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ruziska
03-29-2011, 08:26 PM
Is lupus hereditary? I have 2 kids- a 22 yr old son and 18 yr old daughter. Is this something that can be passed down to them? I don't know if anyone else in my family has lupus or not and health histories are not something they like to or willing to discuss. My daughter especially is concerned and I don't know what to tell her. Thanks for your help.

magistramarla
03-29-2011, 09:09 PM
Ruziska,
Most docs and most of the info about AI diseases will tell you that they aren't hereditary, or that too little is known. However, there are studies being done to look for genetic markers.

Many of us here at WHL have discussed this, and I'm sure that you can find some old threads that relate. I know that I watched my mother and my aunt go through many of the symptoms that I now have. My mother went from doc to doc, asking about arthritis, but was told that she didn't have arthritis until eventually the bones in her knees literally disintegrated. She was sensitive to the sun, had strange rashes, migraines and eventually dementia, but nothing was ever diagnosed.

My aunt was diagnosed with RA, but her rashes, voice problems and swelling toes and feet were never addressed. She also developed dementia and her muscles all over her body stiffened. One of their brothers had Parkinson's, too. The generation before them all complained of the "family curse" of what they called arthritis.

After a lot of hassles, I was dx'd with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease - an overlap of Lupus, RA, Sjogren's, and Psoriatic Arthritis, with Spasmodic Dysphonia (voice problems), Meniere's (inner ear disorder) and Raynaud's (toes swell). I'm sure that I have what they had, but I know the proper names for it.

There was a great thread over on the Sjogren's site calling it "The Viking Warrior's Disease". Some researcher in Europe had postulated that the genetic markers for Sjogren's may have been spread around northern Europe by the Vikings. Interesting to me, since my mother's side of the family that had "the family curse" came from Scotland, a place that was visited by those pesky Vikings!

I don't want to scare you and your daughter, but I think that this is worth being aware of and that our kids should know about it and should alert their docs when they have symptoms. I have four daughters. One has Poly-cystic Ovarian Syndrome, one has IBS, and another has had problems with endometriosis. All of these things are suspected of being autoimmune responses. The oldest girl and my son are disgustingly healthy, so far.

I know that we have other members who have seen similar things in their families. Hopefully, some of them will post here.
Don't freak your kids out, but keep an eye on them.
Hugs,
Marla

tgal
03-29-2011, 09:51 PM
The most popular belief at this time is that yes, people with autoimmune issues are born with whatever it is that makes us have autoimmune issues, however they believe that there is some form of "trigger" that actually turns it on. It is believed that the "trigger" could be a virus, chemicals, or a myriad of other things not yet known. Marla is completely correct in saying that your children should be aware but they don't have to live in fear. I would just say that they need to keep an eye out for

My 15 year old is being watched by a youth rheumy because she has been having problems with her knees since she was 6 (before I actually got sick) and because, although no one besides me has Lupus, other members of my family have AI diseases such as RA so they already knew that she has it in her family. I guess that means yes and no LOL Not much help eh?

Toradoradi
03-29-2011, 10:41 PM
My family has quite a few AI diseases in it actually. I am now finding out. 3 of my sisters have cealiacs disease, one other sister has autoimmune disorder? Deficiency?? Something weird. My mom and grandma both have/had arthritis, my grandma had alztiemzers as well, one of my other sisters has fibromyalgia and my grandpa has parkinsens. I've read places that AI diseases tend to run in packs or something. That if someone in your family has one your more likely to get some form of AI disease whether it be the same one as them or not. That's just what I read somewhere though, couldn't tell you if it was actually true but it seems in my case it could be given my family history.

steve.b
03-30-2011, 05:00 AM
i too have a family history of ai issues.
i am the unlucky one with lupus, fibro and a few others. but my father and 2 sisters have other issues.

i also believe that there is a hereditary component, but you need a trigger to activate that gene.

your children may never be effected, or they may be.

there is quite a few studies going on at the present.
the lupus foundation of america send me emails of clinical trials. i remember there being studies of families, they may be able to help.

rob
03-30-2011, 06:25 AM
My personal opinion is that there is indeed a genetic factor involved in SLE. My mother has SLE, and I have SLE. I you look at the number of people in the U.S. diagnosed with SLE, and compare that number to the overall number of people in the U.S., it makes the chances of two people in the same family having SLE very, very small. Not very scientific, I know, but to me it's no coincidence that my mother and I both have Lupus. I do believe that a genetic predisposition to possibly develop an autoimmune disorder was passed on to me. With this predisposition, I then encountered some yet to be identified trigger in my environment, and bingo, I developed SLE and then MS-both autoimmune disorders.

