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Thread: Stubbed toe, pinched fingers!

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    Default Stubbed toe, pinched fingers!

    This may be my weirdest question to date...but do any of you experience ridiculous, sharp, breath-taking pain when you stub your toes or jam your fingers?

    I have no idea if this is lupus related or just crazy old me....but I always feel like my reaction is overkill to what should just be a small injury but it hurts more than just about anything I can describe.May be that everyone feels this too...(well, except my husband who always gives me a look, lol!)
    Bunny

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    Oh I get that I always wondered that too. Like when I stub my elbow it seems like it hurts and stays in pain longer than it should be. I think it might be bc lupus affects our nervous system and were extra sensitive, well I know I am. Even if it isn't lupus it still hurts.

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    rob is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the World
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    I'm not sure if this is the same as what you are experiencing. The best way to describe what happens to me, is that I have pain that is totally out of proportion to the injury or painful stimuli.

    The other day, I accidentally nicked a fingertip with an X-acto knife. Just a tiny cut, not even big enough for a band-aid, but when I went to rinse it off with some tap water, it felt like a frakking ice pick in my finger and I felt it all the way up into my elbow. Same thing when I get a little splinter of wood in a finger and go to pull it out. Stub my toe? Same thing.

    Weird stuff. I'm sure in my case it's something neurological in nature. I keep meaning to talk to my Neuro about it, but it's something that gets bumped down my priority list each time. Gonna make a post-it note to remind myself to ask about it next visit.

    Rob
    Last edited by rob; 12-21-2011 at 12:51 PM.

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    I also get severe pain with hitting my toes or fingers. I also have patches where I get severe pain eg on the inside of my right wrist where they twice tried to take blood...... Just like the needle hit a nerve and it hurt so bad for hours after. Since recently being diag with Lupus and Fibromyalgia .. I put it down to the Fibromyalgia. That was just my opinion as me too I had just put it to the back burner. On the wrist the only thing that works for the extreme pain is an ice pack!
    Desley
    For every dark cloud there is a silver lining!
    Diagnosed: Lupus; mesenteric panniculitis; fat nacrosis;

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    Yes, same here. It also seems that it takes me longer to heal or to get over an injury than others.
    Hugs,
    Marla

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    Me too - super-low pain tolerance. I read someplace, and my Rheum confirmed, that for Lupus patients (and also other AI diseases like Sjogren's, etc), often the Parasympathetic nervous system does not function well.

    In case you're not familiar with it, the nervous system operates in different modes - Sympathetic and Parasympathetic: the Sympathetic system - ironically - is the part of the nervous system involved in pain reactions, fight-and-flight, among other things - and the Parasympathetic system is what calms everything down after the initial pain response, releases those feel-good endorphins, etc - basically the body processes that make you feel better after that original "ouch!" response.

    In normally-functioning systems, if you stub your toe, for instance, the Sympathetic nervous response communicates a big "OH SHIZZLE!!!!" so you move away from the painful situation (like when your hand jerks back involuntarily from a flame), and then almost immediately the Parasympathetic system kicks in to calm you down - physically as well as emotionally - once the "threat" is identified (all those complicated hormones, etc).

    But if course if your Parasympathetic system is compromised by Lupus or anything else, it's going to mean you feel pain longer and "louder" than most people do.

    Lucky us, huh?????

    I did have a researcher friend (he works on chronic pain disorders) recommend taking extra magnesium - particularly Magnesium Sulfate, as it seems to be involved in mediating pain responses, and often people with chronic pain (migraines, joint pain, etc) utilize Magnesium badly - like we do with Vitamin D, too. That's not an "official" thing - he's doing research on it - but it's probably not going to do any harm to take some extra Magnesium as long as you don't over-do it.

    My Neuro put me on daily Magnesium Citrate to help with migraines, and it does seem to help. Or at least I tend to get more of them when I run out of my Magnesium and don't take it for a while. Again - that's anecdotal evidence - and even on the supplements I am still a TOTAL WIMP with pain, but I put it out there in case it might help somebody.

    I also think all this stuff is kind of interesting. I just wish I didn't know about it first-hand...!!!!!

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    Nice to know I am not alone.

    I don't think of it as a low-pain threshold as I figured i was pretty tough, lol but that might all be in my head. I remember while in labour, telling the nurse, that I can handle pain, I've run a marathon, lol!

    I like the sympathetic, parasympathetic explanation too.

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    Bunny,
    Yes, I had five babies with absolutely no meds (4 at home) pre-AI diseases. Now, I feel like a complainer with all my aches and pains.
    Hugs,
    Marla

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    YUP! Our pain tolerance (INTOLERANCE!) goes down a few notches when we have an autoimmune disease. I read about it in an article from Cleveland Clinic. Also ROB, I DO KNOW since we have MS as well, that since our myelinsheath(im not sure if thats spelled right) is getting destroyed OUR nerves are more sensitive to EVERYTHING due to being more exposed. We dont have that protective coating like someone without MS. LUCKY US HUH! I know i have NEVER been more SENSITIVE to pain and/or anything else in my life! Put it this way, when i go in for blood work I WALK in BUT Im ALWAYS WHEELED OUT! Pale as hell and my hair is drenched with sweat! My blood pressure always drops to 80 (i cant remember the bottom # LOL) over something and they are having to flip me upside down in the bed! Then i get home and pull the band aid off and i already have a BIG BRUISE! No woo hoo to THAT!
    We Live in a MORTAL, FRAIL, IMPERFECT world in which the word "FAIR" doesn't always apply.Make EVERY MOMENT COUNT with the ones you LOVE because it can end in the blink of an eye. Love, Jeannette

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