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View Full Version : Medicine as a career path?



aimee.x
04-21-2012, 04:24 AM
So for a long time (before I discovered I had lupus) I've been wanting to pursue a career in medicine/medical sciences. However recently I've been wondering if that really is the right course/career path for me because I hear that medicine is a really challenging and pressuring course that really takes a massive amount of effort and is extremely tiring. I also heard that most people with lupus have a slightly suppressed immunity which makes it easier for them to pick up infections and I was wondering if following in the medicine path would be bad for me as a result of that...Any ideas? Thanks

steve.b
04-21-2012, 07:41 AM
hi aimee.
i do not have a medical background.
what i am going to say is my uinderstanding.....
but please read more before believing just my word.

i believe that lupus patients do not have a suppressed immunity system.
they actually have a very overactive system.
it is too active, and it is attacking our good parts as well as the bad.
we then take drugs to try to suppress it....
in order to slow down the attacking.

we do have other members who are undertaking studies in medicine.
they are not doing it easy.......
but they are succeeding.

one of my aunties is a registered nurse.
she runs the emergency ward at a busy hospital.....
and she has had lupus for many, many years.
again she has her challenges....
but even with lupus, she is healthy enough to do her job very well.

if you are unwell for a period of time....
are you able to place your studies on hold.
and end up taking longer to complete them.

do you want to continue in this field.....
knowing it will be mentally draining....
therefore causing extra pressure on your body.

only you can answer these questions.
your lupus should not be a barrier...
it just may cause a few detours along the way.

please go to my profile page... and read a little about me.
i am happy for you to send me a personal message if you want to discuss this more.

Bekah
04-21-2012, 08:03 AM
Hi Aimee!

I am very new at all of this but wanted to let you know that my GP has many auto-immune disorders and is very successful in his career. Now, I do not know the timing of symptoms versus when he was in med school either. He is however an inspiration managing a career, a young family and at least psoriatic arthritis involving his entire spine. (He has indicated he has more auto-immune diseases but has not talked specifically about them to me)

I am a firm believer that we can do whatever we set our minds to. There are always going to be road bumps in life. The key is to strap yourself in and adapt to the roller coaster. (In my humble opinion)

So, if it is your dream to become a medical professional go for it! You will not be satisfied otherwise. If you try and fail; at least you know you tried and you can adapt your life to the next adventure!

ritzbit2
04-21-2012, 07:04 PM
I am pre med and all I can say is it is really really hard. I have to work really hard to just keep up with the material, and when I'm sick and have to miss it makes me stress out more than I already am because I feel like I'm really falling behind. My grades are not as good as they could be but I feel like I am still doing well. I work with disabiltiy services at my school and right now I'm trying to get my course load reduced so I can still be considered a full time student but with less classes. I think if it is something you are really passionate about then you should still go for it, but know that for you it will even harder than it is for everyone else, and its hard to begin with. Don't sell yourself short and don't let lupus hold you back if its really what you want to do. You just have to go into it knowing that its going to be difficult and it will probably take you longer to get through the classes. And depending on what kind of doctor you want to be you wont always be working with "sick people" like people who are contagious. I want to be a rheumatologist so I wont be in an office where people will necessarily be coming in with infections all the time. I hope you do whatever you feel is best for you and dont let lupus alone make your decision. :)

magistramarla
04-21-2012, 07:37 PM
Aimee,
I agree with what others have told you here. Rheumatology would be a great field for people like you and Ritz. We need more docs in the field who really "get us". There are also a wide variety of options in research, too.
My oldest daughter is a Neurobiology PHD. She's been working in research, but she's about to transition to a job in science policy in DC. She's looking at working in an office that will try to devise plans for encouraging more women and minorities to study neurobiology and other "hard" science fields.
We need more young women like you and Ritz to pursue those science and medicine careers.
Hugs,
Marla