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FranzeeSmith
08-09-2011, 10:17 PM
Sooooo.....I'm not sure if its true or not, but are there certain foods we shouldnt eat? Or is it different for everyone? Kind of like trial and error?

ruziska
08-09-2011, 10:24 PM
it can be said about every disease and issue out there. I know for migraine sufferers the word is to stay away from the nightshade family which includes tomatoes. Never had a problem with tomatoes giving me a migraine. Heartburn? oh yeah, but not a migraine. In some cases it is obvious such as acid foods and heartburn don't mix. As far as lupus is concerned, it has taken a lot from my life my my food choices will NOT be one of them!

lovedbyHim
08-09-2011, 11:36 PM
Alfalfa sprouts are always brought up to be avoided. I eat mainly low fat, no salt, and food with high nutrition content, because I truly feel better on a healthy diet. The meds make me retain fluid and I don't need added water weight.

KCat
08-10-2011, 09:59 AM
*removed post*

Elo
08-10-2011, 10:06 AM
There is a theory out there that eating a diet full of anti-inflammatory foods, and cutting out foods with inflammation, will cause you to feel better because it reduces inflammation which causes pain.
If you are thinking about trying a diet out, first consult your doctor, of course. But what you might want to try to do is an elimination diet. You can do this a few ways. One is that you eliminate...pretty much everything. LOL. Dairy, wheat, gluten, processed foods, sugars, meat, fish...basically become a vegan. Then, after about a week, you slowly introduce one food back into your diet at a time, so you can tell if it makes you feel worse or not. If it makes you feel bad, cut it out, if not, keep eating that and the rest of your vegan diet for about a week, and then add in another one...etc. etc.
Obviously, this is kind of icky..lol. So the other thing you can do is just keep on with your normal diet, then stop eating one food (or food group) for 2 weeks, then reintroduce it and see how you feel. It's best to keep a food and symptom journal to figure it out.

But..yeah. Basically it's different for everyone, so it's pretty much a lot of playing around to find what works for you - just like with medication.

Good Luck (:

KCat
08-10-2011, 10:06 AM
This has to be quick as I have an appt but I wanted to add.

*anything that you eat too regularly can become a problem. If your immune system is in high gear, it can detect a constant influx of a particular chemical as an invader (such as nuts or milk or whatever) and begin to try to eliminate it from your body. It will become, therefore, an allergen and will try to throw it off. This is how food allergies often start in adults. You might be fine with that peanut butter and jelly sandwich you've eaten for 20 years but after the 10th one in the last 10 days now that you've got lupus, suddenly it makes your gut hurt and you don't make the connection. Then the next time you eat it you're on the bathroom floor heaving. Sometimes, you can go several weeks or months and due to how the immune system works, this can be resolved and you can eat the food again. Other times, it might develop into something so awful that it is life-threatening.

This is a good argument for not getting into food ruts. Everything in moderation.

KCat - speaking from heaving experience

ritzbit
08-10-2011, 10:50 AM
I was just asked my rheumy on Monday this week when I had an appointment about changing my diet, because I've been having a lot of stomach issues lately. She blew it off as usual but said that really there wasn't anything specific she would tell me not to eat. I am thinking about going on a semi vegetarian diet because I think meat has been what causing my stomach issues partly. Anywho, Im pretty sure there aren't many things to definately avoid.

tgal
08-10-2011, 12:45 PM
The ONLY proven food to cause are legumes. Due to the trouble it often causes the forums we try very hard to stay away from the food discussion. We understand that there are many theories of foods that can or cannot, should or should not, be eaten but only the one above can be proven. Too many people have been lost due to trying to find alternatives to meds (such as vitamins, foods ect) that we try to be careful when having discussions like this. The diet that is recommended for Lupus patients is simply a healthy diet that is recommended is simply a healthy diet as is recommended for everyone.

