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Thread: Burning sensation

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    Default Burning sensation

    I have SLE. Lately, in the last 4 years, I have been experiencing a lot of burning in my legs. This has crept up to my stomach. It is largely set off by being 'too hot' but I find it happens at other times too.

    Also, sometimes I am having a LOT of trouble sleeping.

    Do either of these things sound like lupus problems?
    kathyf

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    Welcome kathy. I'm not sure how much I can help. THe only thing I can think of is the possibility that you have developed neuropathy. I just recently developed burning in my hands and feet and the doctor thinks it is neuropathy. I'm not sure if neuropathic pain can affect as large of an area as you are describing though. Maybe someone else can offer some other ideas as to what it might be. Definitely mention this to your doctor though. If it's neuropathy, the pain can be treated with meds.

    Take care

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    Hi Kathyf1:
    I agree with Hippimom2, perhaps you should ask your doctor about peripheal neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a term used to describe disorders of your peripheral nervous system. Your peripheral nervous system includes nerves in your face, arms, legs, torso, and some nerves in your skull. In fact, all of your nerves not located in your central nervous system which includes the brain and the spinal cord are peripheral nerves.

    Neuropathies may affect just one nerve (mononeuropathy) or several nerves (polyneuropathy). Your nerves provide communication between your brain and your muscles, skin, internal organs and blood vessels. When damaged, your nerves can't communicate properly, and that miscommunication causes symptoms such as pain, burning or numbness. Peripheral neuropathy often affects people with diabetes and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. Treating the underlying condition may relieve some cases of peripheral neuropathy. In other cases, treatment of peripheral neuropathy may focus on managing pain. Peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate themselves, and new treatments for peripheral neuropathy using nerve growth factors or gene therapy may offer even better chances for recovery in the future.
    Neurological symptoms may occur related to your central nervous system, which consists of your brain and spinal cord, or your peripheral nervous system, which links your spinal cord and brain to all other parts of your body. The extensive network of peripheral nerves includes the motor nerves, which help your muscles contract, and the sensory nerves, which allow you to feel a range of sensations. In addition, your peripheral nerves help control some of the involuntary functions of the autonomic nervous system, which regulates your internal organs, sweat glands and blood pressure.

    Unfortunately, peripheral nerves are fragile and easily damaged. Damage to a peripheral nerve can interfere with the communication between the area it serves and your brain, affecting your ability to move certain muscles or feel normal sensations. Your symptoms will depend on the cause of your neuropathy and on which nerve or nerves are involved.

    If a sensory nerve is damaged, you're likely to experience symptoms that may include:
    Pain
    Numbness
    Tingling
    Muscle weakness
    Burning
    Loss of feeling

    Talk to your doctor if any of the below occurs:
    If you have a cut or sore on your foot that doesn't seem to be healing, is infected or is getting worse, see your doctor promptly, especially if you have diabetes. Even minor sores that don't heal can turn into ulcers. In the most severe cases, untreated foot ulcers may become gangrenous a condition in which the tissue dies and require surgery or even amputation of your foot. Seek medical care right away if you notice any unusual tingling, weakness or pain in your hands or feet.
    Early diagnosis and treatment offers the best chance for controlling your symptoms and preventing further damage to your peripheral nerves. If your symptoms are interfering with your sleep or you feel depressed, your doctor or pain specialist may be able to suggest treatments that can help.

    I hope this has been helpful to you.
    Best of Luck
    Saysusie

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    Default Re: Burning sensation

    My doctor (my gp) have decided that this is neuropathy, but are unsure if it is related to lupus. More importantly, I have epilepsy and am already taking dialantin. Evidently the drug of choice for neuropathy is neuronton and you annot take dilantin and neuronton at the same time. Also, neuronton is not as good at controlling seizures - Any comments about this medecine conflict? Since seizures sometimes occur with lupus , has anyone else run into this situation and, if so, how did you handle it?


    kathyf


    Quote Originally Posted by kathyf1
    I have SLE. Lately, in the last 4 years, I have been experiencing a lot of burning in my legs. This has crept up to my stomach. It is largely set off by being 'too hot' but I find it happens at other times too.

    Also, sometimes I am having a LOT of trouble sleeping.

    Do either of these things sound like lupus problems?
    kathyf

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    Default Re: Burning sensation

    Hello Kathy I am new here and saw this post. I have CIDP (Chronic Immune Demylenating Polyneuropathy) in addition to Lupus. I just wanted to mention that there is a newer drug other then Neurontin/Gabapentin that they are prescribing for Neuropathy called Lyrica http://www.lyrica.com which may be something you want to ask about. I have great luck with Neurontin personally but I thought if you didn't know about Lyrica you could ask if it has the same interactions. Good luck.

    Jerimy Schilz

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    Default Re: Burning sensation

    Quote Originally Posted by kathyf1
    I have SLE. Lately, in the last 4 years, I have been experiencing a lot of burning in my legs. This has crept up to my stomach. It is largely set off by being 'too hot' but I find it happens at other times too.

    Also, sometimes I am having a LOT of trouble sleeping.

    Do either of these things sound like lupus problems?
    Kathy-

    Has your doctor ruled out neuropothy? I have this condition as a result of my SLE. I have antibodies attacking my neural fibers to my legs and feet which now affects my hands. The sensation varies from burning sensations to "pins and needles". Ask your doctor about this. Best of luck, keep smiling
    Dennis Turkish

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