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Thread: Too young to be disabled?

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  1. #1
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    Default Too young to be disabled?

    I'm only twenty, quite a few people aside from my mother who probably understands the most think twenty is far too young to be 'disabled'.
    Suck it up and go work my uncle says, apparently he knows a guy that has lupus and he works hard jobs and the sorts despite having some days he's extremely ill. I personally would work if people would hire me, but they won't because I have issues with pain and it wasn't named to me until I got my blood work back.

    Is that really a reason to not take SSI or government healthcare? He's a guy that has no healthcare what-so-ever because he personally can't afford it either and yet refuses to go take government aid. Am I less of a trustworthy/meaningful person if I take government healthcare, because this is how he's making it sound. What if I have a flare and end up with pleurisy again or I have some sort of issues with my organs?

    I deal with my pain very well, it doesn't usually concern me unless I suddenly become limited due to too much pain.
    It kinda sucks when someone says you're just playing it when you say you're considering seeking help because of being low income.


    What can someone my age do for help?
    Do I just work my butt off and when I can't get out of my bed I apply for disability, because that doesn't exactly sound like what I want for a lifestyle choice. My mom ended up like that, I really don't want to stay in bed all day without me actually choosing to do that. It's depressing.

  2. #2
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    Aleceia--

    First, I want to say I'm sorry you're dealing with all this. It sucks to be young and in pain!

    Second, from this and your last post, it looks to me like you were very recently diagnosed, I think by your primary care doctor? Have you seen a rheumatologist yet? Have you started taking any disease-modifying drugs, like Plaquenil? The reason I ask is that while you are in pain now, there may very well be treatments that will manage your disease quite effectively. Once you're being treated, you are likely to find that your symptoms are diminished or controlled and that you will be well enough to do some sort of work. I don't think there is anything wrong with someone who is disabled applying for Medicaid or SSI (so ignore your uncle on that one!), but I wouldn't assume just yet that you are doomed to a life without employment, on government assistance. Many, many, many people with lupus and similar diseases continue to have full and productive work and personal lives after getting their conditions properly treated and under control. A labor-intensive job probably won't be the one for you, but there is plenty of work people with lupus can do without taking a terrible toll on our bodies.

    By the way, welcome to WHL!

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    It was my primary that stated I could very well have it, but I think ahead to the point of trying to get things figured out. I just do that, no idea why.
    I should see a rheumatologist next week, if they have openings... in my state you can't even go see a Dermatologist without waiting six months, which is completely ridiculous. By the time I was going to see them the condition I was worried about had already gone away physically.

    Well, it's good to know they're there at least. My primary wouldn't talk to me about anything, which was disappointing. I'm asking my mother because I believe she went to a rheumatologist when the doctor through she had RA, in which they discovered she did not.

    The other issue is that there are only labor intensive jobs available in my state for my age group, Maine is full of people who work and work hard. If I could get a security job, especially walking around to an extent, I'd kick butt. But things like gardening, landscaping, painting buildings, and most other jobs like that are outside and require being physically able. Desk jobs require people to have college in like management and stuff like that, which I don't have yet because it's expensive to do college for more than two years.

    What other type of jobs should I search for?

    And thanks.

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    Try not to worry too much until you know exactly what you're dealing with health-wise. I know it's difficult not to speculate, but I know -- at least for myself -- such focus can be problematic for me and put me in a negative head-space. I am very happy to hear you'll be seeing a rheumatologist soon-- he or she will definitely be the person to figure out how best to identify your disease and manage both the disease overall as well as individual symptoms.

    So my question is, what do you want to do for work, ideally, both short-term and long term? I will admit that it has been a while since I've been in the entry-level job market (I'm in my thirties), but I bet there is something out there that you could do that doesn't involve a lot of heavy labor outdoors. Have you considered retail (which I know can have its own physical demands, so it would depend on the job)? Or providing in-home assistance to a developmentally disabled person (my sister did that for a while with no previous training, helping a person shop, prepare meals, do light cleaning, get to appointments, etc.)?

    Or, do you have a longer-term career goal? While college is expensive, many community colleges have one- or two-year certification programs in fields like medical billing and coding, nurses' aides, dental hygienist or assistant, massage, accounting, information technology, nursing, paralegal, retail management, etc. And community colleges are a pretty good deal, cost-wise, and if you're in a lower income bracket (which it sounds like you are) there are federal grants, state grants, and lower-interest loans available to help you fund your education.