This doesn't mean that each person individually may not have issues with certain foods it simply means that that there is not a one for all and all for one for one diet

KCat
08-10-2011, 01:04 PM
This resource directly references some reliable resources, including the foremost clinicians in the United States.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/442024-foods-to-eat-for-lupus/

To each their own but I highly recommend reading Dr. Wallace's books both The Clinician's Guide and The Lupus Book. The former may be a bit out of range for some, the latter is aimed at the patient and is an excellent book that is of great value to the patient in understanding their disease.

magistramarla
08-10-2011, 01:05 PM
I've heard about the alfalfa sprouts causing a problem, but since I've never been a huge fan of them, not eating them is no loss.
Otherwise, I'm much like Tammy. I try to cook and eat a very healthy diet. We eat almost no white sugar or flour in our house, and nothing that is processed or pre-packaged.
That helps to avoid the extra salt and bad fats that are in those foods.
I love to watch the Food Network, so I've been cooking from scratch a lot, and making meals that are full of lots of fresh veggies and fresh herbs that I learn from the chefs there. Olive oil is a "good fat", and I use it a lot - I keep different kinds of it for cooking or for dressing salads.
I agree with the idea of "everything in moderation", unless you know that you have a sensitivity to a particular food group.
As others have said, it takes trial and error to figure that out, and is probably best done with the guidance of an allergist or a nutritionist.
Hugs,
Marla

lizbond36
08-11-2011, 04:52 PM
I have heard of Honey and chocolate. I avoid those :-) The honey mess up the meds so I have been told, Chocolate make me go potty. I know sick huh
Hugs
Liz

tgal
08-11-2011, 05:03 PM
I take a teaspoon of local honey daily to help with my allergies. Works great and I have no issues with it

lovedbyHim
08-11-2011, 05:55 PM
I take a teaspoon of local honey daily to help with my allergies. Works great and I have no issues with it

Does that really work? I have hay fever. Will that work for that?

tgal
08-11-2011, 05:59 PM
Does that really work? I have hay fever. Will that work for that?

Yes it does although I didn't believe it at first. My sister in law started doing it for her grandson because he had allergies so badly. He stopped having them so I decided to try it. It has to be local honey though. Local honey will have all of the local allergens in it. It takes a couple of months to kick in but it does work

lovedbyHim
08-11-2011, 06:05 PM
I'm going to the Amish farm near me who sells it. I love honey. That is one treatment I will enjoy! Thanks!

JuliaL
08-11-2011, 06:35 PM
I don't know if it's just me (although I have read that it's been showing up as a common problem among Lupies) but I have BAD reactions to artificial sweeteners. I discovered this totally by accident several years ago. I don't eat "diet" foods or drink diet sodas. However, I started to get a horrible pounding headache, the kind where it hurts to have your head touch the pillow, every week. It would be accompanied by diarrhea.

The first and second times, I thought it was a fluke. The third time it happened, I started thinking back to the previous attacks and trying to figure it out. I realized it happened on Wednesdays, specifically the Wednesdays I was attending a prayer group meeting at a friend's house. So, the next Wednesday I went I asked her if she put anything special in the iced tea she served at every meeting. She said, no, just some artificial sweetener. Aha! LOL, I politely declined and asked for a glass of water, instead. No headache!

And I didn't have one for a very long time until, once again, i was at a friend's house for lunch. After lunch, we were sitting around talking and dang if the headache and diarrhea didn't start up! i asked if any of the food or drink contained artificial sweeteners -- yep, the dessert cookies did. Suspicions confirmed!

So now I'm VERY careful about not eating or drinking anything with that stuff in it. The problem is that they're sneaking it into everything these days! Just last week, I had to return some fruit-flavored water to Albertson's because there was nothing on the outside of the packaging that said it contained artificial sweeteners. Unfortunately, after I drank some, I knew. And, sure enough, when I looked up some of the words I didn't recognize in the ingredients, one of them was fake sweetener.

I know there's a lot of debate about whether that stuff is bad for people but I know my body reacts badly to it!

magistramarla
08-11-2011, 08:36 PM
Julia,
In the late '70s my hubby was a chemistry major and I was expecting our first baby. Aspartame was just staring to hit the store shelves, and his professor thought that it would be a good lab for his students to do a chemical analysis of it. Jeff came home and told me about his lab and then asked me to never buy the stuff and to never, ever expose our child to it. Our family remained artificial sweetener-free because of that.

