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mystiejm
04-27-2011, 08:30 PM
I have had pain in my cheeks for over a year now. It is right above my molar teeth deep in the tissue. My pcp and Neuro thought it was sjorgens and it might be the beginning of it but I don't have excessive dry mouth and eyes, just a little. It feels like a deep ache and sometimes the muscles will shake a little if I have been laughing a lot. I do think it had something to do with my saliva because when I am thirsty it hurts a lot. I am surprised by how much the pain affects my every day life. I had a CT scan of my sinuses and that was fine(to check for sinus disease).

Does anyone else get this type of pain? For those with sjorgens does this sound familiar?

Thanks, Mary

Twinmama
04-28-2011, 02:16 PM
Hi Mary,
I have a facial pain all the time. but it's not only in cheeks. so I don't know if it's the same or not. and I don't have sjorgens. I have the jaw pain, forhead, cheeks, around eyes etc.
I have these pains every day. I don't know what it is, but if the doctor isn't concerned, I'm not either. I just take it as part of my Lupus pains.
let me know if you get any answers from any doctors!
good luck

Peridot20_Gem
04-29-2011, 02:33 AM
Hi Mary,

I have Sjogren's Disease and at the moment it's working rapid with Lupus also. Sjogren's is terrible for pain in the face and messing with your sinus's also, i'm like a dog constantley runny nose plus i also have TMJ Disease of the Jaw which does'nt help none of it.

If you ever feel paralasis like as if you've had a stroke, it does that to your face it intefers with the muscles and in time works slowly through the body causing this feeling and it tightens the muscles of the face so if you smile it can start to hurt, it makes your saliva dry up and also down your Gullet and can cause severe pain when trying to swallow. I live on cups of tea every 10mins and my food as had to be rejuiced down because of how it hurts. Your muscles are not shaking as you think they're actually twitching but it's a severe twitching which come intolerable.

If it's right above your molar teeth i do suggest you ask to be sent to ENT and they x-ray your jaw to see if you have TMJ Disease also and get them to test you for sjogren's to put your mind at rest properly.

~Hugs Terri~ xxx

Peridot20_Gem
04-29-2011, 03:16 AM
Mary i've added some info for you on the symptoms of sjogren's Disease.

Symptoms of Sjogren's syndrome
The most commonly reported symptoms of Sjogren's syndrome are a dry mouth and dry eyes, both of which can lead to other associated symptoms (see below).

Many women also experience dryness of the vagina, which can make sexual intercourse painful.

Associated symptoms of dry mouth
Associated symptoms of dry mouth include:

•tooth decay, leading to an increased risk of tooth loss
•dry cough
•difficulty swallowing and chewing
•hoarse voice
•difficulty speaking
•swollen salivary glands (located between your jaw and your ears)
•repeated fungal infections of your mouth (oral thrush), symptoms of which include the appearance of white, cream-coloured or yellow spots on the inside of your mouth and tongue
Associated symptoms of dry eyes
Associated symptoms of dry eyes include:

•a burning or stinging sensation in your eyes
•itchy eyes
•a feeling that there is a piece of sand or gravel in your eyes
•irritated and swollen eyelids
•sensitivity to light (photophobia)
•tired eyes
•a discharge of mucus from your eyes
Symptoms can become worse when you are in a windy or smoky environment. Air-conditioned buildings and travelling on aeroplanes can also make symptoms worse.

Other symptoms of Sjogren's syndrome
In more serious cases of Sjogren's syndrome, the immune system can attack other parts of the body as well as the tear, saliva and vaginal glands, causing a wide range of symptoms such as:

•dry skin
•fatigue
•muscle pain
•joint pain, stiffness and swelling
•pain and numbness in certain parts of the body, usually the arms or legs (periphery neuropathy)
•restricted blood flow to the hands, which can cause the hands to feel cold, numb and painful (Raynaud's phenomenon)
•vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels)

mrstjscott
05-10-2011, 10:06 AM
Wow. You just answered a question for me, too. My left jaw frequently feels as if it is locking. It hurts if I laugh to hard or long. Sometimes, in fact, most times, it just happens for no apparent reason. Yes I have been diagnosed with Sjogren's disease but really didn't know what it was except for the dry mouth and eyes.

