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Thread: muscle spasms/twitching

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    Default muscle spasms/twitching

    I have been trying to log in for several months and finally, today it let me!!! Anyway, I was diagnosed with Lupus 3 months ago after going through testing for over a year. One concern I have and my doctor says is not related to the Lupus, is twitching in my legs and arms throughout the day and night. It is almost like a reflex thing. They twitch and jerk at random. They tell me it could be restless legs, but it effects my arms as well.
    Has anyone experienced this? I am beginning to think I am nuts! :?

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    Default Hi Teina

    I am so glad that you were finally able to log on :lol: . I have researched your question regarding muscle spasms and, like your doctor, have been unable to find a direct correlation between the spasms and lupus.
    Many lupus patients suffer from muscle pain, which is quite different from muscle spasms. twitching, cramps or stiffness. However, neuromuscular diseases can cause a variety of other muscle weakness such as described above. Muscle twitching (aka: fasciculation) is caused by abnormal nerve activity and they tend to involve a small portion of the affected muscle. Twitching is common in ALS and spinal bulbar muscular distrophy. Twitching and spasms are made worse by stress, lack of sleep and caffeine. All of these are generally common side effects of LUPUS. Twitching and spasms are also common in individuals with overactive thyroids.
    If you are having pain with your twitchings, you might want to ask your doctor about "fibromyalgia". Fibromyalgia in SLE is characterized by widespread pain in the muscles and joints, ligaments and tendons. Also fatigue, generalized weakness and non-restfull sleep. All of the above can lead to twitching and spasms. Have you also noticed any of these symptoms: frequent headaches, mood changes, difficulty with concentration, irritable bowel syndrom, urinary urgency? If so, you may be looking at fibromyalgia.
    I hope that I have been helpful. Let me know if you need more information. In the meantime, try the Lupus Foundation of America's web site, they are a wealth of information!
    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie :P

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    Default Muscle Spasms & Twitching

    I have had the unpleasant experience of spasms and twitching. After much medical review it was diagnosed as Essential Tremor Syndrome by my neurologist. It has been controlled with medication and only becomes a bother when my Lupus flares its angry self.
    Miller in Hollister, CA

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    Gwen;
    Thank you so much for the information. I had never heard of Essential Tremor Syndrome....Can you tell me what are the other symptoms of this syndrome??? Perhaps other Lupus sufferers will recognize them.
    Thanks so much
    Saysusie

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    Default Essential Tremor Syndrome

    Here's the website: http://www.essentialtremor.org

    This condition is benign but can be very frustrating when it is activity and not under control.

    What is Essential Tremor?
    Essential tremor is a very common but complex neurologic movement disorder. It's called "essential" because in the past, it had no known cause. It's not caused by another neurological condition or the side effect of a medication. ET usually affects the hands, but it may also affect the head and neck (causing shaking), face, jaw, tongue, voice (causing a shaking or quivering sound), the trunk and, rarely, the legs and feet. The tremor may be a rhythmic "back-and-forth" or "to-and-fro" movement produced by involuntary (unintentional) contractions of the muscle. Severity of the tremors can vary greatly from hour to hour and day to day.
    Some people experience tremor only in certain positions this is called postural tremor. Tremor that worsens while writing or eating is called kinetic or action-specific tremor. Most people with ET have both postural and kinetic tremor.

    Who gets ET?
    As many as 1 in 20 people older than age 40 and 1 in 5 people over 65 may have ET. There may be as many as 10 million people with ET in the United States, and many more worldwide. Essential tremor is much more common than most neurologic disease, with the exception of stroke, and is more common than Parkinson's disease a disorder characterized by resting tremor, stiffness and slowness of movement.
    Miller in Hollister, CA

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    Default

    Gwen;
    Thank you so much for your prompt reply... I am going to do some more research on the Syndrome. I am always trying to learn as much as I can about LUPUS and all of it's outcroping symptoms, illnesses and diseases!
    Again, Thank You
    Saysusie

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