Rob

Peridot20_Gem
03-30-2011, 08:04 AM
Hi Ruziska,

When i was diagnosed with Raynauds 3yrs ago they said i had psoriasis and the blood test came back inheredity and that would have been my dad, then i was passed onto a rheumo specialist who did loads of bloods on me and also him wanting to know my medical history from what i suffered from 18yrs old till now, he told me me i was born with it and when i said where's it come from he told me through your parent's genes related and i've had loads of symtoms and i can recall my dad having simular things himself but being an older person no notice would have been taken like things are today.

It's up to you if you want to tell your children but it's nothing serious to worry about and it's best you ask if your children's bloods can be tested to put your mind at more ease.

~Hugs Terri~ xxx

SandyR
03-30-2011, 10:08 AM
I have a family AI link that is easy to see too. I have an AI disease. I suspect my mother of having an AI disease as well based on her known medical history, most likely the one her sickest sister has. Many of her other sisters (she has 7) also have other AI issues but are less severe. The doctors all tell me there is not link but what do they know - they aren't the ones who have an AI or a family history of it.

rob
03-30-2011, 10:22 AM
The doctors all tell me there is not link but what do they know - they aren't the ones who have an AI or a family history of it.

And, most doctors are not Geneticists anyway, nor do they have any training that regular MD's can get from a Geneticist in this specialized field.

SandyR
03-30-2011, 10:25 AM
exactly. But don't tell them that - they think they are all God's greatest gift to the masses.

rob
03-30-2011, 10:36 AM
exactly. But don't tell them that - they think they are all God's greatest gift to the masses.

They can't be, because as everybody knows, I'm God's greatest gift to the masses! (insert sarcastic silly smiley face)

tgal
03-30-2011, 10:40 AM
They can't be, because as everybody knows, I'm God's greatest gift to the masses! (insert sarcastic silly smiley face)

This made me spit my drink out! Too funny!

mountaindreamer
03-30-2011, 10:56 AM
i have tried to respond 4 times, and post keeps disappearing.)

i have 3 grown children, and i have told each of them to inform their drs., and to keep a watch on ANA counts.

sorry for the brief response, but i promise that i have typed it 5 times now, and each time got a little shorter.. yuk yuk yuk


rob and sandy....thanks for the morning laugh.

SandyR
03-30-2011, 11:07 AM
They can't be, because as everybody knows, I'm God's greatest gift to the masses! (insert sarcastic silly smiley face)

We're not worthy! We're not worthy! LOL!

steve.b
03-30-2011, 07:05 PM
no matter how i try.........
r. o. b.
g. o. d.

they are on different places on the key board.

sorry :P

ruziska
03-31-2011, 08:25 PM
Thank yo all for your responses. When we thought it was RA, the rheumy said that my daughter would have a good chance of developing it and my son was "predisposed" to fibromyalgia. Will ask new rheumy his opinion.

kim,l
03-31-2011, 08:32 PM
yes in my case it was heriditary i got it from my mother and i have my children take regular tests so if they have it it can be caught early even though my eldest daughter has tested negative i still believe she has it all the signs are there for lupus but doctors are hard to convince my mother also has rheumitoid arthritis and osti arthritis

Nonna
04-01-2011, 02:35 AM
I'm the first in my family. No one else has it. Hereditary? I don't know, but I firmly believe that tendencies toward diseases are inherited.

Oh gracious Rob, Sandy is right we are not worthy of your presence. Share with us your wisdom oh great one......
TeeeHeeeee LOL

rob
04-01-2011, 02:50 AM
I'm the first in my family. No one else has it. Hereditary? I don't know, but I firmly believe that tendencies toward diseases are inherited.

Oh gracious Rob, Sandy is right we are not worthy of your presence. Share with us your wisdom oh great one......
TeeeHeeeee LOL

Too funny! Now I can't get that movie Wayne's World out of my head.

The question of Lupus having a hereditary component or not is a subject that I've done a bit of reading about over the years. Although I suspect there is a genetic link, there isn't any proof at this point. I've always thought that if a genetic link could actually be discovered, it could possibly point researchers towards a cure, or at least get them closer to one. Wishful thinking I suppose. Maybe someday.

