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Thread: Can anyone translate my test results for me please?

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    Question Can anyone translate my test results for me please?

    This honestly means nothing to me but is what my doctor has written in my notes to the rheumo...

    He said it is worth mentioning the folowing:

    ESR: 9mm
    CRP: 5.8
    ANA screen: positive, patern #1 homogenous titre 1/640
    Seruf RF: <20kIU/L
    dsDNA: 14.3 IU/ml
    ENA screen: negative

    The doctor said that he suspects lupus but some tests conflict eachother.

    Hope someone can help. Thankyou

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shine View Post
    This honestly means nothing to me but is what my doctor has written in my notes to the rheumo...

    He said it is worth mentioning the folowing:

    ESR: 9mm
    CRP: 5.8
    ANA screen: positive, patern #1 homogenous titre 1/640
    Seruf RF: <20kIU/L
    dsDNA: 14.3 IU/ml
    ENA screen: negative

    The doctor said that he suspects lupus but some tests conflict eachother.

    Hope someone can help. Thankyou

    Hi Shine!

    I am going to post a link from the Lupus Foundation that should give you more information about the tests. After looking over it, if you still have more questions then stop back by

    What does that mean? Lupus Tests
    Mari

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    ~Winston Churchill~







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    I know that Mari posted information for you. Did it help you? I am just going to give you some brief explanations of your tests. If, after the explanation and reading the post referred to you, you still have more questions about the tests, please let us know and we will answer them as best as we can.
    Each of the tests you listed are used in conjunction with other tests and/or with each other in order to help doctors determine if there is an auto-immune disorder occurring within your body. No one test alone is enough to make this determination.

    ESR = erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). This test measures inflammation in the body. Lupus is a disease that causes inflammation throughout the body. If the ESR levels are high, then doctors know that there is some inflammation.

    CRP = C-reactive Protein. This is another test to determine inflammation in the body. C-reactive protein is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body.

    ANA =The ANA (antinuclear antibody) is used to detect auto-antibodies that react against components of the nucleus of the body's cells. Most people with lupus test positive for ANA. Usually, along with the ANA test, your doctor will take other tests that can help determine the presence of three specific types of anti-bodies that are found in Lupus patients: anti-dsDNA (anti-double-stranded DNA), anti-Sm (anti-Smith antibodies), and anti-RNP antibodies. The anti-dsDNA and anti-RNP tests confirm whether there are antibodies being produced to the genetic material in the cell. The anti-Sm test measures if there are antibodies against a certain protein found in the nucleus of cells. When either the anti-dsDNA or the anti-Sm antibody test is positive, a person is usually considered to have SLE. Knowing which particular antibody is responsible for the positive ANA test can help determine which autoimmune disease is present.

    Seruf R F = Rheumatoid Factor.

    Rhematoid factor is an antibody that is measurable in the blood and it can bind to other antibodies. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is not usually present in the normal individual. Lupus is considered a rheumatic disease (diseases that cause inflammation, pain & swelling of the joints and muscles).High levels of rheumatoid factor indicates the presence of a rheumatic disease.

    ENA = Extractable Nuclear Antigen.
    The ENA panel is usually ordered following a positive ANA test in people who have clinical signs of an auto-immune disorder. The 4-test ENA panel is used to help diagnose mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), Lupus, and Sjogren syndrome. The 6-test ENA can also help identify scleroderma and polymyositis.



    Some of your tests results are high, some are negative. This is why your doctor says they are conflicting one another. However, this is not at all unusual in Lupus patients. You may have Lupus without high levels of inflammation or without some of the antibodies. Then again, you may have some auto-immune issues occurring, but not Lupus. I am sure that your doctor will want to run further tests or he may decide to just begin to treat the symptoms that you are displaying.
    I hope that this has been somewhat helpful to you. Please let us know if you need more information.

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Look For The Good and Praise It!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saysusie View Post
    I know that Mari posted information for you. Did it help you? I am just going to give you some brief explanations of your tests. If, after the explanation and reading the post referred to you, you still have more questions about the tests, please let us know and we will answer them as best as we can.
    Each of the tests you listed are used in conjunction with other tests and/or with each other in order to help doctors determine if there is an auto-immune disorder occurring within your body. No one test alone is enough to make this determination.

    ESR = erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). This test measures inflammation in the body. Lupus is a disease that causes inflammation throughout the body. If the ESR levels are high, then doctors know that there is some inflammation.

    CRP = C-reactive Protein. This is another test to determine inflammation in the body. C-reactive protein is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body.

    ANA =The ANA (antinuclear antibody) is used to detect auto-antibodies that react against components of the nucleus of the body's cells. Most people with lupus test positive for ANA. Usually, along with the ANA test, your doctor will take other tests that can help determine the presence of three specific types of anti-bodies that are found in Lupus patients: anti-dsDNA (anti-double-stranded DNA), anti-Sm (anti-Smith antibodies), and anti-RNP antibodies. The anti-dsDNA and anti-RNP tests confirm whether there are antibodies being produced to the genetic material in the cell. The anti-Sm test measures if there are antibodies against a certain protein found in the nucleus of cells. When either the anti-dsDNA or the anti-Sm antibody test is positive, a person is usually considered to have SLE. Knowing which particular antibody is responsible for the positive ANA test can help determine which autoimmune disease is present.

    Seruf R F = Rheumatoid Factor.

    Rhematoid factor is an antibody that is measurable in the blood and it can bind to other antibodies. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is not usually present in the normal individual. Lupus is considered a rheumatic disease (diseases that cause inflammation, pain & swelling of the joints and muscles).High levels of rheumatoid factor indicates the presence of a rheumatic disease.

