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View Full Version : Enough is Enough Already!



mnjodette
10-18-2006, 07:20 AM
Just gotta' vent a little here. Last week I was in the hospital with yet another bout of peridarial effusion and a reaction to some new meds. That was scary, and laid me up most of the week. So, on Monday evening of this week, my weak right leg (I have a peripheral neuropathy, also caused by Lupus) gave out on me as I was going downstairs, and I landed on my fanny at the bottom. My foot's broken and I'm in a cast up to my knee. I can't drive, and I have 4 doctor's appointments in the next two weeks. My husband has to wait on me and act as my driver until I get this cast off. He's just loving this disease :x We could use some prayers, my friends. Patience is wearing a little thin.

MARYCAIN
10-18-2006, 07:39 AM
Sometimes it seems like the hits just keep coming. Can your doctor arrange for a home health aide or personal attendant to help out some? This might also be a good time to call your church and ask for help - I'm sure there are people who would be willing to drive you places to give your husband a break. I will be keeping you in my prayers for a speedy recovery.

mnjodette
10-18-2006, 07:52 AM
Thanks for the suggestions. I know the women in my office are also willing, but it's hard to ask for help. I've never been very good at that. I guess this is the time to learn.

littlered
10-18-2006, 08:56 AM
I have learned that we MUST ask for help. For one thing, there are lots of people in our lives who love us but hesitate to ask to help us because they don't want us feeling like "cripples." I have several friends (husband too) who jump at the chance to take me places. THEY say it blesses THEM to bless ME! So why deny them a blessing? Besides, it's such fun to see them and get to visit...even if it is a doctor errand.
Just a thought. Friends are there for a REASON!

MARYCAIN
10-18-2006, 09:09 AM
I found this article about the importance of nutrition in bone healing - I've had several fractures due to osteoporosis, so I know it's hard to get enough protein and calcium to help with bone healing when you can hardly get around to cook or shop - maybe this information will help.

Not sure if this URL will work as a link, but you can cut and paste it into your address bar on your internet browser.

http://lesann.tripod.com/healing%20fractures.htm

There's also an old folk legend that the sound of a cat purring helps bone fractures to heal - I have no idea if this is true, but if you love cats as I do, who cares, it's a great reason to prop your leg up and pet a cat! That is definitely my idea of good therapy.

lupusgirlstefanie
10-18-2006, 12:28 PM
I know sometimes it seems like when it rains it pours. Take care hon and I'm sending good healing vibes your way.

mnjodette
10-19-2006, 02:20 PM
Thank you all who responded. I have had several emails from work friends today offering to help transport me. It is time I ask for help...I know you're right.

I'm having a DexaScan next week so I'll see if my bones have been compromised by this disease (or the prednisone.) Might be why I suffered a break. I will read the info on bone health - thanks for the link!

I have two cats (the pix on my posts looks just like them..they are sisters.) I love the sound of their purring, and I believe it's healing. When my son and his wife divorced last year, I got 'custody' of my granddaugher's kitties. Now when she visits she gets to see them (her Mom didn't want to keep them and I figured my granddaughter had enough loss to deal with.)

MARYCAIN
10-19-2006, 02:47 PM
Maybe you will be the one to prove the legend of the purring cat is true by healing super quickly.

Prednisone can definitely cause premature osteoporosis - I found this out the hard way with my first fracture. My doctors never mentioned osteoporosis prevention when I started taking prednisone - I'm glad you are having the bone density test, I think they should be standard for everyone on prednisone.

I hope your foot heals quickly.

littlered
10-23-2006, 11:32 AM
MaryCain, I don't know WHY they don't make it protocol to have a red flag osteo alert for anyone taking steroids! I am not lactose intolerant, have always eaten plenty of dairy AND took calcium and D supplements after menopause, yet my hip has the cracks in it. Now I'm doing Fosamax. Kinda tough on me (heartburn, IBS, etc) but better than broken bones!

