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KathyW1958
06-19-2008, 06:39 AM
I was told by my Rheumatologist that I have dishydrotic eczema along with the Lupus. He told me that it is not related to the Lupus, yet when I looked on the internet about this, it clearly states that this type of eczema is caused by an autoimmune disorder and there is not much else about it. Can anyone address this and is there others with this type of eczema on the hands and feet? Any suggestions about this. I went to a dermatologist and he told me that there is no cure. Boggled about this situation big time.

Kathy

Oluwa
06-19-2008, 07:26 AM
Hi Kathy,

I did a google, but I was unable to find the connection between Lupus, autoimmune disease with Dyshidrotic Eczema. All articles I had read said cause is unknown. This is pretty much the standard wording I have come across.

Perhaps it is common in those inflicted with an autoimmune..

I just had a bout of what they described in the links below, little deep balls with a spot in the middle. but I though mine was from contact dermatitis, moth balls as Cheryl had suggested. I dabbed some steroid cream on it..fading now.

I do have common eczema, but I haven't had a bout of that in years...

I thought this info maybe helpful to you...follow the links..

http://health.discovery.com/encyclopedias/illnesses.html?article=99
http://www.emedicine.com/ped/TOPIC1867.HTM

Images.... http://dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/pompholyx.html mine looked like the top middle picture. Who knew....

My bout of eczema I was told years ago was weather activated, though I had the bug in me...left Hawaii and it disappeared. I had a small saucer size patch of on my calf for years while there. I left it, never applied anything to it....

No, eczema cannot be cured, but you can prevent some types of eczema by avoiding irritants, stress and the things you are allergic to...try that..

Hope this helps..hopefully someone can provide better answers for you..

Hugs..be well,
Oluwa

KathyW1958
06-19-2008, 07:43 AM
Hi Aluwa,
I went to the sites and there were the pictures of what happens with my hands and feet. I mean the pictures of the Pompholyx big time. Wow I have never seen the pictures that show exactly what I am dealing with and have dealt with for years. My Rheumatologist put me on 150mg of Imuran for it and it has helped a lot and the outbreaks are not as severe with very few outbreaks on the hands, but I still get it on my feet, especially right before my monthly. I went to a dermatologist once for it and he acted like it was no big deal and just said oh there is no cure and did nothing. Well I am glad that you answered my post as this helps a lot. I won't have to stress over this now. I have a better understanding of it. I can't remember where I read on the net that there could be a cause for this, but that does not matter. I know that the Imuran helps and I was just wondering if others had this problem too as well as having SLE.

God Bless
Kathy

Saysusie
06-19-2008, 09:08 AM
It is a non-contagious skin problem that is thought to be perhaps a reaction to some environmental irritant; it may also be an autoimmune disease. Like Lupus, it is a recurrent, inflammatory, chronic condition. At present, it is incurable.

I found this article by a person who also suffers from dyshidrosis eczema. Here is how he treated it:

I have used strong hydrogen peroxide (aka H2O2), the stuff used to sterilize wounds, plus several types of ointments. I rub the skin with cotton squares soaked in the H2O2 for a few seconds, and dab it dry. The skin will gradually begin to tingle, and it will turn white at the site of the disease. Healthy skin remains as is. A little later I rub an ointment into the skin to help it heal. This treatment gets rid of the vesicles pretty fast. After the skin crusts over, I use a plastic file to slough off the crust, and vegetable oil to keep it moisturized. In my experience, this simple and effective treatment got me from intense itching and blistering due to active disease, to no more itch and drying, healing blisters in just a few days!

You should see the skin on my soles! Smooth as a baby's bottom. But it took real persistence, so it's necessary to keep at it. This disease is very tough. Eventually, new healthy skin will build up, and be resistant to the peroxide -- the skin that still turns white lets you know the extent of the disease since the damaged skin burns and the healthy skin does not.

The one drawback of this treatment is the fact that the skin that the peroxide is working on often itches intensely for an hour after treatment. Taking Benadryl has not been shown to be helpful; I used to tough it out, massaging the foot to help with the itch. But I since learned that dunking the hand or foot in hot water takes care of the problem. (Some people prefer ice water.)

The ointments I've used are as follows:

1) zinc oxide ointment (diaper rash cream) -- I pick the one with no fragrance and the least amount of additives. Eckerds carries one that only has white petrolatum, beeswax and mineral oil in it. The zinc ointment is universally recognized by dyshidrosis sufferers as very helpful.

2) 1% hydrocortisone ointment (over the counter). Ointment is recommended over cream because it is absorbed better, and acts as an emollient. This non-prescription medication can be used for longer periods of time than stronger prescription steroids.

3) Bag balm is a time tested veterinary preparation used for cracked cow udders. I was given some during a troublesome relapse and found it very helpful. It is commonly available on the internet, as well as in some drug stores. The maker calls it an antiseptic protective ointment and lists the following ingredients: petrolatum, lanolin, 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate 0.3% (which is an antibiotic). (WARNING: Some people are sensitive to sulfates or lanolin; if in doubt, do not use it. The treatment described here does not depend on it.)

All the above ointments are petroleum based. If you think this may cause a problem, ask your compounding pharmacy to create them for you using un-petroleum jelly (which is commonly available from health food stores). And non-petroleum diaper rash salves are not that hard to find these days.

Hope this is helpful
Peace and Blessings
Saysusie