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tgal
06-02-2011, 12:51 AM
I am on my 3rd day of an Atkins type diet because there is research showing that it can help with seizures. It appears to work best in children and since mine are not happening because of electrical impulses but because of blood flow being interrupted due to inflammation, we are not sure if it will work in my case. My doctor did say it was worth a try and I wouldn't have done it without discussing it with him first. I guess my question is: Has anyone else tried the modified Atkins for seizures and did it work? A wonderful side effect will be weight loss but I would love to know someone that did it and had positive results.

Any input would be appreciated

Peridot20_Gem
06-02-2011, 01:02 AM
Mari,

As you know i have seizure's but never had to do an Atkins diet but i wish you all the best with it and concerning your seizure's. xxxx

tgal
06-02-2011, 01:06 AM
Mari,

As you know i have seizure's but never had to do an Atkins diet but i wish you all the best with it and concerning your seizure's. xxxx

I will let you know how it goes. It is not the exact Atkins, it is a modified Atkins. I guess we will seen!

Peridot20_Gem
06-02-2011, 01:10 AM
Information on the Atkins diet with adults

Modified Atkins Diet Can Cut Epileptic Seizures in Adults

High-fat, low-carb diet may be an option when other treatments fail
A modified version of a popular high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can significantly cut the number of seizures in adults with epilepsy, a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests. The Atkins-like diet, which has shown promise for seizure control in children, may offer a new lifeline for patients when drugs and other treatments fail or cause complications.

For almost a century, doctors have prescribed an eating plan called the ketogenic diet to treat children with epilepsy. This diet often consists of a short period of fasting, strictly limits fluids and drastically restricts carbohydrates. It appears to limit or even eliminate seizures, possibly by generating the build-up of ketones, compounds the body produces when it derives calories mostly from fat. Some of the largest studies to scientifically test this diet’s efficacy took place at Johns Hopkins in the mid-1990s, led by pediatric neurologists John Freeman, M.D., and Eileen Vining, M.D.

Why exactly the ketogenic diet works remains unknown, and it is notoriously difficult to follow, relying almost solely on fat and protein for calories. Consequently, doctors typically recommend it only for children, whose parents can strictly monitor their eating habits. The ketogenic diet is almost never prescribed to adults, who generally make their own food choices and often have difficulty complying with the diet’s strict guidelines.

In 2002, Johns Hopkins researchers began testing a modified version of the Atkins diet in children with epilepsy. The modified diet shares the high-fat focus of the ketogenic diet, prompting the body to generate ketones. However, it allows more carbohydrates and protein, doesn’t limit fluids and calories, and has no fasting period. When studies showed that the new diet prevented or curtailed seizures in children, the researchers began testing it for efficacy and ease of use in adults.

Reporting on the results in the February issue of Epilepsia, Eric H. Kossoff, M.D., an assistant professor of neurology and pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said 30 adults with epilepsy, ages 18 to 53 years, who had tried at least two anticonvulsant drugs without success and had an average of 10 seizures per week, were placed on the modified Atkins diet. All patients were seen for free in the Johns Hopkins General Clinical Research Center.

The regimen restricted them to 15 grams of carbohydrates a day. “That’s a few strawberries, some vegetables, or a bit of bread,” says Kossoff. The diet offers most of its calories from fat-eggs, meats, oils and heavy cream-with as much protein and no-carb beverages as patients want.

Each day, patients kept diaries of what they ate and how many seizures they had. The researchers evaluated how each patient was doing at one, three and six months after starting the diet.

Results showed that about half the patients had experienced a 50 percent reduction in the frequency of their seizures by the first clinic visit. About a third of the patients halved the frequency of seizures by three months. Side effects linked with the diet, such as a rise in cholesterol or triglycerides, were mild. A third of the patients dropped out by the third month, unable to comply with the restrictions.

Fourteen patients who stuck with the diet until the six-month mark chose to continue, even after the study ended-a testament to how effective the diet worked to treat their epilepsy, Kossoff notes.

Though the modified Atkins diet won’t be a good fit for all patients, says Kossoff, “it opens up another therapeutic option for adults trying to decide between medication, surgery and electrical stimulation to treat intractable seizures.” A second study to examine the diet’s effects on adults with intractable seizures is under way.

Peridot20_Gem
06-02-2011, 01:11 AM
I will let you know how it goes. It is not the exact Atkins, it is a modified Atkins. I guess we will seen!Mari,

I've added in on the modified Aktkins diet for adults incase it may help.

steve.b
06-02-2011, 02:55 AM
when i was in my teens, i had a friend who was in there 50's who was on the diet.
i never knew what was wrong with him.
his symptoms were high blood pressure, and he would get angry for no known reason.
really angry, and bad headaches.

he swore by the diet. to the point he would go without food if he could not find anything suitable.

it helped him, that is why he was so devout to it.

tgal
06-02-2011, 08:28 AM
I already researched it myself Terrie. I wouldn't be trying it if I hadn't. Thanks for the effort though

SandyR
06-02-2011, 09:02 AM
hmmm...remember the movie Lorenzo's Oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenzo's_Oil)? The kid in that movie had ALD, which is another disease affected by the breaking down of the myelin sheath, and his parents and doctors started him on a daily dose of an oil mix of long-fatty chain oils. Sound familiar? A disease with no cure that has a myelin sheath breakdown that is being treated with a high fatty chain diet...Sounds like the doctors are onto something good with this Atkin's idea and I can honestly say until you posted this I never would have made the connection.

tgal
06-02-2011, 09:08 AM
hmmm...remember the movie Lorenzo's Oil (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenzo's_Oil)? The kid in that movie had ALD, which is another disease affected by the breaking down of the myelin sheath, and his parents and doctors started him on a daily dose of an oil mix of long-fatty chain oils. Sound familiar? A disease with no cure that has a myelin sheath breakdown that is being treated with a high fatty chain diet...Sounds like the doctors are onto something good with this Atkin's idea and I can honestly say until you posted this I never would have made the connection.

I never thought of that Sandy! My MRIs have been showing issues with my myelin sheath that is one of several reason they kept testing me for MS. I have been researching this for awhile because I did atkins to lose weight a long ago and i know how hard it is to stick to. Although my meds have helped a lot I am still having them every 2 weeks and if a diet change can help me get a small part of my life back (like driving) I would love it! So I am giving it a try guys! Will let you know how it goes!

Peridot20_Gem
06-08-2011, 08:42 AM
Hi Mari,

Hows the diet going and do you feel ok with it?? plus with your medication your on. xxx