PDA

View Full Version : Lupus, Environmental Influences?



dawn patrol
07-05-2011, 04:35 PM
Once I mentioned that I had Lupus to my friends, I started meeting a lot of other women that also have it. Then I started hearing this weird rumor that it is possibly in the drinking water within this 10 mile radius. Sounds crazy, huh? Could that be true? How much of an environmental factor is there with Lupus? Personally I'd like to think none but there are a lot of cases in my area...
We don't have flouride in our water.

Any thoughts?

The relative safety of Hawaii's drinking water.
Au LK.
Source
Dept. of Health, Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response (HEER) Office, Honolulu, Hawaii.
Abstract
There are two types of drinking water sources: groundwater and surface water (the latter includes catchment of rain). Surface water runs over the surface of the earth in rivers and watercourses, or is stored in lakes and reservoirs. groundwater is water that is stored below ground level; it feeds artesian wells and springs. It is important to remember that untreated groundwater may not be the same thing as treated drinking water. A contaminant in groundwater represents a threat to a drinking water source but not necessarily a threat to health, if the contaminant's concentration is decreased before it becomes available as potable.

PMID: 2061030 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Saysusie
07-05-2011, 05:14 PM
In the research that I have done over the years, I have found lots of information about environmental triggers, but not environmental causes (such as drinking water!). I suppose that if someone were to contract a viral infection due to contaminated water, you could say that the drinking water had an affect in the appearance of Lupus. However, there would be a lot of "Ifs" in this scenario.

The following information is from the Lupus Foundation of America:

WHAT CAUSES LUPUS:

GENES:
No gene or group of genes has been proven to cause lupus. Lupus does, however, appear in certain families, and when one of two identical twins has lupus, there is an increased chance that the other twin will also develop the disease. These findings, as well as others, strongly suggest that genes are involved in the development of lupus. Although lupus can develop in people with no family history of lupus, there are likely to be other autoimmune diseases in some family members. Certain ethnic groups (people of African, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Island descent) have a greater risk of developing lupus, which may be related to genes they have in common.
Environment
While a person’s genes may increase the chance that he or she will develop lupus, it takes some kind of environmental trigger to set off the illness or to bring on a flare. Examples include:


ultraviolet rays from the sun
ultraviolet rays from fluorescent light bulbs
sulfa drugs, which make a person more sensitive to the sun, such as: Bactrim® and Septra® (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole); sulfisoxazole (Gantrisin®); tolbutamide (Orinase®); sulfasalazine (Azulfidine®); diuretics
sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)
penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)
an infection
a cold or a viral illness
exhaustion
an injury
emotional stress, such as a divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications
anything that causes stress to the body, such as surgery, physical harm, pregnancy, or giving birth

Although many seemingly unrelated factors can trigger the onset of lupus in a susceptible person, scientists have noted some common features among many people who have lupus, including:


exposure to the sun
an infection
being pregnant
giving birth
a drug taken to treat an illness

However, many people cannot remember or identify any specific factor that occurred before they were diagnosed with lupus.


Hormones
Hormones are the body’s messengers and they regulate many of the body’s functions. In particular, the sex hormone estrogen plays a role in lupus. Men and women both produce estrogen, but estrogen production is much greater in females. Many women have more lupus symptoms before menstrual periods and/or during pregnancy, when estrogen production is high. This may indicate that estrogen somehow regulates the severity of lupus. However, it does not mean that estrogen, or any other hormone for that matter, causes lupus.
Related Information

Environmental Factors in Lupus (http://www.lupus.org/webmodules/webarticlesnet/?z=523&a=595)
January 2007 webchat transcript with Dr. Mark Gourley
Frequently Asked Questions