Like you, the few times that I've happened to have any of it, I get a migraine-like headache. My poor youngest daughter has a horrible reaction. Once, she hurried into her apartment on a hot day and her room-mate handed her a glass of soda. She had chugged most of it down before she noticed the odd taste of the artificial sweetener.
She hurried off to her class, and got so violently ill during class, the professor had her taken to the campus clinic. The nurse there was so worried, she called me to come get her.

I'm very, very careful to read all labels before I buy. We don't drink soda or flavored water at all. I avoid most pre-packaged foods, but I have to be vary careful when buying things like yogurt. I don't even accept samples at the store without reading the ingredients carefully.
It sucks to be sensitive!
Hugs,
Marla

tgal
08-11-2011, 09:23 PM
I don't know if it's just me (although I have read that it's been showing up as a common problem among Lupies) but I have BAD reactions to artificial sweeteners. I discovered this totally by accident several years ago. I don't eat "diet" foods or drink diet sodas. However, I started to get a horrible pounding headache, the kind where it hurts to have your head touch the pillow, every week. It would be accompanied by diarrhea.

The first and second times, I thought it was a fluke. The third time it happened, I started thinking back to the previous attacks and trying to figure it out. I realized it happened on Wednesdays, specifically the Wednesdays I was attending a prayer group meeting at a friend's house. So, the next Wednesday I went I asked her if she put anything special in the iced tea she served at every meeting. She said, no, just some artificial sweetener. Aha! LOL, I politely declined and asked for a glass of water, instead. No headache!

And I didn't have one for a very long time until, once again, i was at a friend's house for lunch. After lunch, we were sitting around talking and dang if the headache and diarrhea didn't start up! i asked if any of the food or drink contained artificial sweeteners -- yep, the dessert cookies did. Suspicions confirmed!

So now I'm VERY careful about not eating or drinking anything with that stuff in it. The problem is that they're sneaking it into everything these days! Just last week, I had to return some fruit-flavored water to Albertson's because there was nothing on the outside of the packaging that said it contained artificial sweeteners. Unfortunately, after I drank some, I knew. And, sure enough, when I looked up some of the words I didn't recognize in the ingredients, one of them was fake sweetener.

I know there's a lot of debate about whether that stuff is bad for people but I know my body reacts badly to it!

They don't bother me at all. I use splenda in everything and I have never seen a change when I didnt

steve.b
08-12-2011, 05:01 AM
I don't know if it's just me (although I have read that it's been showing up as a common problem among Lupies) but I have BAD reactions to artificial sweeteners. I discovered this totally by accident several years ago. I don't eat "diet" foods or drink diet sodas. However, I started to get a horrible pounding headache, the kind where it hurts to have your head touch the pillow, every week. It would be accompanied by diarrhea.

i also have had problems with artaficial sweeteners.

i currently use a sugar substitute "stevia" it is made from the stevia plant. it is a natural product.
the literature i have found states that stevia helps lower the blood sugar level. this makes it easier to diet.

there is two main brands opvia and natvia. i prefer natvia, as the aftertaste is not as bitter.

JuliaL
08-12-2011, 05:37 PM
I'd heard that stevia can be bitter and is a decent substitute for some things but not for others. I didn't know there are two brands and the taste differs! thanks for the info, Steve!

tgal
08-12-2011, 07:35 PM
Hey Guys and Gals,

I just want to point out to all of those reading and not posting that we are NOT giving out any kind of "Lupus Diet". There is no such diet but each of us have found things that work, or don't work, for us as individuals. As you read this thread please understand that we are not telling you what will and wont work for you. This is just a group of people sharing ideas and information that may help others.

