonable request.

    the past year my sister and I have felt so bellittled by my Mom's doctor that we're just tired of her and want to change doctors and get her tested..but I think the HMO should cover the testing...even if they don't, we still would pay out of pocket.

    We're just waiting for grievence papers to fill out and also change doctors. we just want a second opinion.

    thanks and I know there's no cure, I just think that with the proper medications, the symptoms for me have kind of faded away. sure I still get them, but it's not nearly as bad as it was in the past.

    Take care,
    ruby

  8. #18
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    It't rare for people to develop lupus at an older age, but certainly not impossible. But a lot of medicines that older people might take - certain medicines for blood pressure and heart conditions - can actually cause a drug-induced form of lupus. So you might look at any medicines your mom is taking and see if any of them have been linked to drug-induced lupus.

    Unless a person is having symptoms, there is no practical way to routinely test for lupus in a patient's other family members. A lot of people who have a blood relative with lupus will have a weakly positive ANA test, but the majority of people who have a positive ANA don't have lupus, and a positive ANA doesn't mean a increased risk of developing lupus. So if the test is positive, but there are no symptoms or problems that suggest lupus, it might lead to unneccessary testing or even treatment for a medical problem that doesn't actually exist. That's part of the reason why most lupus experts don't recommend routine ANA testing for other family members - the test isn't specific enough in the absence of other symptoms to be worthwhile.

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