Is lupus stress related?
We do not know for certain. There are many anecdotal reports (personal accounts) of lupus flaring during or after a stressful time, but this question requires further scientific study.
Does lupus occur more often in certain geographical areas?
No. There are on-going studies of several suspected "clusters" of lupus case but no evidence has emerged that suggests lupus is more prevalent in specific areas.
Is lupus related to pollution or toxic chemicals?
We do not know. The cause of lupus, and many other autoimmune diseases, remains unknown. The respective roles of genetic and environmental factors in triggering lupus remain to be determined. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), the principal biomedical research agency of the United States Government established the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) to study issues related to environmental health. A meeting in September 1998 at Research Triangle Institute(RTI) in Durham, NC organized by NIEHS, looked at autoimmunity and the environment and specifically lupus. A review of the discussion was published in the medical journal, Arthritis and Rheumatism (1998 Oct; 41(10): 1714-24) in an article titled: "Hormonal, Environmental, and Infectious Risk Factors for Developing Systemic Lupus Erythematosus" by Cooper GS, Dooley MA, Treadwell EL, St Clair EW, Parks CG, Gilkeson GS.
Can something in your diet cause lupus?
We do not believe so.
Is there any truth to the claims being circulated on the Internet that lupus is caused by the artificial sweetener, aspartame?
We are aware there is an email message circulating on the Internet warning individuals with lupus about dangers associated with using the artificial sweetener aspartame. The Lupus Foundation of America consulted with the chair of the LFA Medical Council, Evelyn Hess, MD, MACP, MACR. Dr. Hess is one of the nation's leading researchers in the field of lupus specializing in environmental influences. According to Dr. Hess, there is, as of now, no specific proof of an association with aspartame as a cause or worsening of SLE. People with lupus should always consult with their physician before making any changes in their medical treatment, diet, exercise or other routine based on information received via the Internet or other sources lacking known credentials.

Peace aned Blessings
Namaste
Saysusie

tgal
07-05-2011, 08:25 PM
Once I mentioned that I had Lupus to my friends, I started meeting a lot of other women that also have it. Then I started hearing this weird rumor that it is possibly in the drinking water within this 10 mile radius. Sounds crazy, huh? Could that be true? How much of an environmental factor is there with Lupus? Personally I'd like to think none but there are a lot of cases in my area...
We don't have flouride in our water.

Any thoughts?

The relative safety of Hawaii's drinking water.
Au LK.
Source
Dept. of Health, Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response (HEER) Office, Honolulu, Hawaii.
Abstract
There are two types of drinking water sources: groundwater and surface water (the latter includes catchment of rain). Surface water runs over the surface of the earth in rivers and watercourses, or is stored in lakes and reservoirs. groundwater is water that is stored below ground level; it feeds artesian wells and springs. It is important to remember that untreated groundwater may not be the same thing as treated drinking water. A contaminant in groundwater represents a threat to a drinking water source but not necessarily a threat to health, if the contaminant's concentration is decreased before it becomes available as potable.

PMID: 2061030 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

I find this very interesting because I went into the water search as well. The county that I live in has high arsenic levels in our drinking water. I spent a lot of time searching for answers to that as well. In just a very small area (just a few square blocks) there are people with Lupus, people with RA, people with Undiagnosed AI diseases. When I figured out how many it really concerned me but I can't find a clear cut connection.

I will keep looking with you!

ruziska
07-05-2011, 08:54 PM
I have no doubt environmental issues are a factor with lupus as well as many other illnesses. Artificial ingredients, bgh, pollution, fillers, fake this, phony that. Hole in the ozone, global warming, toxic waste, toxic rain, face it- we're doomed! lol ok? Cell phones cause brain cancer, the sun causes skin cancer and reeks havoc on lupies, heavy metals in the drinking water (new one around here). Sometimes I'm amazed I make it through the day at all! Maybe all this stuff isn't the cause but it sure isn't helping...

Peridot20_Gem
07-06-2011, 08:05 AM
Hi Dawn,

Where i live there's on one woman i know of having it but when i get to the hospital there's loads with the condition's and the hospital covers a large county in the uk but my condition was inherited off my parent's.

Great thread about Lupus though.