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Thread: Ovarian Cysts and Lupus

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    Default Ovarian Cysts and Lupus

    Ok, so here's the question...

    I have a very painful 5 cm cyst on my ovary. In addition to it being it's own really horrible nuisance, it also affects my hormones which in turn I believe is affecting my lupus. My OBGYN doesn't want to remove it yet becuause the normal tactic in these situations is to "wait and see". My concern is that it is going to throw me into a major flare up if it's not taken out. Has anyone every had experience with this before? I know that estrogen is directly connected to lupus flares... how can I convince my OB that this is going to affect me in ways that it wouldn't affect a person without lupus?

    Thanks for your help!! :cry:
    "The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances; if there is any reaction, both are transformed." - Jung

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    Saysusie is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the Universe
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    Here is an explanation of ovarian cysts and why doctors generaly "wait and see" Many women with Lupus have suffered with ovarian cysts. It has been found that there are hormonal influences in autoimmune disease, particularly in systemic lupus. Also, the use of oral contraceptives, could, on occasion, be associated with flares of the disease. Multiple cystic disease of the ovaries was present in 40 of 100 women studied in a particular case. Another case study reorted the following:
    "Polycystic ovarian disease causes a continuing estrus in young females, and there is unopposed action of the feminizing oestrogens. These cause an exaggerated immune response. It has been shown that clinical activity of the disease varies according to the levels of these oestrogens. There is no correlation with other hormone levels. Of 360 patients with SLE, 100 had multiple ovarian cysts and are currently being studied. In addition, endometriosis was present in 123 of the 149, and 88 of the 360 patients appeared to have both multiple ovarian cysts as well as endometriosis. In addition to increased prolactin levels, there is a decrease in luteotrophic hormone production. It is of interest that increased amounts of 16-OH metabolites are also associated with breast carcinoma and liver cirrhosis. The administration of thyroid hormone, excessive exercise, smoking, alcohol, and a strict vegetarian diet may shift the metabolism of oestrone to the other metabolites, which then results in an increase of osteoporosis."

    Ovarian Cysts:
    Ovarian cysts are fairly common -- on one hand, you could say every women who ovulates gets a small cyst every month, just before the egg is released. Often cysts have no symptoms and are only discovered as an aside on a routine exam. Sometimes cysts cause pain, pelvic pressure or even nausea.
    One type of ovarian cyst is a called a functional cyst. This occurs when the egg is not released and the follicular fluid that surrounds the egg remains. Functional cysts range in size, most commonly being only a centimeter or so in diameter but occasionally as large as 8-10 centimeters (grapefruit-sized). These usually disappear by themselves within a few cycles, although the larger ones may cause enough pain to warrant removal.

    Another common benign cyst is a hemorrhagic cyst; this is one that fills with blood in the process of ovulation and, again, will most often go away without any intervention. If a hemorrhagic cyst leaks, it may cause significant pain, requiring a laparoscopy ("belly-button surgery" that uses small tools inserted through one or more tiny slits in the abdomen).Sometimes cysts are complex, either containing partly fluid elements and partly solid elements or having septations (walls) within a fluid-filled cyst. In general, complex cysts are evaluated further, as some complex cysts may be cancerous. Your age and symptoms must be taken into account. Depending on exactly how the cyst looks on ultrasound, your doctor may recommend blood work, a CT or MRI scan to get a better look at the cyst, or even surgery to remove the cyst. Many times a complex cyst can be evaluated via laparoscopy, but sometimes a large abdominal incision is required.

    FYI
    Peace and Blessings
    Saysusie

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    Hello , I'm sherr I was diagnosed with SLE the month of September 2010 . I was doing fine until last year when I had a CT Scan done and it showed that I have 3half semi-fluid cyst on my left ovary and one semi on my right ovary. Well just the other day I had another CT Scan done because of pain that I was having , and it showed that one of the cyst had gotten bigger 6.4x3.7 .I will talk to my OBGYN on Monday , schedule for an appt. to decide what needs to be done. i've since been wondering if there is a connection to the lupus .

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    I have cysts as well, the pain was so bad, I went to see the gyno and she is putting me on a low dose of progesterone everyday.She says hopefully that will work to reduce the cramping,otherwise we will think about hysterectomy.

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    I had multiple cysts are the same time, they did ultrasounds and said to come back in six weeks. By then both ovaries were nothing but cysts. I ended up with a complete hysterectomy as I was also bleeding almost continually. Whether the cause was Hashimoto's disease or Lupus is up for grabs. My 2 rheumies each think differently.

    By the way, the pathologist said that my uterus was just starting to be cancerous. But that is just a small chance as I understand it. We must always be careful when something different starts happening with our bodies.

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    I had to have a hysterectomy because there were so many cysts and the bleeding was so heavy! I bled for months (TMI) but so true. -(

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    I have lupus and have had ovarian cysts and had 2 removed. my eldest daughter has had 4 very extremely large cysts removed and she has lupus and endometriosis and is prescribed the pill. I also recently had scare when they thought I cervical cancer but I was a polyp. but these are things my gyno said we are more likely to get because of lupus . and because we take immune suppressant drugs.

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