lizbond36
05-10-2011, 10:32 AM
how do you get tested for Sjogren's disease? I have few of what you listed. But I heard Lupus and this goes hand to hand. Do you have a feeling of bugs crawling on your face, arms and legs? Its mostly on my face Just wondering.
Hugs
Liz

Peridot20_Gem
05-10-2011, 11:59 AM
Wow. You just answered a question for me, too. My left jaw frequently feels as if it is locking. It hurts if I laugh to hard or long. Sometimes, in fact, most times, it just happens for no apparent reason. Yes I have been diagnosed with Sjogren's disease but really didn't know what it was except for the dry mouth and eyes.Hi mrsjscott,

I think you've got TMJ Disease and it can actually give you a locked jaw if it gets to bad and laughing from it makes you ache, so see your GP about sending you to ENT to be checked out and mention to them you have Lupus because it can cause this symptom.

I'll add info about it below for you to read about it.

~Hugs Terri~ xxx

Peridot20_Gem
05-10-2011, 12:02 PM
Temporomandibular Joint Disorder - TMJ Disease

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the area directly in front of the ear on either side of the head where the upper jaw (maxilla) and lower jaw (mandible) meet. Within the TMJ, there are moving parts that allow the upper jaw to close on the lower jaw. This joint is a typical sliding "ball and socket" that has a disc sandwiched between it. The TMJ is used throughout the day to move the jaw, especially in biting and chewing, talking, and yawning. It is one of the most frequently used joints of the body.

The temporomandibular joints are complex and are composed of muscles, tendons, and bones. Each component contributes to the smooth operation of the TMJ. When the muscles are relaxed and balanced and both jaw joints open and close comfortably, we are able to talk, chew, or yawn without pain.

We can locate the TMJ by putting a finger on the triangular structure in front of the ear. The finger is moved just slightly forward and pressed firmly while opening the jaw. The motion felt is from the TMJ. We can also feel the joint motion if we put a little finger against the inside front part of the ear canal. These maneuvers can cause considerable discomfort to a person who is experiencing TMJ difficulty, and doctors use them for making the diagnosis.


What are TMJ disorders, and how are TMJ disorders caused?

TMJ disorders are a group of complex problems of the jaw joint. TMJ disorders are also sometimes referred to as myofacial pain dysfunction and Costen's syndrome. Because muscles and joints work together, a problem with either one can lead to stiffness, headaches, ear pain, bite problems (malocclusion), clicking sounds, or locked jaws. The following are behaviors or conditions that can lead to TMJ disorders.

1.Teeth grinding and teeth clenching (bruxism) increase the wear on the cartilage lining of the TMJ. Those who grind or clench their teeth may be unaware of this behavior unless they are told by someone observing this pattern while sleeping or by a dental professional noticing telltale signs of wear and tear on the teeth. Many patients awaken in the morning with jaw or ear pain.



2.Habitual gum chewing or fingernail biting



3.Dental problems and misalignment of the teeth (malocclusion). Patients may complain that it is difficult to find a comfortable bite or that the way their teeth fit together has changed. Chewing on only one side of the jaw can lead to or be a result of TMJ problems.



4.Trauma to the jaws: Previous fractures in the jaw or facial bones can lead to TMJ disorders.



5.Stress frequently leads to unreleased nervous energy. It is very common for people under stress to release this nervous energy by either consciously or unconsciously grinding and clenching their teeth.



6.Occupational tasks such as holding the telephone between the head and shoulder may contribute to TMJ disorders.

Peridot20_Gem
05-10-2011, 12:06 PM
how do you get tested for Sjogren's disease? I have few of what you listed. But I heard Lupus and this goes hand to hand. Do you have a feeling of bugs crawling on your face, arms and legs? Its mostly on my face Just wondering.
Hugs
LizHi Liz,

Lupus and sjogren's disease don't go hand in hand mate, they're totally different A1 Diseases.

You need to ask your rheumo specialist when talking to test you for it, he may have done already and if the reading as come back negative he may have taken it as that, when it could be a false reading through how the bloods fluctuate and tell him what your suffering.

When i saw the blood specialist last time he said your sjogren's is working like made in your system and you've also got the Lupus fighting at it, they're totally seperate mate.

Terri x