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Thread: Night shades fruits and vegetables

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    Default Night shades fruits and vegetables

    Does anyone know where I can find a list of night shade fruits and vegetables? I have searched the net but can not find a complete list.
    I have a very big issue with eating and need to check this list.
    Thanks
    Lea
    SLE Lupus diagnosed 8/8/11
    COPD,Raynauda's, IBS, Asthma, Sleep Apena, Amenia and Arthritis,Diabetes,Reflux TMJ, temporal arteritis
    Half dead, cripple and crazy but still above ground.
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    Hi Leaann,

    What are night shade fruits and vegetables? I've never heard the term.

    Brenda

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    I was reading on line about lupus where it said that it was best to stay away from night shaded fruits and veggies. But the article that I was reading only told me that sweet potatoes were not night shaded, That's why i am trying to find out about it. I have a sever problem with eating from IBS that I have along with flaring and was thinking that if I could try a find out what night shades were then maybe that would help. I had to remove a lot of things from my diet as it is, such as chicken, turkey, corn meal, processed food, and certain milk products. so I figured I would give this a try and see what happen.

    I was talking to my dad, who was a county agent and he says that night shaded veggies are things like brown potatoes, egg plants but still not sure what they mean by that. I am hoping for a complete list from someone or some where. Hope this helps, if you find out anything please post. I think that it might be helpful for others as well
    Lea
    SLE Lupus diagnosed 8/8/11
    COPD,Raynauda's, IBS, Asthma, Sleep Apena, Amenia and Arthritis,Diabetes,Reflux TMJ, temporal arteritis
    Half dead, cripple and crazy but still above ground.
    Medication
    Novolog injections, Medrol injections, MTX injections, Dicyclomine, Plaqulin, Iron, Spreva inhaler, Advair inhaler, Albuteral inhaler, Fish Oil, Calcium, Diclofenac, Citalopram and doxcycline

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    I was just reading your post and decided to look it up, my first try revealed whfoods and here is a quote:
    "Potatoes, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, eggplant, tomatillos, tamarios, pepinos, pimentos, paprika, cayenne, and Tabasco sauce are classified as nightshade foods. A particular group of substances in these foods, called alkaloids, can impact nerve-muscle function and digestive function in animals and humans, and may also be able to compromise joint function. Because the amount of alkaloids is very low in nightshade foods when compared with other nightshade plants, health problems from nightshade foods may only occur in individuals who are especially sensitive to these alkaloid substances. Since cooking only lowers alkaloid content of nightshade foods by about 40-50%, highly sensitive individuals may want to avoid this category of food altogether, while non-sensitive individuals may be able to eat these foods, especially in cooked form, without problem. Green and sprouted spots on potatoes usually reflect high alkaloid content, even though the green itself involves the presence of chlorophyll, not alkaloids. For this reason, sprouted areas should always be thoroughly removed before potato cooking, or the potatoes should be discarded altogether. "
    "Nightshades are a diverse group of foods, herbs, shrubs, and trees that have fascinated scientists, doctors, and nutritionists for centuries. "Nightshade" is actually the common name used to describe over 2,800 species of plants, many with very different properties and constituents. All of the plants, however, belong to a scientific order called Polemoniales, and to a scientific family called Solanaceae. To give you an idea of the diversity associated with this group of plants, consider the fact that tobacco, morning glory, potato, and tomato are all classified as nightshades. "

    "Nightshades are actually more famous as drugs than as foods. The best-known nightshades when it comes to pharmacy include mandrake (Mandragora officinum), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and belladonna, also called deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna).

    What has interested scientists most about nightshades in a pharmacological sense is a group of compounds in them called alkaloids. The alkaloids found in nightshades are not only the basis for consideration of nightshades as drugs, but also for understanding adverse reactions to nightshades when they are eaten as food. Adverse reactions to nightshade alkaloids are discussed further in the health effects section of this nightshade profile."

