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pinkjmf
08-22-2006, 06:51 PM
How long did it take before anyone heard back from S.S. ??????

SoleSinger
08-22-2006, 07:27 PM
I did my application in May, just about three weeks ago I got a packet in the mail that I had to finish and fill out in 15 days and in 60 day I should hear from them to see the dr. after that I am not sure...

MARYCAIN
08-22-2006, 08:25 PM
SOME REGIONS HAVE A LOT LONGER BACKLOG THAN OTHERS. BASED ON WHAT I SEE IN MY JOB, 3-6 MONTHS IS ABOUT AVERAGE, BUT IT CAN TAKE A LOT LONGER TO GET A DECISION, DEPENDING ON WHETHER YOU HAVE TO GET AN IME (INDEPENDENT MEDICAL EXAMINATION). IF YOUR INITIAL APPLICATION WAS PRETTY THOROUGH AND YOU SUBMITTED MEDICAL RECORDS WITH IT, SS CAN MAKE A DECISION BAED ON THAT ALONE, ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE A QUALIFYING DISORDER.

MANY PEOPLE ARE TURNED DOWN THE FIRST TIME THEY APPLY, SO DON'T BE TOO SURPRISED IF THIS HAPPENS - JUST BE SURE TO FILE AN APPEAL. YOU DON'T HAVE TO HAVE AN ATTORNEY AT THE APPEAL STAGE, BUT MOST PEOPLE DON'T FEEL COMFORTABLE REPRESENTING THEMSELVES. IF YOU DO GET AN ATTORNEY, MAKE SURE IT IS SOMEONE WHO DOES A LOT OF DISABILITY WORK, AND BE VERY SURE YOU UNDERSTAND THE FEE ARRANGEMENT UP FRONT. MOST SS ATTORNEYS WORK ON CONTINGENCY, MEANING THEY ARE PAID ONLY IF YOU WIN, BUT YOU MAY STILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYING ANY EXPENSES AND COURT FEES. STAY AWAY FROM ANY LAWYER WHO IS UNWILLING TO PUT HIS FEE ARRANGEMENT IN WRITING.

BE AWARE THAT EVEN IF YOU DO GET APPROVED ON YOUR FIRST TRY, THERE IS A 5 MONTH "GAP" AFTER YOUR DATE OF DISABILITY BEFORE YOU CAN RECEIVE SSD BENEFITS. SO IF YOUR DATE OF DISABILITY WAS DETERMINED TO BE AUGUST 1, FOR INSTANCE, YOUR BENEFITS WOULDN'T BEGIN UNTIL FIVE MONTHS LATER. YOU DO NOT RECEIVE ANY BENEFITS FOR THAT FIVE MONTH PERIOD, SO IT DOESN'T COUNT TOWARD YOUR 24-MONTH PERIOD BEFORE YOU BECOME ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICARE.

IF YOU MEET THE INCOME GUIDELINES, YOU CAN APPLY FOR SSI AS WELL, THE ADVANTAGE TO THAT IS YOU START GETTING BENEFITS MUCH FASTER AND YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID. DIFFERENT STATES HAVE DIFFERENT GUIDELINES, BUT THE SSA WEBSITE SHOULD HAVE LINKS TO EACH STATE.

THIS IS PROBABLY WAY MORE THAN YOU WANTED TO KNOW, BUT I HOPE IT HELPS.

pinkjmf
08-23-2006, 08:18 AM
I couldn't believe it someone from the SS office called yesterday to set up a phone interview for today. The lady was so nice and she said that I didn't qualify for SS benefits because I didn't have a long work history but she said that she was going to try to get me SSI benefits. She called this morning asked me some questions and told me that she is going to turn it all in and I would be getting something in the mail stating approval or not.
I filled out the paper work online. It took 3 hours to finish everything they needed. I really didn't think that they would have even got to my paperwork so soon. Maybe this is a good sign.

MARYCAIN
08-23-2006, 08:34 AM
SSI doesn't take nearly as long to process and there isn't a benefits gap, plus you may be eligible for medicaid, The income guidelines are pretty strict - in Kentucky, it's $2,000 in total assets not counting your house - I didn't qualify because I have a burial insurance policy for $5,000, even though my monthly medical bills and meds are about 75% of my income. I wish you good luck with this, Hope you get a yes answer soon.

SoleSinger
08-23-2006, 08:41 AM
WHAT??? Jessica, you're on the but you don't look sick board, right? Ask Carolyn about that... What about people who are born not able to work? They can get disability... That makes no sense to me...

MARYCAIN
08-23-2006, 09:08 AM
SSD (Social Security Disability) is for people who have paid into the Social Security system for a period of time, and then become disabled. To qualify for SSD, you have to have worked and paid into the system for so many quarters - I think now it's 15 of the last 18, but
I'm not sure. SSD is based on the average amount you earned while working.

SSI (Supplemental Security Income) is a different program and doesn't require you to have ever worked. Even children can receive SSI, as it is income/disability based. It's possible to draw SSD and SSI boyh, and people who haven't worked to qualify for SSD can often qualify for SSI because it is based on state requirements instead of federal.

If Jessica hasn't worked for a long enough period, then she would not be able to apply for SSD, only SSI. People who don't qualify for SSD may still be eligible for services such as vocational rehabiltation and job placement.

Hope this helps.

pinkjmf
08-23-2006, 10:26 AM
Is life insurance and burial funds the same thing ???? I'm confused ????? Is it anything that can be cashed in as money, I didn't think that would be life insurance, you really couldn't cash that in ?? Can you ??? This is all too confusing to me.

MARYCAIN
08-23-2006, 11:33 AM
But certain kinds of life insurance policies, called whole life policies, accumulate cash value the longer you have them. If you have enough cash value, you can borrow against it, or cash it in. So for income guideline purposes it's considered an asset if you have cash value accumulated.

Term life insurance is a policy that you buy for a set amount of coverage (the face amount of the policy) for a certain period of time (the term). It doesn't increase in value. If you die during the period of coverage, the policy pays only the face amount, regardless of what you have paid in premiums. If you cash it in before the term ends, you may not get back all the premiums you paid - it just depends on the partiular policy.

"Burial funds" for income guideline purposes can be several different things- a Certificate of Deposit payable on death, a pre-paid funeral plan, or a burial insurance policy (where the proceeds are paid directly to a funeral home you designate) are all considered burial funds. Different states have different guidelines for the amount of burial funds you can exempt. "Exempt" means you don't have to declare it as income, so it doesn't count against your eligibility for assistance programs. Apparently the government hasn't priced funerals lately, because most states only allow you to exempt about $2,000.

Hope this explains it a little better.

pinkjmf
08-23-2006, 03:49 PM
Thanks, that helps alot.