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Thread: Going against medical advice

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    Cool Going against medical advice

    I'm naughty.

    I have a spleen that enlarges sometimes, and sticks right past my ribcage. The biggest no-no when this happens is to participate in a contact sport, because it's so tense and unprotected, trauma can cause it to rupture.

    However I still went horse riding yesterday.

    I got diagnosed a few days after I had my first riding lesson with a new coach, and it's unbelievably good. I'm riding a 16.3hh warmblood who does medium dressage, which is kinda like learning to play the cello on a Stradivarius. Or learning to drive racecars in a McLaren F1. Novices like me never get to ride horses like that. My coach is also brilliant, and I love going out there to ride.

    So to be told a few days later that horse riding is bad for me was a double blow. I spoke to my doc and my coach, and I've decided that I will keep riding. I'm going to take it cautiously, only do dressage and no jumping, and if my spleen is really big I'll postpone until it's smaller.
    I probably should be wearing a body protector (like body armour) when I ride but I HATE them, big and stiff and bulky and hot. I'd rather learn to ride properly and safely than be lulled into a false sense of security wearing one.

    My coach is ok with this and we are going to take my lessons a bit slower, take less risks and if I look wobbly we will work on the basics more. If I do fall off, she knows I'll have to go to ED to be assessed. But Toby (the horse) is lovely, not spooky and doesn't run sideways (best way to make me fall off).

    Besides, I need to take care of my mental health. Right?
    Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by a-holes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brandywine View Post
    I'm naughty.

    I have a spleen that enlarges sometimes, and sticks right past my ribcage. The biggest no-no when this happens is to participate in a contact sport, because it's so tense and unprotected, trauma can cause it to rupture.

    However I still went horse riding yesterday.

    I got diagnosed a few days after I had my first riding lesson with a new coach, and it's unbelievably good. I'm riding a 16.3hh warmblood who does medium dressage, which is kinda like learning to play the cello on a Stradivarius. Or learning to drive racecars in a McLaren F1. Novices like me never get to ride horses like that. My coach is also brilliant, and I love going out there to ride.

    So to be told a few days later that horse riding is bad for me was a double blow. I spoke to my doc and my coach, and I've decided that I will keep riding. I'm going to take it cautiously, only do dressage and no jumping, and if my spleen is really big I'll postpone until it's smaller.
    I probably should be wearing a body protector (like body armour) when I ride but I HATE them, big and stiff and bulky and hot. I'd rather learn to ride properly and safely than be lulled into a false sense of security wearing one.

    My coach is ok with this and we are going to take my lessons a bit slower, take less risks and if I look wobbly we will work on the basics more. If I do fall off, she knows I'll have to go to ED to be assessed. But Toby (the horse) is lovely, not spooky and doesn't run sideways (best way to make me fall off).

    Besides, I need to take care of my mental health. Right?
    It is the policy here at WHL to always defer medical advice to your doctor. Lupus is a disease that can destroy your body if you do not take your meds and follow the advice your doctor gives you. Lupus can kill you. Most of us have had to modify our lifestyle in one way or another ( or in many ways) in order to give our bodies a chance at fighting this disease. While no one here can make you do anything please understand that we also will not and cannot support going against medical advice that could lead you to physical harm.

    I do, however, wish you the best of luck.
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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    a little advice from a fellow horse lover.

    rising to the trot is not good for you, if you have inflamation in the chest area.
    i presume it would not be good in your case also.

    the bouncing agrevates the sore area.

    i pleasure ride only.
    but i still ride

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    Another horse-person here...for me, life without horses is no life at all. Like saying "life without breathing", or "life without family".

    I totally understand your "quality-of-life" decision...and I also understand that a burst spleen can kill you pretty d@mn fast.

    PLEASE wear the vest, and talk to your doctor about how to be as safe as you can. Your riding skill makes no difference - statistically, accidents are evenly spread among beginners, intermediate, advanced, and professional riders. No matter how good you are or how "properly" you ride, THERE IS NO STATISTICAL ADVANTAGE in terms of catastrophic accidents. Be ready (or as ready as you can be). I am a big advocate of helmets (which is rough, because I now ride in the Western world where they are frowned upon) - but because of your spleen condition, you may also need a "body helmet". Please, please, PLEASE - if you MUST ride...(and I get that)...RIDE SAFE.

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    Sorry forgot to mention that I discussed this with my GP and she says that it is fine as long as I keep to the precautions I outlined. But if I had insurance, they use that as a get-out clause. So I'm going against the standard advice but my doctor actually supports me.

    I think it's a matter of risk assessment, in my case I will keep the risks of falling off low so I can keep enjoying my sport. But I will still wear a seatbelt in a car, despite the fact that in a minor prang it could pop my spleen. The risks it mitigates in a high-speed crash means I will always wear it.

    steve.bryce, why is rising trot so bad? I thought it'd be sitting trot... but it's nice to know there are other riders out there. I can understand rugby and kickboxing being on the list of no-nos, but was gutted to see horse riding there. Disappointed about not jumping as I really wanted to do more of that but I can still enjoy low-level dressage.
    Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by a-holes.

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    any activity that causes yuour inflamed area to be jolted, is considered bad.

    my wife has had both knees replaced. she is allowed to ride at a walk, gallop a little, but not trot.
    it is the jirking of the dammaged area that is the problem.


    sitting to the trot is usually a lope, rather than a traditional up and down trot, therefore there is no jirking.
    rising to the trot, means you are either bouncing the stomach area or rigid flexxing of the muscles, thereby constricting the area.


    depends on your riding style.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve.bryce View Post
    any activity that causes yuour inflamed area to be jolted, is considered bad.

    my wife has had both knees replaced. she is allowed to ride at a walk, gallop a little, but not trot.
    it is the jirking of the dammaged area that is the problem.


    sitting to the trot is usually a lope, rather than a traditional up and down trot, therefore there is no jirking.
    rising to the trot, means you are either bouncing the stomach area or rigid flexxing of the muscles, thereby constricting the area.


    depends on your riding style.
    Okay that makes more sense now, I'm riding english dressage, not western. My horse has a huge up-and-down trot (good for dressage), so sitting is incredibly bouncy but rising is smooth and easy. When I get my own horse it'll be one with smooth paces!

    I'm reconsidering my view of a body protector. However I can't find any evidence to say that it will help with my spleen. Broken ribs, back injury yes, but spleen? My old one was huge and bulky but there are newer nicer (expensive) ones now. My riding coach suggested one of those wrap-around back supports, but would that work? My friend suggested putting springs on my bum.... I always land on my bum....
    Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you are not, in fact, just surrounded by a-holes.

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    Tgal is right, we can't and won't tell you that it's ok, it must be your choice.
    If you ask me if I would do it, my answer is NO, I wouldn't. To me the risk is not worth it.

    Debbie
    I may have been dealt a bad hand, but at least I'm still playing with a full deck. ( most of the time anyway).

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    Thanks, Tgal, I actually didn't know that Lupus could kill...I have had some friends recommend that I try holistic treatments instead of my doctor's prescriptions but I haven't ventured down that route. I am thankful that I've read some of your posts. This is informative and good to know. It's a little bit scary too

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ellie Hansen View Post
    ...I have had some friends recommend that I try holistic treatments instead of my doctor's prescriptions....
    please do not stop your doctors medicine.
    anything that cannot work alongside of conventinal medicine is not worth the risk.

    i know friends who practice certain types of holistic.
    they even agree with the last comment.

    if it is not proven.... think twice.
    if it requires you to stop what you know works...... keep away.

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