    A chronic illness is scary, yes, but it can be managed, and you can have a full life. You are young. You are in a good position right now to make education and career decisions that will work with your illness-- many people with autoimmune disease are diagnosed later in life, after we have made career choices, and find our illnesses and our careers not working well together. So, you are in the unique position to make decisions in light of your illness. Instead of focusing on what you can't do, think about what you can do. And what you want to do. I'm sure there are some community colleges near where you live. Check out their websites and see what sort of professional or technical certification programs they offer. I think you'll be pleased and surprised at the opportunities still out there for you.

    (And do let us know how the rheumatologist appointment goes.)

  5. #5
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    Hi Aleceia, I'm 19 and in school so for me working really isn't an option. I just applied for SSI and SSDI and got denied the disability money because I don't even have enough work credits even though I have been diagnosed since I was old enough to work at 16. I worked at 2 different jobs in the past 3 years and the time I worked wasn't enough to get it. You could try SSI though. I don't know much about all this because I just started to apply for these things last month, but there are a lot of people here who could help you with stuff like that. My advice is don't try to get a job if you don't think you can do it, you're just going to end up making yourself more sick. There is no shame asking for help. These government programs are here for people like us who need it, and they get a bad rap because of people who abuse it. You know your limits don't push them if you don't think you can.
    "A bad cold wouldn't be so annoying if it weren't for the advice of our friends."~ Kin Hubbard

    Diagnosed: SLE, Raynauds, Interstitial Lung Disease, GERD, Myositis, Vasculitis, Fibromyalgia, Possible Sjogrens.
    Medications: 400mg Plaquenil, 2000mg Cellcept, 60mg Nifedipine, Nitroglycerin Patch, 20mg Prilosec, Trazadone, 8mg Medrol, 81mg Asprin.

    My old profile on here http://forum.wehavelupus.com/member.php?22042-ritzbit

  6. #6
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    Derrie-

    I've had so much stress in my life, I've learned to cope pretty well with it. Putting a name to the pain actually makes things a lot more better for me, I'm much calmer about it than I use to be. And yeah, I just hope they take me in quickly. I mean the reading was like 1:80, they said it was high but I've read sites saying it was a low titer... I'm not really sure what to believe about it, all I know is that I show and have had a lot of the eleven 'criteria'.

    I'm not really sure if I want to do long or short term, I don't mind doing the same thing everyday even if it's an on the dot type thing. I've talked with my father about jobs and the job market, I really want to stay self-employed long term. I'd like to do a lot of things, but I specifically want to go to an art college which is expensive. I've tried to get retail jobs, but there are people my age with a lot more experience out there looking for jobs all the time. I never get contacted back, it's really discouraging so I usually reapply every month to a few places until I get sick of filling the application out repeatedly. The job market in my state is really poor and they're hiring people with experience or connections.

    I have attended a community college for two years right out of high school, I just recently dropped it because it was getting ridiculous with a few teachers seriously having it out for me. They made false reports of me harassing people and being a negative influence in class, which the Dean just came down on me like a ban-hammer without even asking my side of the story. I was getting sick from the stress of trying to get out of that mess and keep my grades up. I didn't see any reason to continue college without a positive, stress free environment I had for the first year of my college experience. I will never go back to a community college.

    Otherwise, I would like to do a lot of things and take up some skills. I've gone to technical schools while I was in high school which was very fun, but they don't exactly teach marketing and I didn't have the time for it with my other tech school things. I took and completed three years of Web Design and Development specifically. It hasn't brought money in at all, but I think it's due to Maine having a really closed market on internet advertisement.

    But you're right, I certainly needed to hear that. I guess I should make my career choice worth it now, slow down and make the correct choices for my future. Work what I can and save up, because honestly I wanted to go move in with my friend and her mother. They own their home and I'd like to restore old classic/antique cars and other objects some day. Yeah...

    (I certainly will post when it happens)

    --

    rizbit2-

    Yeah, I was thinking about SSI. Which would probably be alright with me (I could maybe buy clothes for once and pay rent, woah). I honestly don't know much about it but I'll certainly also ask people I know personally that probably know, I have quite a few family members with disabilities... My whole family has genetic issues I think, we're just not right sometimes. And thanks for the encouragement, it's very helpful to me.


    Thanks you two.

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