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  1. #1
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    Default New to Forum

    Hi! I'm 46 and have had severe health problems for years. I have been diagnosed as SLE. I'm currently on DHEA, provigil, high blood pressure medication, requip, celebrex, darvocet, vitamin b12 shot monthly, monthly hormone shot, alergy shots weekly to keep away chronic sinus infections.
    Currently the only high antibody I'm showing off the charts is Anti-chromatin IGg at 40. (normal is 0-19) No one seems to know what this is and if I should worry. My Rheumy says it is like a marker as ANA is, but I have found nothing to back that up.
    The worst part of my Lupus is constantly being bone dead tired to where I fight not to fall asleep at work, and sick all the time. I'm always getting the chills, then swollen glands and blah....
    It's nice to meet you all.

  2. #2
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    Default Hi, and Welcome

    I'm also in the forty something generation, although I sometimes feel eighty! Know what you mean about the tiredness - my doc has recommended provigil but my insurance won't pay for it.

    Antibodies are one of those confusing issues it's almost impossible to explain in plain English, but let me try. As you probably know, Antibodies are substances produced by the body's immune system in response to bacteria, viruses, or other foreign substances. They are also called immunoglobulins (Ig). Antibodies attach to the foreign substances, causing them to be destroyed by other immune system cells. Usually, antibodies are specific to each type of foreign substance. Sometimes the immune system starts to produce antibodies against a person's own tissues - this is called auto-immunity. Diseases like lupus are characterized by an autoimmune response to the body's own tissues and organs, so they are called autoimmune disorders.

    There are five major types of antibodies - IgA, IgG, IgM, IgD, and IgE. IgG antibodies are found in all body fluids. They are the smallest but most common of the antibodies, making up about 75% to 80% of all the antibodies in the body. IgG antibodies are considered the most important antibodies for fighting bacterial and viral infections. They are also the only type of antibody that can cross the placenta during pregnancy.

    Chromatin is a complex of DNA and protein found inside the nuclei of certain cells. So antibodies to chromatin are sometimes called anti-nucleosome antibodies.

    Anti-chromatin antibodies are considered specific for lupus because, unlike ANA (antinuclear antibodies), they rarely occur in people with no underlying disease. They do occur in some people with scleroderma or other autoimmune disease, but are more likely to occur in lupus. They can also-occur in drug-induced lupus.

    So what IcG antichromatin means is that your body is producing the IcG type of antibody to the chromatin in some of your cells. About 50-70 percent of lupus patients will test positive for these antibodies. There is a correlation between antichromatin antibodies and kidney involvement in lupus, so people with these antibodies need to have their kidney function checked regularly.

    I hope this explains a little. If you are having trouble finding information on the internet, try searching for anti-nucleosome antibodies instead.

  3. #3
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    Default Thank you for response.

    Thank you for your response. It's funny, your contact name is my mother's name...Mary Cain. Cain is my maiden name.

    I really appreciate your acknowledgement, you seem very knowledgable in this area.

    It's been a very frustrating uphill battle. My Rheumy only seems to be monitoring me and treating me symptomatically. Even though he has me diagnosed as SLE. However, he isn't monitoring my kidney's. He also blows off the high reading of this antibody stating it is just like an ANA. Well, I contacted the person in Spain that does research on this antibody (I found his email online) and he assumed I was a doctor. He said it should be treated as if I was showing high Anti-DNA. I just don't know if I should try to find another Rheumy or wait with this one. I feel he is waiting for something major to happen. He hasn't even put me on the normal medication for Lupus! Wierd....Confused....

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    Default

    welcome :lol:
    Diagnosed in 1990 at age 11.
    Trust in the Lord with all of your heart!

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