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Thread: Coping with changes in cognitive function

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    Default Coping with changes in cognitive function

    there is an excellent article in the "lupus now" magazine. http://www.lupus.org/webmodules/weba...m_medium=email
    When you're stressed, You eat Ice cream, Cake, Chocolate & Sweets. Why? Because stressed spelled backwards is DESSERTS.

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    Reading that article was like reading my life story. I've dealt with every single one of those issues and I too, have my "bag of tricks". My smartphone and iPad are lifesavers. Everything I never wanted to know about how to get through my day is on my electronics (ironic considering I used to be anti electronic). At work, I write down EVERYTHING: when the boss gives me a file to put in a particular place, I immediately put a sticky note on it stating where it goes just in case I get distracted before I can put the file away. I have several instances of the phone ringing or someone coming to my desk before I've had a chance to put the file away and by the time, no matter how brief I can get to it, I've forgotten where it goes unless I have that sticky note! When I get a call, I immediately write down the person's name otherwise by the end of the conversation I've forgotten who I was speaking with. Going on any trip; day, weekend or longer requires lists. Usually duplicate lists. One in my purse, one on my phone, one on my iPad. Way to often I will look at an object and I know darn well I know what it is, say for example, the garbage can but there's been times I totally blank out what the name of that object is. I tell my husband to look where I'm pointing!! I used to forget my kids' name all the time. It got to the point I'd tell them: "you know who you are, you know what you did so KNOCK IT OFF!" I've called my kids by the dog's name and vice versa. I tell people that I'm great at keeping secrets because in 5 minutes I'll forget what they said. Seriously. I used to be a master of multitasking. Yeah, those days are soooo over. Slow and steady now. It may take longer to get the task done, but going slow gets it done right the FIRST time...or 2...

    Changes in cognitive function: yeah another facet of having an "invisible" disease. Don't worry about it, just wait 5 minutes and we'll forget we have it.
    "I'm going to get healthy or die trying"

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    I am to the point when I meet people and my friends to tell them that don't get offended when I don't remember your name because I won't. I have everything written down too but that still doesn't always work, I have lists every where and written on my phone and I still forget! I get confused when reading instructions or questions on paperwork I am filling out. They are really simple but for some reason it just wont register in my brain so I end up asking people and when I talk about the question i'm like "ooooh never mind I understand now" and then I tell whoever I ask that just talking about the question to someone else usually does the trick for me. To keep myself from getting lost when driving I talk out loud the directions to myself even though I have been there a bunch of times before, my sister still gets so mad at me when I do it. It helps though because I get to my location with out any detours. I love Ruziska's last sentence that made me laugh.

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    Thank you for posting this article. For a while you think your losing your mind. I can't remember some things from one day to the next. I did go out and buy a lot of paper to keep notes for myself. It's embarrassing when your trying to talk to someone and you forget the words your about to say. I find it difficult to start conversations with my husband at times. It's a sad reality of Lupus. Sometimes, I just want to cry. I try to cartel the crying for times of isolation. I don't want my children to see me cry about what is happening to me. My oldest is already worried about the toll it has taken and continues to take. I also find it hard to put sentences together. I was a great writer in school and beyond. Now, I can barely get a few things typed that makes sense. This article definitely shed some light on things for me. My next Rheumatology appointment is in October. I will be mentioning this to them.
    Last edited by Creekbank; 08-25-2013 at 06:04 PM.

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    I am one of the 20-60%. I say he instead of she. I say red when I mean black. I say the verb before the subject. I've been in my SUV, in my driveway and wondered was I coming home or leaving. And isn't like forgetting your keys..I've done that and you can always find them. It is losing a word, and it is not at the tip of your tongue, but you're trying to find the word in your brain file.

    It is like you have to remember your conversation as you talk, always...you try to remember the last word you said while simultaneously saying the next word. Quite a feat without coming across as a ditz.

    People say I am well written but it is because it easier to write more often than it is to convey myself in conversation. I can see what I write not what I am saying. Times I sound like I am ditzy drunk, then sober, then a ditz again. Like a weekly forecast of weather but felt in one day, even during one hour. Clear, cloudy, Clear, rain, Clear, foggy, Clear. It comes unexpected to the listener, but I anticipate it because it is my norm...

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    Oluwa,

    Thank you for sharing that because I feel the same way about feeling ditzy in conversation. That happens to me all the time now. I almost want to tell people before hand, "I am not drunk or anything, it's a Lupus day for me!" I am finding these changes within me to become hard to handle emotionally. I guess I am still trying to get used to my new normal. I try to be positive about the change.

    Creekbank

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oluwa View Post
    ...... People say I am well written but it is because it easier to write more often than it is to convey myself in conversation. I can see what I write not what I am saying. ......
    this is exactly the same for me. I can write something.... because it is thought about before it is written. when I speak ...... it is spoken as soon as I think. so I make mistakes when I speak.
    When you're stressed, You eat Ice cream, Cake, Chocolate & Sweets. Why? Because stressed spelled backwards is DESSERTS.

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    For me personally, the cognitive disfunction aspect of lupus is the hardest to deal with. Not that the rest of the issues are such joy but "of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most" - Mark Twain. Knowing darn well you know that you know how to do something but at that moment you've totally lost how to do it is frustrating beyond words. To look at an ordinary object and not remember the name of it. I've just begun my journey of training my service dog and I'm worried, not that I can actually train him but that I can remember the commands at the moment I need them. When my husband and I have a conversation, thankfully he knows me well enough to be able to figure out what I mean, not what I can't say. For coworkers and anyone else it can be a struggle. Maybe its a good thing Lupus is a short word: we'd have an even harder time remembering what we have it it had a really long name. At least I would.
    "I'm going to get healthy or die trying"

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    Oh my goodness.......YOU are ALL so RIGHT on the mark with THIS one......I feel like a child so often...I even get TREATED like a child or like I am mentally hadicapped when I am out BY ADULTS..I get frustrated sometimes by it....Ive NEVER experienced "THAT" until I got Lupus/Sjogrens/MS etc... My brain in under attack almost all the time!!! BOOOOOOO......
    We Live in a MORTAL, FRAIL, IMPERFECT world in which the word "FAIR" doesn't always apply.Make EVERY MOMENT COUNT with the ones you LOVE because it can end in the blink of an eye. Love, Jeannette

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    Maybe it is easier just to say I have Dysphasia, as everyone who hears that term understands the definition and will give us the patience we so deserve for having an invisible disease...perhaps.

    Follow the yellolw brick road... http://medical-dictionary.thefreedic....com/dysphasia

    Be well...neck hugs....O.

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