MARYCAIN
10-23-2006, 11:57 AM
Yes, it does make you wonder - I had almost every risk factor in the book except smoking - small bone structure, no dairy intake, family history, long term steroid use, medical menopause from taking lupron - yet no doctor mentioned it to me - I guess they also though I was too young for it to be a problem. It's still an ongoing problem for me because I still need steroids, I'm not on hormone therapy because of previous strokes, and I can't take fosamax, actonel, boniva etc. because of esophageal problems from the scleroderma, so it's one of those situations where the cure is as bad as the disease. I take monthly parathroid injections now to prevent further bone loss, but if they had been started early on, it would have prevented the bone loss. Having the severe osteoporosis is scary because even a sneeze can cause a fracture, my bones are so brittle. So far I've had multiple vertebral fractures, a massive bone infection that almost killed me, three rib fractures, my left hip has been fractured twice requiring surgery, also my wrist - all because pf osteoporosis. So it's a big issue for me - I nag all ny sisters, nieces and co-workers about bone density testing.

littlered
10-23-2006, 02:16 PM
Oh, MaryCain :( I had no idea your osteo was this advanced. I used to love walking our dogs (and they are angels on the leash) butafter this my husband doesn't want me walking them anymore. He says, "what if something should happen and you fell?"
Well, heck, people can fall down doing ANYthing...my leg is proof of that. How do you get activity/exercise?

MARYCAIN
10-23-2006, 02:52 PM
Very carefully! I have a great physical therapist who works with me. It's the silly things you can't control that seem to be the biggest problem - like sneezing or coughing. What I really miss is being able to rough and tumble with my kids, having grown up with seven older brothers, I'm very much a tomboy who used to play softball and football with my boys and taught them how to skateboard - it's not an option any more. Luckily the brother next to me in age lives close and has all girls, so we "trade" kids a lot - he takes my boys to baseball games and on hunting and fishing trips - I take his girls to the mall and brownies/scouts, so it works out well for us both. One of the blessings of a large family - there is always somebody around to play with, so the boys never feel deprived by my illness. There are new treatments being developed for osteoporosis that don't have the side effects of fosamax, etc., so I'm waiting for those to become available. Hopefully it will be soon.

mnjodette
10-25-2006, 06:51 AM
I had a bone density test yesterday and my bone loss is minimal...thank God! My recent fall down the stairs and subsequent broken foot was probably not a 'fragility fracture' but just a garden variety accident. They are going to do a bit more comparison to an earlier bone density test to be certain. My rheumatologist says that it's 'controversial' to begin someone on a drug like Fosamax without some evidence of bone thinning. But a bone density test each year is justifiable to insurance companies when you have Lupus or are on a steroid. Everyone should press for that! It is critical. My mother in law had very brittle bones from multiple medical issues. She was living with us when she broke her hip. The hip just fractured while she was standing; she went down and laid on the floor of our family room for 8 hours while we were at work. She couldn't reach the phone. Broke my heart.

MARYCAIN
10-25-2006, 07:36 AM
about your bone density test - I'm glad it looks okay. Isn't it frustrating how all the standards of medical care seem to be dictated these days by the insurers rather than the doctors? It looks like they would understand it costs a lot less to prevent osteoporosis than to treat it later.

littlered
10-25-2006, 08:13 AM
MaryCain; it would appear that they apply the same penny-wise pound-foolish kind of thinking to educational spending vs. prison spending. I think many people currently in the justice system wouldn't have ended up there if their educational and emotional needs had been met early on. Yet we spend how much money putting people to death, keeping them on death row until all appeals are gone YEARS), locking them away for life--on our dime...We spend a FRACTION of that money on schools, teachers, materials. It's like nobody can see that an ounce of prevention's worth a pound of cure.
Wow, way off thread here :oops: Not doing too good today. Terrible brain fog and coughing my head off! Sorry!

littlered
10-25-2006, 08:23 AM
MaryCain; it would appear that they apply the same penny-wise pound-foolish kind of thinking to educational spending vs. prison spending. I think many people currently in the justice system wouldn't have ended up there if their educational and emotional needs had been met early on. Yet we spend how much money putting people to death, keeping them on death row until all appeals are gone YEARS), locking them away for life--on our dime...We spend a FRACTION of that money on schools, teachers, materials. It's like nobody can see that an ounce of prevention's worth a pound of cure.
Wow, way off thread here :oops: Not doing too good today. Terrible brain fog and coughing my head off! Sorry!

MARYCAIN
10-25-2006, 09:24 AM
But despite your brain fog you're thinking more clearly than most of our leaders - I agree 100%

Take care of that cough - you don't want to collapse that lung again. Don't forget to use your heart hugger pillow.