Now, if you are reading and not posting... Go ahead and sign up! We would love to have you with us!!!

magistramarla
08-12-2011, 09:23 PM
i also have had problems with artaficial sweeteners.

i currently use a sugar substitute "stevia" it is made from the stevia plant. it is a natural product.
the literature i have found states that stevia helps lower the blood sugar level. this makes it easier to diet.

there is two main brands opvia and natvia. i prefer natvia, as the aftertaste is not as bitter.

Steve,
Have you tried Agave Nectar? It doesn't raise the blood sugar level, and tastes great. I've been using it in place of honey in some recipes and especially in tea.

bunny28
08-13-2011, 05:10 AM
Okay, dumb question...What is in the legume family?

Elo
08-13-2011, 06:45 AM
Not a dumb question at all.
According to here: http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/English/botanical.htm#by_Food_Family

They are: Legume:Acacia; Acacia Gum; Alfalfa; Arabic; Black-eyed pea; Carob; Carob (St. John's Bread); Cassia; Chick Pea; Field Pea; Green Bean; Green Pea; Guar gum; Jack bean; Karaya Gum; Kidney bean; Lentil; Licorice; Lima bean; Locust Bean Gum; Mungo Bean; Navy Bean; Peanut; Peanut oil; Pinto Bean; Soybean; Soybean oil/flour/lecithin; Split Pea; String Bean; Talca Gum; Tamarind; Tonka bean; Tragancanth Gum; Urd Flour.

bunny28
08-13-2011, 10:06 AM
Not a dumb question at all.
According to here: http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/English/botanical.htm#by_Food_Family

They are: Legume:Acacia; Acacia Gum; Alfalfa; Arabic; Black-eyed pea; Carob; Carob (St. John's Bread); Cassia; Chick Pea; Field Pea; Green Bean; Green Pea; Guar gum; Jack bean; Karaya Gum; Kidney bean; Lentil; Licorice; Lima bean; Locust Bean Gum; Mungo Bean; Navy Bean; Peanut; Peanut oil; Pinto Bean; Soybean; Soybean oil/flour/lecithin; Split Pea; String Bean; Talca Gum; Tamarind; Tonka bean; Tragancanth Gum; Urd Flour.

Thank you! Interestingly, I don't eat most of them...have never loved them I guess. But in the last few years I have eater Chickpea (hummus), chili (with assorted beans) and I have always loved peanut butter. I think I will watch the next few times I eat them and see what my symptoms do that day. Not that I am saying that I will need to avoid them but it will be interesting to see what my body does if anything. Thanks again.

tgal
08-13-2011, 10:13 AM
Thank you! Interestingly, I don't eat most of them...have never loved them I guess. But in the last few yea0

s I have eater Chickpea (hummus), chili (with assorted beans) and I have always loved peanut butter. I think I will watch the next few times I eat them and see what my symptoms do that day. Not that I am saying that I will need to avoid them but it will be interesting to see what my body does if anything. Thanks again.

I must step in here Bunny...I must correct you on this post... Real Chili has NO beans!!! LOL That stuff you are talking about is bean soup LOL (It's a Texas thing)

lacey50
08-13-2011, 02:11 PM
What kind of problems are associated with eating beans?

tgal
08-13-2011, 02:49 PM
What kind of problems are associated with eating beans?

They tend to cause inflammation in the body as well as make the immune system rev up. As you know we do not need help with inflammation and our immune systems works over time already!

magistramarla
08-13-2011, 09:06 PM
I must step in here Bunny...I must correct you on this post... Real Chili has NO beans!!! LOL That stuff you are talking about is bean soup LOL (It's a Texas thing)

I guess it shows that I'm not truly a Texan, even though I lived there so long - I love beans in my chili.
Hugs,
Marla

tgal
08-13-2011, 10:08 PM
I guess it shows that I'm not truly a Texan, even though I lived there so long - I love beans in my chili.
Hugs,
Marla

Shame shame Marla! Lol love ya anyway!

lacey50
08-14-2011, 05:26 PM
This is for those of you who love eating beans like I do. I love mexican type dishes, and so many include beans, so I did some researching. I found this info on the Lupus Fondation website. I don't know if the info is current, but I'm going with it being the latest and greatest news for me.