Rob

ritzbit
04-01-2011, 07:02 AM
Like Nonna I am the first in my family. I think for many people who already have several family members with AI diseases there is a high likelihood that there is a genetic link. For now I would just tell your kids to watch for the signs and to get looked at if they feel like something is wrong; don't worry if you don't have to.

tgal
04-01-2011, 07:12 AM
Thank yo all for your responses. When we thought it was RA, the rheumy said that my daughter would have a good chance of developing it and my son was "predisposed" to fibromyalgia. Will ask new rheumy his opinion.

I am confused by this because most data and both rhuemys I have visted din't care what autoimmune disease was in my family any one of them left me open to any of them. For example, my grandmother had RA which means that autoimmune is in my family. Knowing that means that I am "predisposed" to autoimmune but it may not be RA. For me it showed up as Lupus, Fibro, raynaud's, IBS, vasculitis to name a few. I don't have RA but I do have a family history of autoimmune issues which means that my daughter has a higher change of getting one of the autoimmune things. autoimmune is like the big umbrella with all different things below and we know she is predisposed to autoimmune but we don't know 1) if she will get thetrigger that starts her down the path or 2) which firm of autoimmune she will get if she does.

Peridot20_Gem
04-01-2011, 07:17 AM
They can't be, because as everybody knows, I'm God's greatest gift to the masses! (insert sarcastic silly smiley face)Rob brilliant mate that as made me laugh.

Peridot20_Gem
04-01-2011, 07:22 AM
yes in my case it was heriditary i got it from my mother and i have my children take regular tests so if they have it it can be caught early even though my eldest daughter has tested negative i still believe she has it all the signs are there for lupus but doctors are hard to convince my mother also has rheumitoid arthritis and osti arthritisKim, good point there mate because my dad had spondalitis which i was born with and he had osteoporosis which my other 2 sister's have, his psoriasis i inherited and he had asthma bad and my youngest sister had that from birth and also her son.
My dads no longer here but my god he as alot to answer for ahhhhhhhh

Saysusie
04-02-2011, 12:40 PM
There have been quite a few studies correlating the possibility of Lupus being hereditary or genetic. The following report was published in 2007 and seems to be the consensus:

"Genetic Predisposition:


Lupus is not hereditary in that the disease itself is passed from parent to child. It is hereditary in that a predisposition to developing the disease is passed down from parent to child. It is important to recognize this distinction. Not everyone with a parent who has lupus will develop the disease itself, and children can develop the disease even if neither of their parents has lupus.
Only about 5% of children of people with lupus will develop the disease themselves.


If the genetic predisposition exists in a person, then lupus can be triggered. It is thought that environmental causes like disease, drugs, or viruses can trigger lupus.
Environmental Lupus Triggers:


Infections, especially Epstein-Barr virus
Sulfa and penicillin antibiotics
Ultraviolet light
High levels of stress
Hormones
Medication, especially certain ones for cardiac arrhythmia and hypertension (high blood pressure)

The exact causes of lupus are unknown, but it is expected that genetic[/URL] and environmental factors both play a part. It is thought that there is some hereditary component to the disease as people who have a family history of lupus are more likely to contract the illness. According to the Lupus Site, a guide for patients and their families, there's a 5-12% greater tendency for people to get the disease if family members already have it. This doesn't necessarily mean that if they possess the causative genes they will develop the incurable disease too. It will probably make them more susceptible than the general population if they are exposed to certain triggers in the environment.
s lupus herditary? Lupus is caused by both the environment and genes, meaning that certain environmental triggers will cause the disease to develop in individuals who are genetically pre-disposed to it. The internal environmental causes may include the hormone oestrogen, which would explain why more women are affected by the condition than men. External environmental cues are thought to include ultraviolet light, infections such as the Epstein-Barr virus, stress, smoking, and some medications. Scientists have been looking for the genetic causes of lupus for years, and in early 2008 international teams of researchers published several papers detailing a number of genes[URL="http://www.brighthub.com/science/genetics/articles/33141.aspx"] (http://www.brighthub.com/science/genetics/articles/26129.aspx) which jumpstart the disease. Among them were the genes ITGAM, KIAA1542, PXK and rs10798269. Other genes such as PTPN22 and STAT 4 had previously been identified, and also contribute to other autoimmune diseases. This lends support to the theory that there are common sets of genes involved in autoimmune diseases. Scientists also confirmed more than a dozen other known lupus genes.
To be able to turn this knowledge into useful therapies scientists will now try to find out what these genes do to enable them to design ways of stopping them in their tracks."



I hope that this information has been helpful and answered some of your questions. I wish you the very best :-)

Peace and Blessings
Namaste
Saysusie