    "Nightshade vegetables and fruit

    The most famous food members of the nightshade family include potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum), many species of sweet and hot peppers (all species of Capsicum, including Capsicum annum), and eggplant (Solanum melongena). Less well know, but equally genuine nightshade foods include ground cherries (all species of Physalis), tomatillos (Physallis ixocapra), garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasum), tamarillos (Cyphomandra betacea), pepinos (Solanum muricatum), and naranjillas (Solanum quitoense). Pimentos (also called pimientos) belong to the nightshade family, and usually come from the pepper plant Capsicum annum. Pimento cheese and pimento-stuffed olives are therefore examples of foods that should be classified as containing nightshade components. Although the sweet potato, whose scientific name is Ipomoea batatas, belongs to the same plant order as the nightshades (Polemoniales), it does not belong to the Solanaceae family found in this order, but to a different plant family called Convolvulaceae."

    Nightshade spices

    The seasoning paprika is also derived from Capsicum annum, the common red pepper, and the seasoning cayenne comes from another nightshade, Capsicum frutenscens. Tabasco sauce, which contains large amounts of Capsicum annum, should also be considered as a nightshade food. It may be helpful to note here that black pepper, which belongs to the Piperaceae family, is not a member of the nightshade foods.

    ~I hope this helps you out. And I learned something new in the process- thank you!

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    According to the Lupus Foundation the ONLY food that should be avoided by all lupus patients are alphalfa seeds and sprouts. There are no other foods that, across the boad, cause us harm. Please do not be fooled by people trying to sell their goods or books into going on special "lupus diets" because there are not any.

    This is not to say that certain people might not need to stay away from certain foods but as far as Lupus itself is concerned, only alphalfa are a problem
    Last edited by tgal; 03-26-2012 at 08:22 PM.
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    Thanks Jodi,

    I am glad that you were able to find something out about it. I had looked and looked and couldn't find enough information. This well help. I don't agree that this is something that all lupus people try, it is just that I have had a very difficult time eating for other reasons and decided to see if this would change anything. If nothing else maybe I could lose weight or something good would come out of it.
    Well at least we learned something.

    Thanks again
    Lea
    SLE Lupus diagnosed 8/8/11
    COPD,Raynauda's, IBS, Asthma, Sleep Apena, Amenia and Arthritis,Diabetes,Reflux TMJ, temporal arteritis
    Half dead, cripple and crazy but still above ground.
    Medication
    Novolog injections, Medrol injections, MTX injections, Dicyclomine, Plaqulin, Iron, Spreva inhaler, Advair inhaler, Albuteral inhaler, Fish Oil, Calcium, Diclofenac, Citalopram and doxcycline

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    lea,
    i also decided to follow a few healthy eating guides.
    so my family could loose weight.
    one in - all in syndrome.
    we now do not eat normal potatoes.
    as they are a night shade.

    sweet potatoes are not.
    so we eat those instead.

    it is an easy change to make.
    and the lack of starch, (or whatever it is),also makes a big difference.

    not everyone has the same results though.


    this diet is for weight control, not lupus
    Last edited by steve.b; 03-27-2012 at 09:33 PM. Reason: stopping mis understanding.

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    Nightshades, like Atkins, Mayo, etc etc can help with weight loss and that alone may make one feel better. The only point that must be made clear is that it is NOT a Lupus diet nor has it been proven to help with our inflammation in any way.

    I don't mean to sound harsh it is just that the policy of WHL is to make sure that any diets, medicines etc that we push are medically approved. We want to make sure that there is never a time where people can say "But I heard at WHL that this unapproved (fill in the blank) works well) and then have someone get more ill or even die from it.

    There is no issue with people doing things to help them look/feel better because attitude is everything. Just understand that Nightshades is not an approved diet for helping Lupus patients even though it may help greatly with weight loss. Just make sure to check with your doctor first
    Last edited by tgal; 03-27-2012 at 09:47 PM.
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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