Diet

People with lupus should eat a nutritious, well-balanced diet.

There are some suggestions that fish, or specifically eicosopentanioc acid in fish oil, might have modest anti-inflammatory properties. The results of double-blind controlled studies showed that eating the equivalent of two fish meals a week clearly helps rheumatoid arthritis pain.
An amino acid, L-canavanine, is found in alfalfa sprouts and can activate the immune system and increase inflammation in lupus patients. Other foods in the legume family have only a fraction of the L-canavanine that sprouts do and are safe to eat.
Lupus patients taking corticosteroids should limit their sugar and salt intake.

tgal
08-14-2011, 05:34 PM
This is for those of you who love eating beans like I do. I love mexican type dishes, and so many include beans, so I did some researching. I found this info on the Lupus Fondation website. I don't know if the info is current, but I'm going with it being the latest and greatest news for me.

Diet

People with lupus should eat a nutritious, well-balanced diet.

There are some suggestions that fish, or specifically eicosopentanioc acid in fish oil, might have modest anti-inflammatory properties. The results of double-blind controlled studies showed that eating the equivalent of two fish meals a week clearly helps rheumatoid arthritis pain.
An amino acid, L-canavanine, is found in alfalfa sprouts and can activate the immune system and increase inflammation in lupus patients. Other foods in the legume family have only a fraction of the L-canavanine that sprouts do and are safe to eat.
Lupus patients taking corticosteroids should limit their sugar and salt intake.

That is great info! It appears that they have made it a bit more specific then it used to be! I can tell you that one of my favorite winter foods are pinto beans. I have also noticed a bit more problems with them lately so it may just be something with my body that will go away (LOL HEY!! They are good and cheap. The perfect combo). Info form the Lupus Foundation is a perfect source.

Good job on that find! Makes me feel better already!

magistramarla
08-14-2011, 06:28 PM
I'll second that! Says the girl who just finished eating homemade chicken chalupas slathered with refried black beans.
Hugs,
Marla

Elo
08-15-2011, 09:50 AM
I'll second that! Says the girl who just finished eating homemade chicken chalupas slathered with refried black beans.
Hugs,
Marla


MMmm... black beans....
And chili without beans is just... blasphemy!!! I mean, the beans are what makes it so hearty and nummy! Hehehe

tgal
08-15-2011, 10:00 AM
MMmm... black beans...."
And chili without beans is just... blasphemy!!! I mean, the beans are what makes it so hearty and nummy! Hehehe

No. the beans change it from Chili to soup!

" Though defining what authentic Texas chili is can be difficult. The term “chili” comes from chile con carne, which translates to peppers with meat."'
LOLOL See???

Elo
08-15-2011, 10:11 AM
No. the beans change it from Chili to soup!

" Though defining what authentic Texas chili is can be difficult. The term “chili” comes from chile con carne, which translates to peppers with meat."'
LOLOL See???

FINE!!
Mmm.. bean soup that tastes remarkably like chili except more hearty..
LOL!!!! Just teasing (:

tgal
08-15-2011, 10:45 AM
FINE!!
Mmm.. bean soup that tastes remarkably like chili except more hearty..
LOL!!!! Just teasing (:

LOLOL OK, I am sure your bean soup is WONDERFUL!

Thanks for the laughs

rob
08-15-2011, 12:07 PM
I like my Chili with beans (sorry Mari). In fact, I love beans, especially black beans. Basic refried beans with cheese melted on top is great too. With all the dishes I cook that contain beans, I wouldn't be surprised if there was a hole in the ozone layer the size of Manhattan over my house.

As for foods to avoid, the one biggie that I know of has been mentioned already-alfalfa sprouts. Beyond that, there is no "diet" that will modify Lupus disease activity. And with that in mind, why make our already difficult days more difficult and unenjoyable by not eating the things that we like to eat? Living with Lupus sucks. I'm not going to make it suck even more by denying myself some small pleasures in a vain attempt to control a disease that cannot be controlled simply by changing your diet.

To heck with that. Practice moderation, but eat the things you like.

Rob