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Thread: How did you know when you had to stop working and go on disability?

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    Default How did you know when you had to stop working and go on disability?

    Well I am having a rough time imagining functioning like this for much longer in my work. I went back yesterday after sleeping most of 5 days. Last night I had chills and sweats all night long. I feel Hung over. Ugh!

    How do you know when it's time to hang it up? I have to drive for about 5 hrs total today and see 3 severely mentally ill folks who are in rough situations. I'm running on empty already.

    I should probably take another week off but my clients are then left uncovered due to low staff issues.

    Please will you tell me when you knew it was time for you? Thanks so much.

    Tammy

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    for me, as each type of job got too hard, i found another easier, less paid one.
    when i found i was driving dangerously, brain cognative problems, i gave up working.
    by then i had several other health related issues, it was easy to go onto disability pension.

    i was working as a fitter in the mines when diagnosed.
    left that and worked in a supermarket.
    left that and worked as a truck / courier driver.

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    You and I just had this talk in chat and the basic thing I said is that, when the time comes, you either make the decision or the disease makes it for you. Steve's posts basically said the same thing. For me it was a major seizure in the office and us figuring out that my memory could put my company in danger. It isn't easy. We think about the money and the insurance and all the "I can't" but there hits a point that continuing to work isn't really an option. My good days now are not good enough for me to work like I did and we won't even discuss bad days!

    It takes a long time but I have found that mmost of the time when you start asking that question the time has come
    Mari

    Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.

    ~Winston Churchill~







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    Great question! I think many of us struggle with this issue.

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    rob is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the World
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    I usually spent 2 days of my week out of the office and at the test fire range doing accuracy/proof testing on the rifles I used to manufacture. One day I touched off a .50 cal without having put in my earplugs and the earmuff hearing protectors I wore over the plugs for added protection. I just about blew my eardrums out. Two days later, I came back to the shop and was locking up the weapons we tested that day only to find that I left a live round in the chamber of one of them. In decades of handling firearms, I had never done this, not even once.

    The first screw up was bad (if only for me). But the second screw up was something I would fire any employee for on the spot. When I became a safety hazard to others, I knew it was time to pack it in.

    It wasn't the physical symptoms that ended my career, it was brainfog. There were many more smaller incidents that lead up to this, but the safety violations were the proverbial straw.

    Rob
    Last edited by rob; 06-28-2011 at 12:18 PM.

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    This is a great post. I too am thinking the same thing. Tammy I know exactly how you are feeling, I just told my coworkers I feel hungover today. I'm mentally and physically exhausted. Like you I think about my underpriviledged clients also. I also know that I can't make it on the 50% paycut I would take on dissability. Especially now that my husband lost his job and is unable to collect unemployement. This entire situation sucks for all of us!

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    I am in tears as I read these replies. I am also home waiting for my rheumy to call. The chills, brain fog and two naps in before its even noon here, makes it impossible to get behind the wheel. It's 80 here and I have a sweater on. I have fallen asleep behind the wheel about 8 times in the past 2 months. I know that sounds horrible as I could harm others, but I desperately need the money as I am alone. I appreciate your honesty and forthright words.

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    Oh, lovedbyHim, I wish there were a way to make this better for you. Is the drive to and from work the problem, or is it driving to see clients that gets you? If you can get to work safely, and handle a desk job, your employer should accommodate you. Unless it's a very small company, they have to, if you have documentation from your doctor. You probably have your health insurance through work, too...

    There are healthcare jobs that you can do from home. I subscribe to flexjobs.com and they send me almost daily updates of jobs that are either part time or allow you to telecommute. A few of them are for people with degrees/experience in counseling and mental health. I am stuck because it's been so long since I worked that I essentially have no experience, but you should be golden. More and more insurance companies are hiring health coaches to work from home and they seem to be more interested in experience in counseling than in a nursing degree.

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    Tammy i admire alot of member's on the site still trying their hardest to work besides the affects off Lupus but you'll know when you can't carry on no more whatever age you are because Lupus makes you completley worn out and just to move is to much.

    I am sorry mate for how you've been lately, you need some good rest.

    All my love Terry xxx

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    rob is offline Super Moderator Super ModeratorEmperor of the World
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovedbyHim View Post
    I am in tears as I read these replies. I am also home waiting for my rheumy to call. The chills, brain fog and two naps in before its even noon here, makes it impossible to get behind the wheel. It's 80 here and I have a sweater on. I have fallen asleep behind the wheel about 8 times in the past 2 months. I know that sounds horrible as I could harm others, but I desperately need the money as I am alone. I appreciate your honesty and forthright words.
    Really, looking back, I feel somewhat fortunate that things happened the way they did. The consequences of accidentally putting an armor-piercing incendiary .50 cal round through the roof of my factory could have been bad, really bad. The thing would have come down somewhere, and in the middle of the city, it would have hit someone, or something. These things are designed to penetrate a hardened target and then explode once inside. A 25 dollar bullet can disable or even destroy a multi-million dollar enemy fighter plane or SCUD missile before it even gets off the ground. That's good medicine if you're SCUD hunting in Southern Iraq circa 1990-91. Not so good if you're in the Phoenix suburbs circa 2004.

    My mistake made my decision to pack it in much easier. I made the decision to quit with no doubt or question that it was not the right one. I still do not doubt my decision one bit, even seven years down the road. I really hated it, but it had to be done.

    Just be honest and realistic with yourself Tammy. The right choice will come.

    Rob
    Last edited by rob; 06-28-2011 at 11:28 AM.

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