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Thread: paralysis

  1. #1
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    Default paralysis

    hi i'm lynne ihave periods of paralysis with my lupus.All testing has been done with no answers.Has anyone had this probem. I am on neuronton and flexoril and that helps a lot. I have been labled with neuopathy for now. Please help! Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Hi, Lynne

    It would help us help you if you explain more specifically what you mean by "paralysis" - are you talking about a total inability to move, or not being able to move an arm or leg - if you could describe the specific symptom and the pattern - does it last for hours or days, is it just when you wake up, etc, then maybe someone might have some information that could help.

  3. #3
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    Default

    I have been unable to move my legs for almost two years now. I might have Lupus, I have every symptom. I havn't been tested for over five years now (my ANA was negative than.). I do have Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy... but that doesn't fit into the kidney symptoms and rashes and stuff.
    I'm going to go and lay down, I'm really tired.

    Oh, and by the way, my name is Bethany. This is my first post on the boards. I'll be fifteen next month, and I'm a freshman. You can read my story on my website: http://missbethanyann.tripod.com. I just labeled it as RSD, even though I probably do have Lupas as well. It would make sense if I have more than one auto-immune disease.

    -Bethany

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    Default

    Hi!

    This may sound like a really stupid question, so please forgive me, but is it possible to be temporarily unable to walk (paralysis in both legs) and yet have your reflexes present?

    Keep well!

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    Default

    Were your electrolytes checked at the time? Acute hypokalemic paralysis (rare complication of low potassium, usually genetic) can cause temporary paralysis with normal deep tendon reflexes. Correcting the potassium imbalance usually fixes the paralysis. There are literally dozens of things that cause paralysis, but most of them will also affect the deep tendon reflexes. Some of these things are reversible or temporary, others like spinal cord injury may be permanent,

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    Default

    Hi!

    Oh, thank goodness, Marycain! Thank you SO much for replying! I have been worrying about this for ages because I was paralysed for three days at the beginning of December and went to see my Neurologist, but my deep tendon reflexes were 100% present and that's when I was so rudely accused of having a psychological problem, well, Munchausen Syndrome, actually! My Psychiatrist very promptly phoned up my Neurologist and pointed out that children CANNOT have Munchausen Syndrome; it can only occur in people over the age of twenty!

    I have been having a lot of problems with Hypokalaemia for a while now and had read that this can cause paralysis, but thought that my deep tendon reflexes would have been non-existent. I have been worrying and worrying about the paralysis episode for ages, as I was wondering what could have caused it and whether I had actually gone mad! :cry:

    I wish that doctors were more careful... It's unbelievable what psychological damage they can actually cause to innocent people! :cry:

    Thank you SO much, Marycain!

    Keep well!

  7. #7
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    Default

    With hypokalemic paralysis, what it affects are the muscles, not the nerves that control reflexes. So the deep reflexes might be slightly depressed, but could be perfectly normal because the nerves are not affected by the paralysis - sensation, temperature, and pain perception are usually normal - the person just can't move their legs. Although it's fairly rare, certain people do have a genetic predisposition to myotonic disorders, and children who have birth-injury conditions such as cerebral or Ebbs palsy may also be more likely to develop this. Unfortunately. most doctors are trained to look for horses. not zebras, so something like hypokalemia might be overlooked as a cause.

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    Hi!

    Thanks SO much again for all of your fantastic information, Marycain! I seriously don't know what I would do without you!

    Keep well!

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