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Thread: I'm now in a wheelchair

  1. #11
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    One of the best demonstrations of grace in the face of adversity that I ever saw was a woman that I trained with to do diversity workshops. She was blind and used a wonderful guide dog. Sheri had such dignity about her, which would've been enough to inspire respect from those around her. But what was so amazing was her sense of humor. We would be doing a training somewhere and she would randomly point to someone in the group (and I mean randomly!) and say in a challenging tone, "Hey, I saw that!" Everyone would break up. She had a million little lines like that, and it went a long way to making people relax about her disability. And, she was very powerful at teaching about accepting diversity! My point is who you are is a product of all of the experiences and influences in your life -- even the bad, painful or negative ones. I've always though that we're all a kind of tapestry, woven of lots of different kinds of threads. Being sick, using a cane, a wheelchair, a guidedog can be something that holds us back, or we can just look at it as one of the threads in that tapestry. If someone else views as less of a person because of that, we can just smile and walk (or roll!) away - the loss is theirs! Hang in there...I think we're all special.
    "If you trust Google more than you trust your doctor than maybe it's time to switch doctors."

  2. #12
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    Nicole, don't ever let being in a wheelchair stop you from going anywhere you want to go, or being the person you dream of being. You are a whole person, not a collection of parts - just because a couple of parts don't work like everyone else's, it doesn't make you defective, or less of a person. And it doesn't close the door to a loving relationship with a special person - look at Joni Eareckson Tada, who met and married her husband AFTER she broke her neck in a accident and became a quadriplegic. Or my wonderful friend Ron, who lost both his legs in a mining accident, fell in love with one of the nurses at the rehab center, and got married. His wheelchair didn't stop him from being a husband and father - mine doesn't stop me from being a wife, a mom, or anything else I choose to do. But in the end, it has to be your choice, stay at home and feel isolated and alone, or find out what services are available to you, take advantage of them, and go out and face the world with your head held high. The secret to being liked and accepted by other people - you have to like and accept yourself first. If you are comfotable with your wheelchair, other people will be too. After a while, they will notice YOU, not the chair.

  3. #13
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    Hear, Hear, MaryCain....I couldn't have said it better myself!! *applause*

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