    ENA = Extractable Nuclear Antigen.
    The ENA panel is usually ordered following a positive ANA test in people who have clinical signs of an auto-immune disorder. The 4-test ENA panel is used to help diagnose mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), Lupus, and Sjogren syndrome. The 6-test ENA can also help identify scleroderma and polymyositis.



    Some of your tests results are high, some are negative. This is why your doctor says they are conflicting one another. However, this is not at all unusual in Lupus patients. You may have Lupus without high levels of inflammation or without some of the antibodies. Then again, you may have some auto-immune issues occurring, but not Lupus. I am sure that your doctor will want to run further tests or he may decide to just begin to treat the symptoms that you are displaying.
    I hope that this has been somewhat helpful to you. Please let us know if you need more information.

    Peace and Blessings
    Namaste
    Saysusie
    Wonderful post
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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    Thankyou so much, especially for replying so quickly. This kind of stuff always plays on my mind.

    Both posts are really helpful. I think I'm starting to understand.

    So can you say which results are high? Which are low? The positive and negative results are pretty obvious just the others. I'm in Australia and will be moving interstate at the end of next week so have to go see another GP and get another referral to a rheumo, otherwise I could have been seeing one in 2 weeks but don't know how long it will take now. My mind likes to play on things. I have so many random symptoms that could maybe possibly be related to Lupus but I don't want to go in there with a massive list of things because then I'll just sound like a hypochondriac who has been spening too much time looking up symptoms on the internet. Which may be partially true lol. But they DO link up. It would explain so many things.

    Thankyou again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shine View Post
    Thankyou so much, especially for replying so quickly. This kind of stuff always plays on my mind.

    Both posts are really helpful. I think I'm starting to understand.

    So can you say which results are high? Which are low? The positive and negative results are pretty obvious just the others. I'm in Australia and will be moving interstate at the end of next week so have to go see another GP and get another referral to a rheumo, otherwise I could have been seeing one in 2 weeks but don't know how long it will take now. My mind likes to play on things. I have so many random symptoms that could maybe possibly be related to Lupus but I don't want to go in there with a massive list of things because then I'll just sound like a hypochondriac who has been spening too much time looking up symptoms on the internet. Which may be partially true lol. But they DO link up. It would explain so many things.

    Thankyou again.
    We can't really answer the "high or low" question because different doctors use different criteria. If you look on your test results there will be a 'normal range". You then look to see if the if your results are over or under the range listed. If you want to post the range numbers here we might be able to explain a bit better.
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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    Hi Shine,

    You mention moving interstate - which state?
    Maybe one of our WHL family here in Australia can suggest a good rheumy.
    All the best with the shift, know it can be very exhausting.
    I moved from WA to Gold Coast in June and are just getting Specialists reorganised. I've been lucky and had very good people recommended by my Perth Specialists.

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    Was this a QML test or s&n test? Which state are you in / going to?

    Im in QLD... if they are the qml style test I think the conflict your doc speaks of is the positive ANA, negative ENA and the low ESR. An ESR under 12 is normal from QML and under 20 is normal for S&N. Apparently anything under 10mm is normal for ESR.
    For example, mine has never been in normal levels and is typically around the 14-24 mark but has been muuuuuuch higher still. Your dsDNA is borderline. Cant comment on anything else : ) Dont assume I am right either, dont be afraid to ask your doctor for a detailed explanation of your results... I can not stress this enough THEY WORK FOR YOU! : ) You pay them ALOT of money, so get your moneys worth!

    The S&N tests are a bit more of a nuisance so I always ask the doctor to send me to QML as their testing is straight forward and they explain the results in the report.

    If you are coming to QLD I know a lovely place for specialists in Brisbane, I am really happy with it. They have a number of specialists.

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    I'm actually heading from SA to the Gold Coast/Brisbane area. I'll be staying in Ormeau outside of Brisbane so any advice about rheumotologists in that kind of area would be great. I don't have private healthcare and I am just relying on basic bulk billing services atm. Unfortunately I can't afford to go private so any info about doing it on the cheap is also greatly appreciated!

    Thankyou so much everyone x

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    You would have to go through the hospitals then as they are the only free clinics. However I dont have private health care either and still go through private means. You get a percentage back through medicare and it is well worth it. They spend more time with you, they actually WORK for your health. When I went through the public free clinics the guys just did the basic blood tests on my visits and told me that I was lucky to have mild lupus. He never adressed any of my concerns.

    My private specialist costs me $30 a visit. She spends half an hour with me, checking me out thoroughly, looking at my blood work, discussing how I feel and how we can make me feel better etc. She actually cares, she gives me follow up phone calls and does the leg work on teaming up with other specialists and making sure I am well. The difference is enormous. She is calm, not rushed, the environment is comfortable and I really get the feeling she is 'working'. The free clinic is rushed, they have busy waiting rooms, they just feel like they are going through the motions instead of actually 'working'. I wont go back to free clinics ever again!

    I would highly recommend you also visit private specialists, there is a bigger initial outlay, but then following visits are cheaper. I was HORRIBLY neglected by the free clinic for almost five years. They didn't address some neurological issues that they should have. I wasnt given the right knowledge, testing or treatment.

    Private isnt as bad as you think... my life was saved because of a private specialist... when the public system would not touch my case because of the risk of legal issues. The private specialist let me pay off my bill... $900 for life saving surgery. $900!! I paid it off over a few months and had my life. Of course the private hospital was $3000 LOL! and they wouldnt let me pay that off... but there are some private specialists that will do private surgery in public hospitals, I just didnt have time to find one.

    My specialists are at the Greenslopes specialist centre. There is another specialist centre in slacks creek. I am certain there would be one around Ormeau or the G/C.

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